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Field Recorder, Best Audio Recording Android App, half price £1.79

£1.79 @ Google play
The top Audio Recording App on Sale, quality coding by a typically certifiable German sound engineer. Read More
elTuco Avatar
10m, 3w agoFound 10 months, 3 weeks ago
The top Audio Recording App on Sale, quality coding by a typically certifiable German sound engineer.
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(2)
8 Likes
I think you mean 'certified' not 'certifiable'. The latter normally refers to mental health issues. OK, maybe you meant to say that.

PS Thanks for the deal btw, a great one.

Edited By: fairytooth on Aug 27, 2016 20:23
6 Likes
elTuco
Pateo
elTuco

The top Audio Recording App on Sale, quality coding by a typically certifiable German sound engineer.
I have the zoom h1, would this app be anywhere near the recording quality installed on my HTC m8?
If I recall correctly, Zoom H1 sampling rate is 44.1khz and most phones are also the same or 48khz as this guy points out, see below. So basically being a recording management program on a digital recorder (phone), if a better mike is connected on the phone than the H1 mikes (not hard or expensive), the results would be better. He says you can double the sampling rate if connecting a USB (OTG) sound card or box to the phone. But care must be taken to fine tune to avoid noise, in which case it matches the latest H5/H6 doubled rate of H1. But the H5/6 have much better mikes than H1. Future phones will double current sampling rates, and this app will be updated free for life for buyers.
Google auto translate of his German site. Click on "Audio Quality" in left menu:https://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?act=url&depth=1&hl=en&ie=UTF8&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.co.uk&sl=de&tl=en&u=http://www.pfitzingervoicedesign.com/field_recorder/index.html
Original German site:http://pfitzingervoicedesign.com/
Also, IIRC the two free apps I linked are also Raw Wav(e) recorders which can be re-sampled to lower or other MP3 rates. Some recorder apps are MP3 based and compress recordings.

Well, no. That's nonsense.

At 44.1KHz and above, sampling frequency ceases to be an issue. What determines your sound quality is the mic, the quality of the preamp, and the quality of the ADC. To assume that a phone would be better at recording audio than a purpose-built audio recorder just because it has this app (which I doubt uses anything more than just the stock Android audio libraries) is very naive.

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#1

For pros in Film/video/Radio and music/ent industry
as a contingency on you all the time. If you spent tons on Nagra, Tascam, Sennheiser wireless, Rode, Zoom and similar gear, you will be glad to put this on your phone for life with regular updates.

Can connect it to USB OTG to other sound boxes. Good as backup recording just in case your other location devices fail, or run out of battery again. Read reviews for more ideas:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=de.pfitzinger.rec#details-reviews



Also good for professionals
needing to record sound: Secretary, law, writers, surveyors, dictation ...

You can add a lavy mike to it, search on amazon or ebay after you choose one, anything from a tenner to 3 digit prices.

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=lavalier+phone






Edited By: elTuco on Aug 27, 2016 20:15: typo
#2
Any basic freebie sound recorders available?
3 Likes #3
I tested about ten free ones a while back, I only kept these 2 by Sony and Splend:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.splendapps.voicerec

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sonymobile.androidapp.audiorecorder


Edited By: elTuco on Aug 27, 2016 20:10
8 Likes #4
I think you mean 'certified' not 'certifiable'. The latter normally refers to mental health issues. OK, maybe you meant to say that.

PS Thanks for the deal btw, a great one.

Edited By: fairytooth on Aug 27, 2016 20:23
#5
Anyone used this for nature sounds? Wind, rain, streams etc? If so, is it any good?

Thank you.
#6
or how about recording what your better half is upto.
1 Like #7

Thanx, and thanx OP too. :-)
1 Like #8
purchased - thanks - looking forward to how it may improve stock app on Galaxy....
2 Likes #9
Isn't own to the quality of the phone's microphone more than anything?
1 Like #10
elTuco

The top Audio Recording App on Sale, quality coding by a typically certifiable German sound engineer.
I have the zoom h1, would this app be anywhere near the recording quality installed on my HTC m8?
2 Likes #11
Pateo
elTuco

The top Audio Recording App on Sale, quality coding by a typically certifiable German sound engineer.
I have the zoom h1, would this app be anywhere near the recording quality installed on my HTC m8?


