Duronic 1M TOSLINK Goldspec High Resolution Professional Digital Optical TOSlink Cable - 24K Gold Casing. This cable can be used for the likes of DVD, PC, and games consoles such as the Sony PS3 £4.95 delivered @ Amazon - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit
Sold by DURONIC and Fulfilled by Amazon.

* Goldspec range includes optical and HDMI cables. The Goldspec range is perfect for low range to high end systems
* SKY, SKY+, PS3, BLU-RAY compatible
* Toslink fittings (square shaped plug)
* Great for fitters wanting a quality cable for re-sale or install use
* Standard Toslink optical fittings for digital surround sound use. This cable can be used for the likes of DVD, PC, and games consoles such as the Sony PS3.
Deal Tags:
More From Amazon:

All Comments

(34) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
1M Toslink cable in the Poundshop
#2
WTF has gold got to do with an optical cable???

Analogue cables maybe but not an optical, any cheapo one will do.
#3
daveleebond
Analogue cables maybe but not an optical, any cheapo one will do.


Are you suggesting that the carrier material (quartz glass, plastic, single strand, multi-strand), the end-termination, and the refractive index of a cable have no impact and the integrity of the data stream?

That's quite a bold statement!

Maybe on low quality or games console systems it makes no difference but it certainly does on higher resolution systems (for people with good ears).
#4
Can someone who knows what they are talking about (not just what they think they know) tell me whether this would be better than the cheapo one I currently have connecting my PS3 to amp?

Thanks in advance
#5
bigsky
Are you suggesting that the carrier material (quartz glass, plastic, single strand, multi-strand), the end-termination, and the refractive index of a cable have no impact and the integrity of the data stream?

That's quite a bold statement!

Maybe on low quality or games console systems it makes no difference but it certainly does on higher resolution systems (for people with good ears).


Got a cheap 1.00 one and borrowed a 20.00 one and I could not hear a difference in my Dolby through sky hd to my amp?
#6
bigsky;8743595
Are you suggesting that the carrier material (quartz glass, plastic, single strand, multi-strand), the end-termination, and the refractive index of a cable have no impact and the integrity of the data stream?

That's quite a bold statement!

Maybe on low quality or games console systems it makes no difference but it certainly does on higher resolution systems (for people with good ears).

gold is used for conductivity, optical cables have no possible benefit for gold connectors, this is just a carrot to wave in front of people with too much money
#7
Always makes me laugh when people think that gold plating affects an optical cable. Either light is arriving, or light is not arriving. The material the clip is made of is cosmetic - it could be made of dried dog turd and it would work the same. I get the feeling bigsky is having a little joke with us.

If it were a longer cable then you'd need very high quality silicon in the fibre, but for short lengths like this any old crap will do.

Nice cable for a fiver though. Reassuringly stiff.
#8
LMAO - gold plating on an optical cable!
#9
Massive overkill, Poundland for wait for it ,,,,,,, £1 each, its just as good, they both use light so why Gold plate it?

Gun
#10
Voted Cold!
#11
bigsky
Are you suggesting that the carrier material (quartz glass, plastic, single strand, multi-strand), the end-termination, and the refractive index of a cable have no impact and the integrity of the data stream?

That's quite a bold statement!

Maybe on low quality or games console systems it makes no difference but it certainly does on higher resolution systems (for people with good ears).


i think the fact that they are selling this on the basis of "Gold connector plating" tells us they are not paying attention to the type of cable either
#12
bigsky
Are you suggesting that the carrier material (quartz glass, plastic, single strand, multi-strand), the end-termination, and the refractive index of a cable have no impact and the integrity of the data stream?

That's quite a bold statement!

Maybe on low quality or games console systems it makes no difference but it certainly does on higher resolution systems (for people with good ears).


Wrong. It makes no difference to the 'sound quality'. It's a digital cable, either the signal is going through, or it's not.

If the cable is really really crap, you'd hear blocking artifacts (i.e. the sound would stop & start), but in terms of sound quality, if the signal is there it's perfect every time. That's why digital is seen as better by many.
#13
daveleebond;8743531
WTF has gold got to do with an optical cable???

