External Battery for iPhone, iPod (1900 mAh) - Silver/White £5.99 @ 7dayshop - HotUKDeals
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*****EDIT 28/8 now 6.99 and back instock
*****EDIT 2/8/10: The white version is now changed status to "on order" i.e. not in stock.

The black version is still available at £7.99

http://www.7dayshop.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=777_12&products_id=107211

I think its an updated version as it has an extra charging light which indicates when its full.

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Good for emergencies and for some reason this white version is cheaper than the black version!

******
High Capacity Emergency Power Bank/External Battery for iPhone, iPod (1900 mAh) - Silver/White


Supplies uninterrupted power to your iPhone/iPod.
Charge the internal battery through the iPod USB cable or AC adapter (Charging time around 2 Hours)
. Battery Capacity: 3.7V / 1900mAh
. Input: 5V 500mAh
. Output: 5V 500mAh
. Size:67*62*15mm
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All Comments

(35) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
do you know if these will completely recharge the intenal battery?
2 Likes #2
Yes they do punk, You plug the external battery into your cable and it charges then once charged you can take it with you and if your iPhone starts running down you just plug it into the bottom of the phone and it will start to charge your iphone.
1 Like #3
The iphone 4 battery is 1420 mAh so should charge it fully and a bit more. (3G has 1150mAh and 3GS has 1219mAh for comparison).
2 Likes #4
Similar to this but in Black and with slightly higher charging output current (theoretically should make charging a bit faster) for ~ 50p extra http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.42620
#5
thanks ripper & zaft 8)
#6
how does it charge without electricity??

yes i am aware that was probably a stupid question!!
#7
you charge the pack via cable either through your USB or wall socket once charged you take it anywhere with you lol
#8
Thanks
#9
I'm not convinced this will fully charge the iphone.... I have a 3gs and a 1000mah external battery and it only charges my battery to 20%.... so with 1900mah, that should only be like 40ish....
#10
will it fit in with the bumper on?
#11
thats a good idea! I am always charging mine and forgetting to charge it
#12
Not buying a 3rd party charger again... Paid £30 for my last one and it now says "not supported" when i plug into phone.
#13
Works well with my iphone 4
#14
had one of these for a while..works really well and will fully charge a 3G
#15
got one for my 3gs, really handy get a full charge and a few percent after that(maybe the 15% mark) heat!
#16
skyrocket
had one of these for a while..works really well and will fully charge a 3G


Had? What do you use now?
#17
Many thanks OP. Should come in handy for festivals etc. Thanks to others for comfirming it will recharge the internal battery fully.
#18
It wont make charging any faster. mAh is the CAPACITY of the battery. A device wont take anymore amps than is required. If you look at the specs its output is 500mAh. 500mAh is the maximum a USB port can outpuit, so in a nutshell this will recharge your iPhone at the same rate as plugging it into a USB cable.

Basically it just means in this case that you should get one and a bit charges out of it. Im not going to check the specs for the iPhone but if you people have your specs right its around 1.5 charges.
#19
Had the black version but it didn't work with my 3gs
#20
If I charged it and kept it in my bag, how long would it hold a charge for?
#21
Thats all down to build quality and its environment. Youd have to buy it, try it and then when the cold weather comes around it will be less. Should hold its charge for several weeks Id imagine. Also if it doesnt come in a plastic case Id invest in one.
#22
Cackles
500mAh is the maximum a USB port can outpuit, so in a nutshell this will recharge your iPhone at the same rate as plugging it into a USB cable.


Sorry but USB ports have had the possibility of outputting 1000mA for a while. An now the iPad USB charger even dumps out a cool 2A. iPhones have been able to use this to charge up much faster.

If the dealextreme charger can actually output 800mA as it says (not the first time they would lie) it would charge the iPhone faster than this one.

Edited By: jmarcelino on Aug 01, 2010 00:43: refer to dx charger
#23
jmarcelino
Cackles
500mAh is the maximum a USB port can outpuit, so in a nutshell this will recharge your iPhone at the same rate as plugging it into a USB cable.
Sorry but USB ports have had the possibility of outputting 1000mA for a while. An now the iPad USB charger even dumps out a cool 2A. iPhones have been able to use this to charge up much faster.If the dealextreme charger can actually output 800mA as it says (not the first time they would lie) it would charge the iPhone faster than this one.

I think you might want to recheck your info on that, no in fact you definately want to. A USB connection supplies 2 x 500mA so it adds up to an amp, but single USB ports only deliver 500. There is a very simple reason why, there is no need to have a single USB deliver anymore than that because when USB ports were standardised 500 was the standard. They CANNOT make USB devices that take anymore than 500 from a single port otherwise all over the planet peoples mobos would start to fry.

In theory the USB ports 'have the possibilty' of outputing what they want as long as the parts are there. For example a motherboard maker could make one with 2.5A ... but no one would make a device for it ... unless it was a bespoke setup ...

Even if they said tomorrow '1A per port' no one would risk building a device for it unless it was a bespoke setup.

Edit:
BTW in case you are thinking of saying 'But the charger is 1A' or 'this charger is 2A for definate' 'they can charge at that rate' 'its the same port' ... well the reason that there are so many pins in the socket is for just that. It is so the phone can sense what type of power supply it is connected to. Some manufacturers use resistors, loopback, different pins for different cycles ... Tell you what, cut the end off a mains supply, wire it to a USB plug, plug said contraption in and watch ze PC go *pop* ... because the phone senses 'max power' and 'max power' fried your mobo.

