Electric Energy Monitor - £6.99 @ Lidl - HotUKDeals
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Electric Energy Monitor - £6.99 @ Lidl

whizzkid Avatar
7y, 14h agoFound 7 years, 14 hours ago
Good price for this and very useful.

Features:
Acurately monitor your energy consumption
Child-resistant socket
Displays:
- overall cost
- maximum current
- energy consumption
- mains voltage
- power input
- total power consumption and more
Deal Tags:
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All Comments

(17) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
http://www.lidl.co.uk/static_content/lidl_uk/images/UK/UK_33065_01_b_20100108134340.jpg
#2
Before you spend money, be aware these things use electricity. Is it really worth it? I don't even look at mine any longer I'm so bored.
#3
Got one of these and have never been able to make head nor tail of it!!!....
#4
pet2000
Before you spend money, be aware these things use electricity. Is it really worth it? I don't even look at mine any longer I'm so bored.


This one is powered by a battery. But anyway, you don't use it 24/7, just whilst you're auditing your appliances to see which are the electricity hogs. They're also useful when you're testing the effect of power management settings on PCs.
#5
jdr116
Got one of these and have never been able to make head nor tail of it!!!....


What do you find difficult? Whack it in 'WATT' mode and look at the power an appliance is using. 1kWh (kilowatt hour) is 1 unit, so if you have an appliance that uses 500W, it'll use 1 unit every two hours.

Alternatively, if you're trying to be green, divide the power usage (W) by the Power Factor to give the true amount of electricity that needs to be generated ('inductive loads' like power supplies and fluorescent lamps often have power factors less than 1) whilst 'resistive loads' like heaters, cookers and filament bulbs will have power factors of 1.
#6
I was given one of these - the text is so hard to see they should come with a magnifying glass!
#7
Get an owl monitor instead, unless you wish to specifically monitor 1 singular item.
the unit the wife purchased last time a deal like this was on at the above shop, it was fiddly & soon redundant..
#8
SusieM
I was given one of these - the text is so hard to see they should come with a magnifying glass!


This is true! I've put mine on an extension lead so I don't need to crouch on the floor in order to get close enough to read it.
1 Like #9
cowbutt
What do you find difficult? Whack it in 'WATT' mode and look at the power an appliance is using. 1kWh (kilowatt hour) is 1 unit, so if you have an appliance that uses 500W, it'll use 1 unit every two hours.

Alternatively, if you're trying to be green, divide the power usage (W) by the Power Factor to give the true amount of electricity that needs to be generated ('inductive loads' like power supplies and fluorescent lamps often have power factors less than 1) whilst 'resistive loads' like heaters, cookers and filament bulbs will have power factors of 1.


Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe domestic users in the UK are only charged for the resistive power they use (KW) as opposed to reactive (KVA) hence no need to consider the power factor, just look at the watts to determine how much you will be charged.
#10
MrFizzy
Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe domestic users in the UK are only charged for the resistive power they use (KW) as opposed to reactive (KVA) hence no need to consider the power factor, just look at the watts to determine how much you will be charged.


These plug in one can calculate the power factor.
The owl type ones that clamp around the cables between your meter and consumer unit (Fuse box) can't detect the voltage or power factor so are not as accurate.
#11
Alternatively just turn **** off when you are not using it! Its not difficult! ;-)
#12
Thay are useful to check to see if things like fridges and freezers are working correctly - a fridge or freezer can waste a huge amount of power if they are not running properly!
#13
MrFizzy
Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe domestic users in the UK are only charged for the resistive power they use (KW) as opposed to reactive (KVA) hence no need to consider the power factor, just look at the watts to determine how much you will be charged.


Sure; that's why I prefaced the bit about PF with 'if you're trying to be green...'

KW is indeed all you need to consider (for now, anyway) if all you're concerned about is your bill. KVA is what you need to consider if you additionally care about how much demand you're placing upon the electricity generation infrastructure and its feedstock.
#14
cowbutt
Sure; that's why I prefaced the bit about PF with 'if you're trying to be green...'

KW is indeed all you need to consider (for now, anyway) if all you're concerned about is your bill. KVA is what you need to consider if you additionally care about how much demand you're placing upon the electricity generation infrastructure and its feedstock.


reckon it would be of some help to turn off such devices during times of power cuts? or use devices that don't hog so much power? my first hearing of power factor was some free energy dude going on about a power factor greater than 1, and that was using lightbulbs. his transformer pulled in energy from the zero point I believe.
1 Like #15
bingowings85
reckon it would be of some help to turn off such devices during times of power cuts? or use devices that don't hog so much power?


Generally, the power used by resistive loads (cookers, electric showers and not to mention those using electric heating) is much more than that used by inductive loads, which, combined with the difficulty of measuring it using ye olde fashioned meters, probably explains why the electricity companies only bill KW used , rather than KVA.

When "smart meters" come along, we may all find we're being billed for KVA used rather than KW. Which is fairer, in a way. Of course, one would hope the cost-per-KVA will be lower than the old cost-per-KW, since it won't have to subsidise those customers with larger-than-average inductive loads.

As for improving PF, best to shop around for more efficient appliances when they need replacing. An example of this is PC power supplies; they used to be shockingly inefficient, but have improved and the '80 Plus Bronze/Silver/Gold' certified models are the best examples.
#16
cowbutt
Generally, the power used by resistive loads (cookers, electric showers and not to mention those using electric heating) is much more than that used by inductive loads, which, combined with the difficulty of measuring it using ye olde fashioned meters, probably explains why the electricity companies only bill KW used , rather than KVA.

When "smart meters" come along, we may all find we're being billed for KVA used rather than KW. Which is fairer, in a way. Of course, one would hope the cost-per-KVA will be lower than the old cost-per-KW, since it won't have to subsidise those customers with larger-than-average inductive loads.

As for improving PF, best to shop around for more efficient appliances when they need replacing. An example of this is PC power supplies; they used to be shockingly inefficient, but have improved and the '80 Plus Bronze/Silver/Gold' certified models are the best examples.


It would be great for somebody to run the conversion numbers for each household so that the transition from KW to KVA is seamless and fair as possible? I do remember reading about a hyperthetical experiment which would really annoy the electricity supplier - connect up capacitors in series(?), current would be taken and eventually returned to the board but you wouldn't be billed for such current because it was reactive.

perhaps in some old nostalgic way we'll remember the inefficient power grid with fond memories. :whistling:
#17
to stress a point as to how useful monitoring your energy consumption is..

in a year & looking at like for like quarters, we have used 50 % less electricity than last winter so far... not freezing, warmer, just more sensible about radiator placement, & turning stuff off, .like the microwave when not using things.

I really don't understand why wet rads etc are placed under windows for heat to pour out having never heated anything, since turning ours off & re-locating the rad (as well as a bit of temporary insulation against an outer wall our house heating is far less prone to cold, more evenly heated & minimal.
Our use of a winters worth of wood fuel in an efficient woodburning stove has so far only resulted in a large bag of fine ash, compared to our old open fire which had a nigh on negative effect to heating the house!


Back on track though the owl monitors are deemed to be a guide only, being up to 10 % + / - within range of useage, so regardless will help you no end.
(as will a few good fleeces & a wooly hat)

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