Analogue cables maybe but not an optical, any cheapo one will do.

moron, its even more important to source a well built optical cable...i wouldnt use really cheap £1 ones....i have used expense ones and cheap ones and generally the more expensive they are the better built they are......however these are delicate cables - unfortunately my av setup isnt suitable for the bulkier well made cables from eg chord.....damaged 2 already (got mine free anyway)! so now use a slightly less well built but decent quality optical cable from cable mountain
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B001P9Q130/ref=ox_ya_os_product
#14
royals
moron


Why? Maybe he was blunt, but he's right. :whistling:
#15
ctuk;8743733
gold is used for conductivity, optical cables have no possible benefit for gold connectors, this is just a carrot to wave in front of people with too much money

its NOT ! jes there are is some garabge spouted on these forums
sure there is the cynical marketing element to this and some claims by manufacturers - monster being one - are laughable
its actually there for anti corrosion purposes to stop it welding itself to the contact on eg your amp - you may laugh BUT the cable could on there for years - given the heat temp of amps this is a useful addition
oh and it looks nicer i guess
#16
Systems;8743861
Always makes me laugh when people think that gold plating affects an optical cable. Either light is arriving, or light is not arriving. The material the clip is made of is cosmetic - it could be made of dried dog turd and it would work the same. I get the feeling bigsky is having a little joke with us.

If it were a longer cable then you'd need very high quality silicon in the fibre, but for short lengths like this any old crap will do.

Nice cable for a fiver though. Reassuringly stiff.


oh dear....stick dog stuff on your cable then
#17
chrisjudd;8744262
Wrong. It makes no difference to the 'sound quality'. It's a digital cable, either the signal is going through, or it's not.

If the cable is really really crap, you'd hear blocking artifacts (i.e. the sound would stop & start), but in terms of sound quality, if the signal is there it's perfect every time. That's why digital is seen as better by many.

"If the cable is really really crap, you'd hear blocking artifacts (i.e. the sound would stop & start), but in terms of sound quality, if the signal is there it's perfect every time. That's why digital is seen as better by many."

quote of the year - so you agree then that if the cable is poorly built which alot of cheap ones are then the transmission wont get to its destination
#18
chrisjudd;8744562
Why? Maybe he was blunt, but he's right. :whistling:

nope, he clearly knows nothing about data transmission - i do thanks...id use decent quality built optical cables purely because they have delicate components - ive used a £1 from poundland and threw it in the bin after 1 week as it was so poorly made and kept falling out of the xbox360 connector
#19
royals
"If the cable is really really crap, you'd hear blocking artifacts (i.e. the sound would stop & start), but in terms of sound quality, if the signal is there it's perfect every time. That's why digital is seen as better by many."

quote of the year - so you agree then that if the cable is poorly built which alot of cheap ones are then the transmission wont get to its destination


I've got an original XBox, and a PS2 hooked up to a Yamaha AV amp via a cheap passive optical switch (http://www.cableuniverse.co.uk/catalog/cables/optical-Toslink-selector-1-in-3-out.html) and cheapo cables (http://www.cableuniverse.co.uk/catalog/cables/toslink-optical-cable-budget-1m.html. I wasn't honestly expecting it to work very well, but it works perfectly, all the time. On the other hand, some reviews indicated that some users did have problems; so the source and especially the receiver (i.e. to what extent it reclocks the incoming signal to reduce jitter) certainly have a part to play.
#20
royals
its NOT ! jes there are is some garabge spouted on these forums
sure there is the cynical marketing element to this and some claims by manufacturers - monster being one - are laughable
its actually there for anti corrosion purposes to stop it welding itself to the contact on eg your amp - you may laugh BUT the cable could on there for years - given the heat temp of amps this is a useful addition
oh and it looks nicer i guess


Funny thing is I can’t see my cheap nasty TOSlink cables they are round the back of my system and working perfectly. I even have one stretched to breaking point :p
#21
royals;8744665
its NOT ! jes there are is some garabge spouted on these forums
sure there is the cynical marketing element to this and some claims by manufacturers - monster being one - are laughable
its actually there for anti corrosion purposes to stop it welding itself to the contact on eg your amp - you may laugh BUT the cable could on there for years - given the heat temp of amps this is a useful addition
oh and it looks nicer i guess

So it is there for conductivity, corroded connectors would not conduct the signal efficiently, no metal is required for optical cables, a simple plastic connector would work just fine with no corrosion or "welding" issues. gold connectors for digital cables are just gimmicks
#22
Darrenrapley: “PS3 to an amp”. This should be fine. No point in spending much money on interconnects if a PS3 is your source component.