If I recall correctly, Zoom H1 sampling rate is 44.1khz and most phones are also the same or 48khz as this guy points out, see below. So basically being a recording management program on a digital recorder (phone), if a better mike is connected on the phone than the H1 mikes (not hard or expensive), the results would be better. He says you can double the sampling rate if connecting a USB (OTG) sound card or box to the phone. But care must be taken to fine tune to avoid noise, in which case it matches the latest H5/H6 doubled rate of H1. But the H5/6 have much better mikes than H1. Future phones will double current sampling rates, and this app will be updated free for life for buyers.

Google auto translate of his German site. Click on "Audio Quality" in left menu:
https://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?act=url&depth=1&hl=en&ie=UTF8&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.co.uk&sl=de&tl=en&u=http://www.pfitzingervoicedesign.com/field_recorder/index.html

Original German site:
http://pfitzingervoicedesign.com/

Also, IIRC the two free apps I linked are also Raw Wav(e) recorders which can be re-sampled to lower or other MP3 rates. Some recorder apps are MP3 based and compress recordings.
1 Like #12
Have used RecForge Pro for quite a while but will check this out. Thanks.
1 Like #13
Purchased, this looks like it has the kitchen sink too.
I liked RecForge for the voice activated record with x seconds buffer beforehand and y seconds buffer afterwards and records direct to ogg or mp3.
I hope this app can do the same.
Thanjs for letting me know.
#14
If I remember correctly, there is a guy in reviews who says he uses it to dictate to Dragon Pro. (from Nuance) voice recog/dictation software with auto start/stop by recording on the phone then transferring the file to PC for Dragon, or something like that. So must be a way.
#15
Can you record calls on this without restriction on call length? I often take briefings from clients that need to be recorded.
6 Likes #16
elTuco
Pateo
elTuco

The top Audio Recording App on Sale, quality coding by a typically certifiable German sound engineer.
I have the zoom h1, would this app be anywhere near the recording quality installed on my HTC m8?
If I recall correctly, Zoom H1 sampling rate is 44.1khz and most phones are also the same or 48khz as this guy points out, see below. So basically being a recording management program on a digital recorder (phone), if a better mike is connected on the phone than the H1 mikes (not hard or expensive), the results would be better. He says you can double the sampling rate if connecting a USB (OTG) sound card or box to the phone. But care must be taken to fine tune to avoid noise, in which case it matches the latest H5/H6 doubled rate of H1. But the H5/6 have much better mikes than H1. Future phones will double current sampling rates, and this app will be updated free for life for buyers.
Google auto translate of his German site. Click on "Audio Quality" in left menu:https://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?act=url&depth=1&hl=en&ie=UTF8&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.co.uk&sl=de&tl=en&u=http://www.pfitzingervoicedesign.com/field_recorder/index.html
Original German site:http://pfitzingervoicedesign.com/
Also, IIRC the two free apps I linked are also Raw Wav(e) recorders which can be re-sampled to lower or other MP3 rates. Some recorder apps are MP3 based and compress recordings.

Well, no. That's nonsense.

At 44.1KHz and above, sampling frequency ceases to be an issue. What determines your sound quality is the mic, the quality of the preamp, and the quality of the ADC. To assume that a phone would be better at recording audio than a purpose-built audio recorder just because it has this app (which I doubt uses anything more than just the stock Android audio libraries) is very naive.
1 Like #17
whats the point if most phones have **** mic's?
#18
Anyone recommend a good/similar iOS app?
1 Like #19
Ve have ways of recording your sounds!
1 Like #20
donbarney
whats the point if most phones have **** mic's?

Post #1 answers your question, see the Youtube link he provided.
1 Like #21
dewonderful
Isn't own to the quality of the phone's microphone more than anything?

Post #1 see the Youtube link he provided.
1 Like #22
Purchased! Thanks elTuco!
#24
Doesn't record phone calls automatically.

