Espresso/Cappuccino Maker @ Aldi £50 - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit
58Expired

Espresso/Cappuccino Maker @ Aldi £50.00

great-deals Avatar
5y, 11m agoFound 5 years, 11 months ago
http://www.aldi.co.uk/uk/html/offers/special_buys3_16843.htm

Brews strong espresso and foaming cappuccino in true Italian fashion.

* Stainless steel housing and panel
* Silver keep warm plate for warming cups (approx. 17.5 x 16cm)
* Stainless steel drip tray
* 3 way switch (espresso, stand-by and steam)
* Swingable steam nozzle with foam function – can also be used for preparing hot water
* 15 bar pump
* Crema system
* Pre-brew function
* Stainless steel filter for 1 and 2 cups
* Detachable water tank with capacity approx. 1.7 litres
* Dimensions approx. 20.5 x 29 x 32cm
* Cord length visible approx. 80cm
More From ALDI:
×
Get the Hottest Deals Daily
Stay informed. Once a day, we'll send you the deals our members voted as the best.
Failed
great-deals Avatar
5y, 11m agoFound 5 years, 11 months ago
Options

All Comments

(24) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
Think you mean Aldi. LOL. good deal though.

Edited By: jeano on Dec 20, 2010 23:28: forgot to put good deal.
1 Like #2
http://www.aldi.co.uk/uk/media/offers/01_10_week_51/Product_detail_Wk51T11.jpg
#3
Oooh, I love my coffee! Might get one of these for myself, an extra xmas pressie!!!!
#4
CogZog
Oooh, I love my coffee! Might get one of these for myself, an extra xmas pressie!!!!


Seems pretty reasonable for the money. Not a professional but what you expect for £50.00.
#5
ugly would rather spend a bit more on something decent or for now just stick to my cafetierre

Edited By: royals on Dec 21, 2010 00:03
3 Likes #6
This looks like quite a good machine to get you started, but getting a decent espresso can be quite tricky (but very, very rewarding when you get it right).

A few tips to get the most out of any espresso machine:
- Make sure the machine is well warmed up before using it and use fresh (ideally filtered) water.
- Leave the portafilter (the handle and filter basket part) in whilst the machine warms up
- You need a much finer grind than for a normal coffee machine or cafetiere/french press.
- Ideally you should freshly grind the beans just before use with a burr grinder (NOT a blade grinder)
- If you don't have a burr grinder make sure you buy coffee that's labelled as an espresso (fine) grind
- Hasbean (http://www.hasbean.co.uk/) do some lovely coffees which they roast daily and will send either as whole beans or ground for different types of machine for no extra charge.
- fill the filter basket so the coffee is level with the top then 'tamp; or press the coffee down into the filter ensuring that it's evenly spread (starter machines normally come with a simple plastic tamper which is just a plastic disk that fits snugly inside the filter basket for pressing down the coffee)
- Don't worr if your coffee doesn't come out right there are several factors (such as temperature, fineness of grind and how hard you tamp) that you'll need to keep experimenting with until you get the perfect cup
- Keep the machine and all parts clean, especially the filter basket and the 'shower screen' (the holey metal plate above where the portafilter goes, where the water comes out)
- Descale regularly (about once every 1-2 months depending on the hardness of your water)
- Start saving - if you get it right I guarantee you'll want an burr grinder and a more expensive machine within 12 months, good espresso is quite addictive!

There's a good forum here, but some of the people on here spend literally thousands on their stuff so don't be put off.
#7
Although having purchased one if the Aldi machines for work previously I can confirm that all of the above is pretty pointless because you'll never get a great coffee out of this. And forget frothing milk because the steam capacity is tiny.

Also if people are spending 50 on a coffee machine how many are going to want to spend AT LEAST the same again on a burr grinder.
#8
nomad01
Although having purchased one if the Aldi machines for work previously I can confirm that all of the above is pretty pointless because you'll never get a great coffee out of this. And forget frothing milk because the steam capacity is tiny.

Also if people are spending 50 on a coffee machine how many are going to want to spend AT LEAST the same again on a burr grinder.


Idealistic tripe!

Been using a 40 quid Delonghi machine for YEARS, with pre-ground coffee, and it still tastes lightyears ahead of anything I have EVER had in a cafe, where an 8,000 Quid machine gets used to brew some cheap coffee bought at the cash & carry, by someone on minimum wage who wouldn't know instant coffee from tea bags, and then proceeds to heat the milk so hot it COOKS it!

I can froth milk to the point of it busting through the kitchen door too, don't doubt this will be any different.

A lot of "Emperor's clothes" when it comes to coffee machines.
Yes, you get improvement the more you pay, but just like Hifi gear, the returns get VERY slight as expense increases exponentially.

