Extra Value 550W ATX Silent Neon PSU - £21.99 @ Ebuyer - HotUKDeals
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Very good price for a SILENT 550w power supply in my opinion...

* Braided cable for tidier case/Better Airflow
* Comes with SATA Connector and 20 - 24 Pin Converter
* New Version 1.3/Ver.2.03
* Silent and better ventiliation
* ATX 12V compliant for all kinds of CPU and mainboard
* Input voltage: 115VAC or 230VAC or 115VAC/230VAC
* MTBF 50,000 Hours @ 25 degrees

Cable Connectors:

* 20+4Pin Power Connector
* 6x Molex
* 1x SATA
* ATX12V P4
* PCI-Express Power Connector
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mamboboy Avatar
8y, 3m agoFound 8 years, 3 months ago
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Comments/page:
#1
Alleged specs from a customer review:

+3.3v = 28A
+5v = 35A
+12v = 30A
-5v = 0.5A
-12v = 0.8A
+5vsb = 2.5A
#2
shame about the 1 x sata.
#3
I do not vote.

The PSU doea NOT have genuine 550W.Spec of the PSU is poorer than the 425W Hiper.
I would never buy it.
#4
Rail Stats:

+3.3V +5V +12V -5V -12V +5VSB
28A 35A 20A 0.5A 0.8A 2.5A


Stats from main page - which calculating in my head - look more like 522.4W.
#5
Purchased this about 8 months ago when I built my new PC...

Take this advice:

DONT CUT CORNERS WITH THE PSU!!!

Had to be sent back 5 times, yes, 5 times, because it couldnt keep up with a dual core processor and an 8800gts.
Buy a decent make PSU
#6
At the end of the day most PC's don't need more than a 350W-400W PSU unless you are running multiple graphics cards (if you need to ask then you aren't). Don't buy a cheap high rated PSU cos they may use very poor quality components increasing the risk of them failing and potentially taking out your whole system. You are far better to spend similar cash on a basic branded one such as these:

http://www.scan.co.uk/Product.aspx?WebProductId=820347

http://www.scan.co.uk/Product.aspx?WebProductId=691095

http://www.scan.co.uk/Product.aspx?WebProductId=696393

http://www.scan.co.uk/Product.aspx?WebProductId=143946

http://www.ebuyer.com/product/114928

http://www.ebuyer.com/product/120375

http://www.ebuyer.com/product/132062
#7
Oh and definitely avoid the "free" ones in cases costing around £20 like this:

http://www.ebuyer.com/product/86501
#8
I hate the way these PSUs use the word 'silent' when they clearly have fans.

Silent = 0db - in my opinion!
#9
Wow.... a thread where people who say "You get what you pay for" aren't getting mobbed by people who think that 50p is too much to pay for a PSU :)
#10
Buy a quality PSU instead of a cheap one... Generally speaking you should never buy any PSU claiming a high wattage at a low price, especially if it isn't from an established and reputable brand
#11
mamboboy
Well, i'm running an even cheaper PSU at the moment...the 450w Sumvision one - two years on and not a single problem, and this PC is more or less on 24/7.

I've used them in 2-3 PC's i've built for people too (same specs as yours) and none of them have had anything go wrong. It's the PSU's that come with the cheap cases that I don't trust...after exploding in my face n' all :thinking::w00t:


Personally I think you have to spend a little more than that to get the quality of electrical components that you can rely on for a large number of years. Whilst most people won't have a problem with the cheaper supplies, there will definately be more poor quality control ones blowing up systems and potentially losing all data, etc.

The reason even the cheap PSU's tend to run OK is largely because they run them so far under capacity. A normal dual core system with a decent GPU such as the 8800GTS will only consume about 200W power when running at it's peak, most of the time it will be low 100's. As such you are never really testing the PSU up to the rating.
#12
have to add my 2 cents in on this one as well. I bought this a while back. Simply not good enough to run a Dual Core E2160 and a 8800GT. Lesser systems only i would guess!
#13
Scan do this 700W FSP PSU with 83%+ efficiency & all modern connectors for £27-30 from time to time. I'd go for that anyday over this.