Canada16: “Dolby through sky hd to my amp” Ditto.

Now on to the rest of it. There are some pretty ignorant people posting here; you are welcome to your opinions but please don't spout them like they are true and everyone else is wrong if you really don’t now what you are talking about.

Let's first of all sort out the gold thing. It's just an inert metal coating. I did not mention anything about gold in my post and, of course, not being thick I would not allude to the conductivity of an optical cable being relevant. So let’s just drop the gold thing being a conductor in this thread shall we? Nobody said it was. As materials go it's not a bad, and also quite pretty, thing to make a mechanical connector out of regardless of its electrical characteristics.

Systems: you really have a problem. Dog turd would not make a good reliable mechanical connection as it could not keep the ends of the cable in line with the connector on the equipment. It would also smell nasty. Now, as for you thinking fibre optic cable is made out of silicon I think you need to get back to school and actually learn something. Silicon? LOL!!!

Chrisjudd. You said, “ either the signal is going through, or it's not.” Wrong. Do the word’s bandwidth or jitter mean anything to you? Thought not. It’s just ones and noughts in your world isn’t it Chris? Oh dear.

The reality is for low cost hi-fi, games consoles etc this is going to be fine and you really won’t notice any difference. But just because you don’t notice any difference on your system does not mean there is not a difference and some people with higher resolution sound systems may wish to benefit from a better cable.

Optical cables, have two interfaces (plugs) and a transmission line (the cable). The quality of the lenses (ends of cable), the precision of the connector (i.e. whether the cable is held in position) and the grade of material used in the cable make a difference to signal degradation. It’s not just a static on or off, it’s 125,000,000 ons and offs in one second. Transmission losses affect signal integrity and bandwidth, which first of all requires error correction and finally results in total failure. So Chrisjudd, long before you have got one of your legendary “blocking artefacts” the signal will need to be error corrected which is not particularly nice to listen to.

One further thing is the reflective index of optical cables. The more you bend them the more lossy they become. So good cables use multiple fibres or even quartz glass rather than plastic single fibres as found in cheaper cables.

Hope that helps someone. In general budget cables for average hi-fi or gaming applications are fine and you won’t notice a difference. And yes there are some very over-priced and unrealistic claims by some audiophile cable makers. But the laws of physics do not state that digital is perfect and nothing can go wrong to degrade the signal so send it along whatever cheap cable you fancy. If it matters to you you need to ensure that the ones and noughts get from one end of the cable to another with minimal degradation and therefore a better engineered interconnect is more likely to ensure this happens.
#23
Eventually someone who knows what they're talking about.
Still, doesn't mean the Pounland one is worse than the amazon one.
#24
royals
moron, its even more important to source a well built optical cable...i wouldnt use really cheap £1 ones....i have used expense ones and cheap ones and generally the more expensive they are the better built they are......however these are delicate cables - unfortunately my av setup isnt suitable for the bulkier well made cables from eg chord.....damaged 2 already (got mine free anyway)! so now use a slightly less well built but decent quality optical cable from cable mountain
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B001P9Q130/ref=ox_ya_os_product


Hilarious - Royals calling someone a moron!
#25
bigsky
Optical cables, have two interfaces (plugs) and a transmission line (the cable). The quality of the lenses (ends of cable), the precision of the connector (i.e. whether the cable is held in position) and the grade of material used in the cable make a difference to signal degradation. It’s not just a static on or off, it’s 125,000,000 ons and offs in one second. Transmission losses affect signal integrity and bandwidth, which first of all requires error correction and finally results in total failure. So Chrisjudd, long before you have got one of your legendary “blocking artefacts” the signal will need to be error corrected which is not particularly nice to listen to.


Optical TOSlink uses S/PDIF as the Data Link Layer. S/PDIF only has error detection, not error correction. Hence samples that fail the error detection check will probably be dropped and null samples output instead.

Source: http://www.epanorama.net/documents/audio/spdif.html
#26
royals
moron, its even more important to source a well built optical cable...i wouldnt use really cheap £1 ones....i have used expense ones and cheap ones and generally the more expensive they are the better built they are......however these are delicate cables - unfortunately my av setup isnt suitable for the bulkier well made cables from eg chord.....damaged 2 already (got mine free anyway)! so now use a slightly less well built but decent quality optical cable from cable mountain
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B001P9Q130/ref=ox_ya_os_product


Excuse me, but do you think its a good idea to start calling people names like that, what ever happened to people being civil?