A machine like this will take a good bit of practice to use, so don't bother unless you are willing to spend the time to get it to work well, but if you do, odds on it will produce coffee better than you can buy!
#9
nihcaj

Idealistic tripe!Been using a 40 quid Delonghi machine for YEARS, with pre-ground coffee, and it still tastes lightyears ahead of anything I have EVER had in a cafe, where an 8,000 Quid machine gets used to brew some cheap coffee bought at the cash & carry, by someone on minimum wage who wouldn't know instant coffee from tea bags, and then proceeds to heat the milk so hot it COOKS it!I can froth milk to the point of it busting through the kitchen door too, don't doubt this will be any different.A lot of "Emperor's clothes" when it comes to coffee machines.Yes, you get improvement the more you pay, but just like Hifi gear, the returns get VERY slight as expense increases exponentially.A machine like this will take a good bit of practice to use, so don't bother unless you are willing to spend the time to get it to work well, but if you do, odds on it will produce coffee better than you can buy!


Sorry... uneducated tripe in response doesn't make you right.

I've owned almost a dozen coffee machines over the years and the Aldi one was by far the worst.

How does owning a Delonghi make you an expert on ALL cheap espresso machines??

While it's true that the difference in home machines of a certain cost is negligible unless you're willing to pay for a pro machine (which I also owned... together with a coffee shop/cafe that it lived in) it's also true that many if not most sub 100 quid machines don't perform as well as the Gaggias and Rancillios that cost nearer 300. That's a fact.
#10
I started off with a cheapish Russell Hobbs machine and using pre-ground coffee. After playing around for a while I was able to get reasonably consistent shots that (made with decent coffee) were better than most you'll get in a high street coffee shop.

After about 6 months I bought a burr grinder that allowed me more control over the shots and gave me a fresher grind. Eventually when that machine died after about 18 months (of pretty hard service!) I bit the bullet and got a Gaggia Classic.

To be honest I think the Russell Hobbs one was probably easier to get a half-decent shot out of than my Gaggia, but when I get everything right on my Gaggia then it's a noticeably better shot (with a much better crema). The Gaggia is also much more robustly built and you can get spares and clean and service it more readily.

Whilst sometimes I hanker after a fancier machine and a better grinder, realistically I think I've got the right level of set up for my needs now. I don't regret the purchase of my cheap original machine though as it was a really good introduction and helped me to decide what I really wanted.
#11
nomad01
Sorry... uneducated tripe in response doesn't make you right.

I've owned almost a dozen coffee machines over the years and the Aldi one was by far the worst.

How does owning a Delonghi make you an expert on ALL cheap espresso machines??

While it's true that the difference in home machines of a certain cost is negligible unless you're willing to pay for a pro machine (which I also owned... together with a coffee shop/cafe that it lived in) it's also true that many if not most sub 100 quid machines don't perform as well as the Gaggias and Rancillios that cost nearer 300. That's a fact.


Where did I say I have owned one Delonhgi machine? I have owned a lot more than that, however I replaced a much more expensive machine with a 40 quid Delohngi just like one I had previously owned one when it packed in, as it performed FAR better than that a few other models I had inbetween!

Your assumption that I am uneducated is clearly based on simple lack of knowledge, indicating your comments in this case are both idealistic AND uneducated.
#12
beardyweirdy
I started off with a cheapish Russell Hobbs machine and using pre-ground coffee. After playing around for a while I was able to get reasonably consistent shots that (made with decent coffee) were better than most you'll get in a high street coffee shop.

After about 6 months I bought a burr grinder that allowed me more control over the shots and gave me a fresher grind. Eventually when that machine died after about 18 months (of pretty hard service!) I bit the bullet and got a Gaggia Classic.

To be honest I think the Russell Hobbs one was probably easier to get a half-decent shot out of than my Gaggia, but when I get everything right on my Gaggia then it's a noticeably better shot (with a much better crema). The Gaggia is also much more robustly built and you can get spares and clean and service it more readily.

Whilst sometimes I hanker after a fancier machine and a better grinder, realistically I think I've got the right level of set up for my needs now. I don't regret the purchase of my cheap original machine though as it was a really good introduction and helped me to decide what I really wanted.


A Russell Hobbs machine was the WORST I have owned. So unreliable, I never got a cup of drinkable coffee out of it, and it went back! Unfortunately true of just about every Russell Hobbs product, not a coffee machine issue, just plain unreliability!
#13
Yes, yes - but what about the current Aldi machine? Has anyone actually bought one and tried it out?!

Edited By: dhoneyjones on Dec 24, 2010 13:32
1 Like #14
Yes, we bought one of these two days ago. The machine is excellent. Good quality, looks well, not cheap at all. And considering the price: much better than expected!

Now, the espresso: We only used Lavazza (black packing, pre-ground, as sold in supermarkets) so far and the taste is far superior to everything that I can get in the UK in most cafes, restaurants and hotels. Certainly better than $$$bucks which does not mean a lot, but Nero and Costa are better (if only because their beans are superior to the Lavazza consumer packages). Almost perfect crema. I was genuinely astonished.

Cappuccino: The milk frothing works to almost perfect results. If I wanted, I could add a big mountain of froth over the cup (which is of course NOT the ideal head on a capp).

Yes, the steam lance is a bit close to the machine, but one can manage. Put the machine in a good position, and it works.

The comparison of the previous poster with High End Hifi is fitting and I agree with what Nomad sais above. And yes, one can do it better with a £500 Gaggia, but the 900% extra cost bring only 5-20% improvement.