At least you can download and use for 2 hours as a trial. Google will refund with the 2 hours.
#25
dxx
elTuco
Pateo
elTuco

The top Audio Recording App on Sale, quality coding by a typically certifiable German sound engineer.
I have the zoom h1, would this app be anywhere near the recording quality installed on my HTC m8?
If I recall correctly, Zoom H1 sampling rate is 44.1khz and most phones are also the same or 48khz as this guy points out, see below. So basically being a recording management program on a digital recorder (phone), if a better mike is connected on the phone than the H1 mikes (not hard or expensive), the results would be better. He says you can double the sampling rate if connecting a USB (OTG) sound card or box to the phone. But care must be taken to fine tune to avoid noise, in which case it matches the latest H5/H6 doubled rate of H1. But the H5/6 have much better mikes than H1. Future phones will double current sampling rates, and this app will be updated free for life for buyers.
Google auto translate of his German site. Click on "Audio Quality" in left menu:https://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?act=url&depth=1&hl=en&ie=UTF8&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.co.uk&sl=de&tl=en&u=http://www.pfitzingervoicedesign.com/field_recorder/index.html
Original German site:http://pfitzingervoicedesign.com/
Also, IIRC the two free apps I linked are also Raw Wav(e) recorders which can be re-sampled to lower or other MP3 rates. Some recorder apps are MP3 based and compress recordings.
Well, no. That's nonsense.
At 44.1KHz and above, sampling frequency ceases to be an issue. What determines your sound quality is the mic, the quality of the preamp, and the quality of the ADC. To assume that a phone would be better at recording audio than a purpose-built audio recorder just because it has this app (which I doubt uses anything more than just the stock Android audio libraries) is very naive.

In fact, your own 3 statements are moronic. Here's why.

1) If there is no point in developing any sampling rate above your mystical magical cartoonish threshold of 44khz, then you should publish a peer reviewed paper and wait for your Nobel prize. Of course that's a very stupid thing to say.

2) The sound quality is not just based on those few things, but many more factors, hardware software firmware and real world permutation of factors when recording not to mention post production. Not just the silly few commandments you set in stone after you woke up today. Again silly.

3) To say any sound recorder, of any quality or era etc, is better than any digital recorder (a phone in this case and software) plus any microphone of even highest quality levels, is again an announcement that basically says the person has no basic common sense or intelligence. And that's what you said gringo.

Now you're the type of guy, and we love guys like you, that makes such silly Billy sweeping generalisations which are nonsense and entertains and no doubt will try to divert with a lot of waffle. But I will quote the above three basic logical points again. Finally I'd say if you address people out of the blue with a little bit more civility, your life will be a little less painful in future mi amigo. Have a good weekend. ;)
4 Likes #26
elTuco
dxx
elTuco
Pateo
elTuco

The top Audio Recording App on Sale, quality coding by a typically certifiable German sound engineer.
I have the zoom h1, would this app be anywhere near the recording quality installed on my HTC m8?
If I recall correctly, Zoom H1 sampling rate is 44.1khz and most phones are also the same or 48khz as this guy points out, see below. So basically being a recording management program on a digital recorder (phone), if a better mike is connected on the phone than the H1 mikes (not hard or expensive), the results would be better. He says you can double the sampling rate if connecting a USB (OTG) sound card or box to the phone. But care must be taken to fine tune to avoid noise, in which case it matches the latest H5/H6 doubled rate of H1. But the H5/6 have much better mikes than H1. Future phones will double current sampling rates, and this app will be updated free for life for buyers.
Google auto translate of his German site. Click on "Audio Quality" in left menu:https://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?act=url&depth=1&hl=en&ie=UTF8&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.co.uk&sl=de&tl=en&u=http://www.pfitzingervoicedesign.com/field_recorder/index.html
Original German site:http://pfitzingervoicedesign.com/
Also, IIRC the two free apps I linked are also Raw Wav(e) recorders which can be re-sampled to lower or other MP3 rates. Some recorder apps are MP3 based and compress recordings.
Well, no. That's nonsense.
At 44.1KHz and above, sampling frequency ceases to be an issue. What determines your sound quality is the mic, the quality of the preamp, and the quality of the ADC. To assume that a phone would be better at recording audio than a purpose-built audio recorder just because it has this app (which I doubt uses anything more than just the stock Android audio libraries) is very naive.
In fact, your own 3 statements are moronic. Here's why.
1) If there is no point in developing any sampling rate above your mystical magical cartoonish threshold of 44khz, then you should publish a peer reviewed paper and wait for your Nobel prize. Of course that's a very stupid thing to say.
2) The sound quality is not just based on those few things, but many more factors, hardware software firmware and real world permutation of factors when recording not to mention post production. Not just the silly few commandments you set in stone after you woke up today. Again silly.
3) To say any sound recorder, of any quality or era etc, is better than any digital recorder (a phone in this case and software) plus any microphone of even highest quality levels, is again an announcement that basically says the person has no basic common sense or intelligence. And that's what you said gringo.
Now you're the type of guy, and we love guys like you, that makes such silly Billy sweeping generalisations which are nonsense and entertains and no doubt will try to divert with a lot of waffle. But I will quote the above three basic logical points again. Finally I'd say if you address people out of the blue with a little bit more civility, your life will be a little less painful in future mi amigo. Have a good weekend. ;)

Oh dear. Well, I can see why you went on the offensive with this post.