You could have said " I think your mistaken", or "I don't think thats quite right" or "Are you sure", why do you have to resort to name calling like that in order to make a point?

Or am I not intune with what "young" people of today say and do..?

Bah Humbug....

Gun
#27
Cold. Sadly. Use the £1 cables instead. As long as they are undamaged, those bits will get through fine.

Corrosion, data integrity etc etc are all either nonsense or totally irrelevent at such short lengths.

Gold connectors, my mind boggles.
#28
£1.95 for a cheap 3m optical cable delivered free, and its not those cheap thin ones either, nice and thick.
#29
cowbutt
S/PDIF only has error detection, not error correction. Hence samples that fail the error detection check will probably be dropped and null samples output instead.


Wrong again, but a far more intellectual (and referenced) assumption than the others :thumbsup:

I see what you are getting at though. SPDIF is the transport layer and as such contains a simple parity check - i.e. good word or bad word. It doesn't have a retry feature so bad words are simply junked. But that's all that SPDIF does. Move a data stream from one place to the next

However this data stream eventually gets processed by a DAC and that will error correct. If SPDIF has sent it a few null words then it can cope (i.e. there won't be drop outs) but it may not be an accurate representation of the signal sent. That's where error correction can impact on what we hear and that's why it's a good idea to make sure that transport layer is as reliable as possible.
#30
bigsky
Wrong again, but a far more intellectual (and referenced) assumption than the others :thumbsup:

I see what you are getting at though. SPDIF is the transport layer and as such contains a simple parity check - i.e. good word or bad word. It doesn't have a retry feature so bad words are simply junked. But that's all that SPDIF does. Move a data stream from one place to the next

However this data stream eventually gets processed by a DAC and that will error correct. If SPDIF has sent it a few null words then it can cope (i.e. there won't be drop outs) but it may not be an accurate representation of the signal sent. That's where error correction can impact on what we hear and that's why it's a good idea to make sure that transport layer is as reliable as possible.


You are very knowledgeable on this subject I on the other hand just have experience of using cheap Toslink cables 5+ years without any problems:thumbsup:
#31
Geemac
You are very knowledgeable on this subject I on the other hand just have experience of using cheap Toslink cables 5+ years without any problems:thumbsup:


I don't doubt it for a moment, and as I have said low cost cables will probably be fine for most applications.

My objection is that some people think that all digital signals are perfect and uncorruptable so therefore only the very minimum specification is needed for an optical interconnect. The point I hope I am getting across is that whilst a very cheap one will work, a better engineered one will work better. Whether that actually matters is down to the application and the individual. Ultimately the decision to spend more on a cable must be based on how important digital data corruption is, and for a budget hi-fi, AV or games interface it's not that important at all!
#32
why is this so cold? factor in shipping costs and the fact that it is "nicer" and higher quality than a poundland one, this is a good deal.
#33
bigsky
Wrong again, but a far more intellectual (and referenced) assumption than the others :thumbsup:

I see what you are getting at though. SPDIF is the transport layer and as such contains a simple parity check - i.e. good word or bad word. It doesn't have a retry feature so bad words are simply junked. But that's all that SPDIF does. Move a data stream from one place to the next

However this data stream eventually gets processed by a DAC and that will error correct. If SPDIF has sent it a few null words then it can cope (i.e. there won't be drop outs) but it may not be an accurate representation of the signal sent. That's where error correction can impact on what we hear and that's why it's a good idea to make sure that transport layer is as reliable as possible.


I see what you're getting at, but...

Technically, the DAC can't error correct, as there isn't enough redundancy for it to do so. It can, however, interpolate missing samples, which is usually better than outputting null samples but won't be an accurate representation of what the source sent. On the other had, as you say, whether any human ear can tell the difference if the odd sample is interpolated is another matter...
#34
It's fine if you want to add a bit of bling to your home hifi but won't/can't improve the signal over the Poundland version. It might last a bit longer. I have unfortunately worked my way through a few Toslink cables which eventually kink and break the optical core.

Of course anyone who has paid attention in science class will know that glass does indeed contain Silicon, SiO2 specifically.

PS I have never heard so much bullshine in all my life from some of you purported experts.

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Top of Page
Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!