Having said that, a lot of the result depends on the skill of the person using the machine. But this can easily be acquired. And the same would be necessary if one had a more expensive machine.

Most meagre results are caused by wrong type/quality of used coffee, lack or too much of stamping of the coffee in the basket, and for milk froth: fat content and temperature of the used milk. Cold full-fat milk will get you the typical Italian smooth but sticky consistence of the froth.

Recommendation: BUY (if not yet sold out, our Aldi had only two left on its first day of sale, however, the offers are repeated at Aldi every couple of months).
#15
I have had this machine for nearly 2 weeks now and can honestly say, it makes great coffee. Having had several machines through the years, my latest being a mid range delonghi which started to leak water out of one of the tanks at just five months old, very disappointing. The Aldi model definently makes a better coffee, the crema is the best I've ever seen and the milk frothing arm is so strong I am, for the first time, able to do latte art. Not the defining extra you want granted but a nice perk. The build is very sturdy and I estimate for all it's features, it's on par with a £100 machine. Maybe better but I'm being conservative. There are two main downsides though and this could be a clincher for a lot of people, IT'S VERY NOISY! and it 'dumps' a lot, as in after swtiching from coffee to off, it dumps what's in the boiler, refills itself ready for the frother and the same when turning that off. This means its gets through so much water and 2 big drinks later, no more water left in tank and one full drip tray. It does make a better coffe for doing this though so it's a sacrifice I'm happy with till I can move on to better things. What I wanted cost £500 which I didn't have so in the meantime, £50 was a much better spend for a very impressive machine.
#16
After lots of research and probably very late as bound to be none left at Aldi's now, I am pretty much convinced this is a rebadged/slightly refronted Dualit 84200 Espressivo. I've checked out loads of reviews and all the comments tie in with my experiences with the machine. All the buttons are the same, the two side ones on the Aldi being either side of the controller on the Dualit. All other componants are the same, even the drip tray design, the specs are the same and as Dualit have stopped selling them officially on their website, so it's got me thinking even more. The reviews do slate it in some places though, hence why it may be off the Dualit website now. Another site still sells it for £159.95 so with a £110 saving, I'm prepared to put up with it's little quirks. Quite pleased and if it comes up again at Aldi, it's well worth anyones £50.

Edited By: cinemalouise on Jan 05, 2011 14:13
#17
Well - we bought one too. Had it for about 2 weeks now - and it's great! We've tried Expresso/Cappuccino machines before - admittedly a good few years ago - and never had much success. This machine does the business - great cofffee and great milk frothing. If your Aldi store still has stock grab one now! And I agree with 'cinemalouise' - this machine is a dead ringer for the Dualit models - the similarities are no coincidence! Saw them today in John Lewis (OK cheaper from Amazon - I know) for £175.

Edited By: dhoneyjones on Jan 07, 2011 16:18
#18
Well - we bought one too. Had it for about 2 weeks now - and it's great! We've tried Expresso/Cappuccino machines before - admittedly a good few yeras ago - and never had much success. This machine does the business - great cofffee and great milk frothing. If your Aldi store still has stock grab one now! And I agree with 'cinemalouise' - this machine is a dead ringer for the Dualit models - the similarities are no coincidence! Saw them today in John Lewis (OK cheaper from Amazon - I know) for £175.
#19
I just bought one of these yesterday, so still some stock left. The only downside I've found so far is it vibrates a bit in use and my cup moves gradually forwards, so I'm holding it to avoid broken china. It produces a good crema, has a good size water tank and the frothing nozzle is easy to clean. Looks good for the money.
#20
I just bought this coffee machine and i am very pleased with it .It has two sizes of baskets one for one cup and one for two cups as i like my coffee strong i use the double one for one cup and found it to be perfect.The steamer makes great foam and is fairly quick and easy to use .It also looks good in the kitchen not cheap looking at all .It gets the thumbs up from me !!
#21
After having had a £350 machine made by Pavoni which was useless followed by 3 (three) machines made by De Longi 2 of which were replacements after breakdowns, I now have the Aldi version purchased 4 months ago. I can only say it's just brilliant. I only use ground coffee as I will not buy capsules from Nestle. The results are second to none. Go and get one if they are still around you will not regret it.
#22
AS ANYBODY GOT THE DELTA 3 IN ONE COFFEE MACHINE FROM ALDI, MY SISTER NEEDS TO KNOW WERE TO GET THE COFFEE ETC FROM, THANK YOU,
#23
Would like to know where to return my Delta espresso coffee machine as the frother is not working I live in Ireland.
#24
edana
AS ANYBODY GOT THE DELTA 3 IN ONE COFFEE MACHINE FROM ALDI, MY SISTER NEEDS TO KNOW WERE TO GET THE COFFEE ETC FROM, THANK YOU,
anywhere !
edana
AS ANYBODY GOT THE DELTA 3 IN ONE COFFEE MACHINE FROM ALDI, MY SISTER NEEDS TO KNOW WERE TO GET THE COFFEE ETC FROM, THANK YOU,
anywhere ! just look for expresso any brand any supermarket or nespresso pods aldi and lidl sell thir own ,hope this helps

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Top of Page
Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!