1) The 'magical cartoonish threshold' of 44.1KHz is not mine, it is from a man named Harry Nyquist. You may be familiar with his work. If you aren't, you should read up on it; it's kind-of an essential if you have any interest in audio engineering. You should also read up on the ramifications of recording at above 44.1KHz.

2) Obviously, recording quality is dependent on lots of factors, but I listed only the top three because they were a bit more relevant and meaningful than just the sampling frequency, which was all you mentioned. Incidentally, I'm not sure why you list post production as one of the things that impact recording quality, or why you mention something as trivial as firmware but not as significant as bit depth.

3) Obviously, I'm talking within a comparable sort of context. Ie. a Zoom H1 against a modern smartphone. I think you're being a bit too silly here.

On the note of civility, you should probably try to heed your own message. You've clearly got a very high opinion of your own knowledge and a very fragile ego, and I suspect that's why you replied to my message, which merely disagreed with you and didn't resort to insults (like yours), with such hostility.

You should grow up a bit. And learn a bit more about audio engineering.
#27
dxx
elTuco
dxx
elTuco
Pateo
elTuco

The top Audio Recording App on Sale, quality coding by a typically certifiable German sound engineer.
I have the zoom h1, would this app be anywhere near the recording quality installed on my HTC m8?
If I recall correctly, Zoom H1 sampling rate is 44.1khz and most phones are also the same or 48khz as this guy points out, see below. So basically being a recording management program on a digital recorder (phone), if a better mike is connected on the phone than the H1 mikes (not hard or expensive), the results would be better. He says you can double the sampling rate if connecting a USB (OTG) sound card or box to the phone. But care must be taken to fine tune to avoid noise, in which case it matches the latest H5/H6 doubled rate of H1. But the H5/6 have much better mikes than H1. Future phones will double current sampling rates, and this app will be updated free for life for buyers.
Google auto translate of his German site. Click on "Audio Quality" in left menu:https://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?act=url&depth=1&hl=en&ie=UTF8&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.co.uk&sl=de&tl=en&u=http://www.pfitzingervoicedesign.com/field_recorder/index.html
Original German site:http://pfitzingervoicedesign.com/
Also, IIRC the two free apps I linked are also Raw Wav(e) recorders which can be re-sampled to lower or other MP3 rates. Some recorder apps are MP3 based and compress recordings.
Well, no. That's nonsense.
At 44.1KHz and above, sampling frequency ceases to be an issue. What determines your sound quality is the mic, the quality of the preamp, and the quality of the ADC. To assume that a phone would be better at recording audio than a purpose-built audio recorder just because it has this app (which I doubt uses anything more than just the stock Android audio libraries) is very naive.
In fact, your own 3 statements are moronic. Here's why.
1) If there is no point in developing any sampling rate above your mystical magical cartoonish threshold of 44khz, then you should publish a peer reviewed paper and wait for your Nobel prize. Of course that's a very stupid thing to say.
2) The sound quality is not just based on those few things, but many more factors, hardware software firmware and real world permutation of factors when recording not to mention post production. Not just the silly few commandments you set in stone after you woke up today. Again silly.
3) To say any sound recorder, of any quality or era etc, is better than any digital recorder (a phone in this case and software) plus any microphone of even highest quality levels, is again an announcement that basically says the person has no basic common sense or intelligence. And that's what you said gringo.
Now you're the type of guy, and we love guys like you, that makes such silly Billy sweeping generalisations which are nonsense and entertains and no doubt will try to divert with a lot of waffle. But I will quote the above three basic logical points again. Finally I'd say if you address people out of the blue with a little bit more civility, your life will be a little less painful in future mi amigo. Have a good weekend. ;)
Oh dear. Well, I can see why you went on the offensive with this post.
1) The 'magical cartoonish threshold' of 44.1KHz is not mine, it is from a man named Harry Nyquist. You may be familiar with his work. If you aren't, you should read up on it; it's kind-of an essential if you have any interest in audio engineering. You should also read up on the ramifications of recording at above 44.1KHz.
2) Obviously, recording quality is dependent on lots of factors, but I listed only the top three because they were a bit more relevant and meaningful than just the sampling frequency, which was all you mentioned. Incidentally, I'm not sure why you list post production as one of the things that impact recording quality, or why you mention something as trivial as firmware but not as significant as bit depth.
3) Obviously, I'm talking within a comparable sort of context. Ie. a Zoom H1 against a modern smartphone. I think you're being a bit too silly here.
On the note of civility, you should probably try to heed your own message. You've clearly got a very high opinion of your own knowledge and a very fragile ego, and I suspect that's why you replied to my message, which merely disagreed with you and didn't resort to insults (like yours), with such hostility.
You should grow up a bit. And learn a bit more about audio engineering.