Edit: The connectors are as follows...
4x Molex
4x Sata
2x 6pin PCI-E
2x Floppy
1x 24pin motherboard power
1x 4pin CPU power
#14
Get something quality. The Seasonic 430w can be had for under 40 quid now, and is basically silent to boot (120mm fan).
#15
I doubt whether it is what I would call silent. It might be reasonably quiet.
#16
mamboboy
molex -> sata adapters are fairly cheap - that's how i sorted the problem :thumbsup:


A SATA power cable will supply 5V, 12V and 3.3V but a Molex connector is missing the 3.3V. I believe that few sata drives use 3.3V so it shouldn't be a problem. Anyone know different?
#17
sibeer
Personally I think you have to spend a little more than that to get the quality of electrical components that you can rely on for a large number of years. Whilst most people won't have a problem with the cheaper supplies, there will definately be more poor quality control ones blowing up systems and potentially losing all data, etc.

The reason even the cheap PSU's tend to run OK is largely because they run them so far under capacity. A normal dual core system with a decent GPU such as the 8800GTS will only consume about 200W power when running at it's peak, most of the time it will be low 100's. As such you are never really testing the PSU up to the rating.


I'm a system builder of many years and couldn't have put it better myself!
#18
doberman
A SATA power cable will supply 5V, 12V and 3.3V but a Molex connector is missing the 3.3V. I believe that few sata drives use 3.3V so it shouldn't be a problem. Anyone know different?


To the best of my knowledge this is correct. The 3.3v was for future developments rather than existing ones and helps with the 'hotplugging' feature of SATA drives, but drive manufacturers seemed to have dropped off support with the current crop of available drives. However, I'm certainly not claiming to have expert knowledge on this and would welcome other people's contributions.
#19
sibeer;2843618
Personally I think you have to spend a little more than that to get the quality of electrical components that you can rely on for a large number of years. Whilst most people won't have a problem with the cheaper supplies, there will definately be more poor quality control ones blowing up systems and potentially losing all data, etc.

The reason even the cheap PSU's tend to run OK is largely because they run them so far under capacity. A normal dual core system with a decent GPU such as the 8800GTS will only consume about 200W power when running at it's peak, most of the time it will be low 100's. As such you are never really testing the PSU up to the rating.

Quite true. The thing is just like my father in law's PC when a PSU goes it can take all of your internal components with it so saving 20 pounds or whatever can cost you a few hundred pounds if your PSU goes.

The other thing is that the better the PSU the more efficient it will be which will save you money on your power bills.
#20
I have a Supermicro twin xeon based server running four threads and sitting quite happily on the (Supermicro) 430W PSU it came with.

However, I am about to swap a RAID array into this one - but think its time to upgrade the PSU.

In the past buying cheap PSUs and shoving in Papst fans has worked well - as invariably failure follows fan failure.
#21
Saw this today and thought of this thread..... it should be pointed out that it's very much true that as this PDF says that PSU's can cause your PC to be very unstable and cause crashes which Windows is invariably blamed for :)
http://www.corsair.com/_appnotes/AN805_Why_a_high_quality_PSU_is_an_essential_purchase.pdf
#22
Don't forget that an energy-efficient psu is worth getting at today's electricity prices. Typically, this can save £5-10 of electricity a year (obviously depends on usage), so the extra cost is easily paid for in the lifetime of the PSU. Meanwhile, you have a better PSU, and you're saving the planet! ;-)
#23
I've had this PSU for 10 months and athough it worked fine with a single core processor, it spat its dummy out when I swapped to a quad core and wouldn't run my new gfx card.

Taking into consideration my pc set up, I would say the claimed ratings are very very dubious (particulary the 30A on the 12v rail :?). Would like to get my hands on a multimeter just to see how wrong they are.

For that reason voted cold, spend another £20 and get a branded PSU like Hiper or Corsair.

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