Edited By: Cackles on Aug 01, 2010 02:28: Ive forgotten more than I know :P
#24
Took one of these to Glastonbury with me this year. Came in very useful. Got around a charge and a half from it i would estimate.

After a week though it did become faulty (connection- had to tilt to get a charge) but my seller on eBay sent another one out. Bonus.
#25
I had this model of charger branded tecknet. From amazon for 13 quid about 4 months ago. It worked with an iPhone 3 gs most of the time, but would occasionally decide to stop charging due to being 'incompatible'. this is dirt cheap and fine if you don't mind a bit of fiddling

after 4 months, the connector became unreliable and the unit died, I got a refund.

There is now a newer version with 5 lights on the front( a 5th one in the bottom of the front panel marked 'charged' . This model worked better for me and has given me no comparability issues so far, it also seems a tighter fit.

These are a lifesaver, and for 6 quid you cantcomplain.
#26
I think you might want to recheck your info on that, no in fact you definately want to. A USB connection supplies 2 x 500mA so it adds up to an amp, but single USB ports only deliver 500. There is a very simple reason why, there is no need to have a single USB deliver anymore than that because when USB ports were standardised 500 was the standard. They CANNOT make USB devices that take anymore than 500 from a single port otherwise all over the planet peoples mobos would start to fry.

In theory the USB ports 'have the possibilty' of outputing what they want as long as the parts are there. For example a motherboard maker could make one with 2.5A ... but no one would make a device for it ... unless it was a bespoke setup ...


I think you also need to check your facts..

The USB spec states 500mA max per port however the actual max depends on the power circuitry on the hub or motherboard. All hubs and motherboards have to have over current detection, which detects a device drawing too much current and disables the port. If your plug in device that takes too much current, the operating system will report the fact. Almost all USB hosts that I have come across use power switches that detect over current at 1A. The actual maximum depends on the power circuitry employed, over current detection per-port or per-host. Connecting a device that requires too much current should NOT fry the motherboard!! If it does it is then it is likely to be poorly designed motherboard power circuity.

I work for a company that makes a device that uses ALL the available power on a USB host. If the port can give 2.5A then it uses it, if all it can give is 500mA then it uses that.
#27
hi if you want a black one free post £5.80 ebay
#28
For this price I dont care iif it only lasts a few months, handy for a long haul plane journey as the iphone battery is rubbish. About time the airlines started fitting USB charging points on the seats!
#29
Hot, thanks OP
#30
Cackles

I think you might want to recheck your info on that, no in fact you definately want to. A USB connection supplies 2 x 500mA so it adds up to an amp, but single USB ports only deliver 500.


My info is solid. Read "Battery Charging Specification" available at http://www.usb.org/developers/devclass_docs/batt_charging_1_1.zip

Compliant USB ports (like on a Mac or others) can definitely supply more than 500ma and the iPhone can make full use of this. In ports supplying 1A it charges nearly twice as fast as non battery charging spec compliant 500ma ports. Even faster if you use an iPad charger.

Btw your whole extra Edit: bit makes no sense at all so maybe next time you'd like to invest that
energy into giving other the benefit of doubt and looking it up instead?
#31
dubnuts
I think you might want to recheck your info on that, no in fact you definately want to. A USB connection supplies 2 x 500mA so it adds up to an amp, but single USB ports only deliver 500. There is a very simple reason why, there is no need to have a single USB deliver anymore than that because when USB ports were standardised 500 was the standard. They CANNOT make USB devices that take anymore than 500 from a single port otherwise all over the planet peoples mobos would start to fry.In theory the USB ports 'have the possibilty' of outputing what they want as long as the parts are there. For example a motherboard maker could make one with 2.5A ... but no one would make a device for it ... unless it was a bespoke setup ...
I think you also need to check your facts..The USB spec states 500mA max per port however the actual max depends on the power circuitry on the hub or motherboard. All hubs and motherboards have to have over current detection, which detects a device drawing too much current and disables the port. If your plug in device that takes too much current, the operating system will report the fact. Almost all USB hosts that I have come across use power switches that detect over current at 1A. The actual maximum depends on the power circuitry employed, over current detection per-port or per-host. Connecting a device that requires too much current should NOT fry the motherboard!! If it does it is then it is likely to be poorly designed motherboard power circuity.I work for a company that makes a device that uses ALL the available power on a USB host. If the port can give 2.5A then it uses it, if all it can give is 500mA then it uses that.

So how can you blow a motherboard by shorting the -/+ on a USB port? Shouldnt the mobo detect that?
#32
Cackles

So how can you blow a motherboard by shorting the -/+ on a USB port? Shouldnt the mobo detect that?


El cheapo motherboards do, good ones don't. There's two types of over current protection, one is by software where the OS checks if the power requested by the device is available, other is real over current protection built into the hardware.

Problem is to save $0.01 in power protection circuitry manufacturers might stick with software one. In fact why should they do otherwise when they get more money out of fried motherboards...

Edited By: jmarcelino on Aug 02, 2010 11:06: & symbol messed up the text.
#33
Dont really understand the technical stuff your on about. All i know is this:
My iphone uses a lot of battery.
When this gadget is charged i plug it into the bottom of my iphone and it charges it.
This gadget will charge and charge your phone at same time.
Good price.
#34
Expired, now £6.99
#35
i would say 6.99 is still dam hot, as most of these types of things are £20-30ish. now back in stock, just got an email saying they are dispatching them.

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