As predicted waffle and diversion, tell the world and all the engineers and manufacturers to dump anything above 44khz because you and Harry say so. Points 2 and 3, "obviously obviously" excuses putting conditions on your own previous commandments? Obviously you're a loss to the world of politics. Write post #25 a hundred times on your black board. As for the continuing insults, thanks, and try to chill :)
1 Like #28
Interesting conversation about sample rates. I enjoyed this article on that topic.
#29
That's an interesting article. Also the word "quality" is not always an absolute given definition. For example if there is noise on one recorder output but not on another, then we can be sure which had better quality, however different test conditions might reverse the results. Other times there are groups of experts who disagree, then if we have a panel we could go by majority vote. A third category is where quality determination is more vague and becomes purely subjective and personal. For a while people who used to prefer old analog recordings were ridiculed and were told you could not possibly be hearing nuances you claim. So quality is not an absolute in all cases. BTW some recorders have features which make post-production cleaning easier.


Edited By: elTuco on Aug 28, 2016 13:47
#30
Does this record with the screen off? I forget to increase my timeout and with the built in recorded it stops immediately.
#31
It keeps recording when I switch the screen on/off a few times. Might be launcher specific or other apps issuing system commands like screen lock apps etc. I'm using Nova.
1 Like #32
Brilliant, thank you!
#33
http://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/624/media/images/71914000/jpg/_71914207_71914206.jpg

More than doubled now to £4.29 and expired, shop closed, move along please.
1 Like #34
No longer on sale. £4.29 although the icon still says on sale.
#35
dxx
The 'magical cartoonish threshold' of 44.1KHz is not mine, it is from a man named Harry Nyquist. You may be familiar with his work. If you aren't, you should read up on it; it's kind-of an essential if you have any interest in audio engineering.
For info on why that number was chosen look – HERE.

dxx
You should also read up on the ramifications of recording at above 44.1KHz.
Well it does increase the amount of storage required and the overhead for processing more data but what are the other ramifications?
#36
Everyone says different things, a Lavry paper says timing error and "resolution" when downsampling but says 60khz is the magic number, depends who one talks to, numerous different opinions. THX and others are too busy beyond these old wine tasting cliches, feeding higher frequencies into their AI Neural Net architectures and making progress every year. In the film/tv industry, downsampling is the norm and why 88.2 92 96 and 192 are popular. Because when manipulated sp. in time and modified there is more room to play around to get the desired effects and also less residue.
#37
How do I record in stereo to my phone? The jack input is only mono mic...
#38
free at Aptoide.com ;) try before u buy
#39
elTuco
It keeps recording when I switch the screen on/off a few times. Might be launcher specific or other apps issuing system commands like screen lock apps etc. I'm using Nova.
I'm just looking for a easy answer, tbh I'm being lazy, but is this field recorder set up to just plug n record ie I just plug in external Mic and it's ready to record at it's standard quality! For example if I wanted to record a concert , or is there some sort of presets settings that can be chosen? Thanks for any help.
#40
I won't win any technical debate with an audio enthusiast, but I do make YouTube videos a lot and own a Zoom H6 recorder with all mic attachments, a Samson Q2U mic, and a Bluetooth mic. I've also recorded videos using the audio from my smartphone and from my cameras.

There really is no comparison when it comes to audio quality. Even a cheap £30 mic will offer better quality than what's on your phone. You guys are welcome to argue the technical aspects of this, but anyone who has did a lot of recording knows that a smartphone microphone simply can't compare quality to wise with a dedicated microphone or audio recorder.

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