Filippo Berio Extra Virgin Olive Oil £1.87 at ASDA - HotUKDeals
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Filippo Berio Extra Virgin Olive Oil £1.87 at ASDA

£1.87 @ Asda
Also Olive Oil £1.87 too http://groceries.asda.com/asda-webstore/landing/home.shtml?cmpid=ahc-_-ghs-d1-_-asdacom-dsk-_-hp#/product/24484 Size is 500ml - jdbigguy This is a Rollback Deal - r… Read More
Diamond_Studd Avatar
2y, 6m agoFound 2 years, 6 months ago
Also Olive Oil £1.87 too

http://groceries.asda.com/asda-webstore/landing/home.shtml?cmpid=ahc-_-ghs-d1-_-asdacom-dsk-_-hp#/product/24484

Size is 500ml
- jdbigguy

This is a Rollback Deal
- rubberbullets
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2y, 6m agoFound 2 years, 6 months ago
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#1
Good price.. thanks
banned#2
can anyone vouch on quality of this?
#3
un_plug529
can anyone vouch on quality of this?


one of the most high quality olive oils around
#4
un_plug529
can anyone vouch on quality of this?


Or size of bottle?
#5
Does anyone know if Tesco's picked up the price promise for this yet?
4 Likes #6
Just_helping_you_out
un_plug529
can anyone vouch on quality of this?
one of the most high quality olive oils around

you've got to be joking?! This stuff is low quality. It's a mixture of multiple olive varieties, often the cheapest varieties around with not much flavour, heatlth or shelf life properties. It's also probably just on the borders of being extra virgin.

When buying olive oil, always check which varieties are present and then check the properties of each to understand what you're buying. If the varieties aren't stated (which they are not required to), I'd stay away. There are many types of olives and the properties or each vary wildly.

You really do get what you pay for.
2 Likes #7
kknb0800
Just_helping_you_out
un_plug529
can anyone vouch on quality of this?
one of the most high quality olive oils around

you've got to be joking?! This stuff is low quality. It's a mixture of multiple olive varieties, often the cheapest varieties around with not much flavour, heatlth or shelf life properties. It's also probably just on the borders of being extra virgin.

When buying olive oil, always check which varieties are present and then check the properties of each to understand what you're buying. If the varieties aren't stated (which they are not required to), I'd stay away. There are many types of olives and the properties or each vary wildly.

You really do get what you pay for.

you've got to be really, really up your own to start checking for the varieties of olives used in olive oil when buying the stuff... just go to waitrose and buy their bottles at 2.50ish a litre... yes, you get what you pay for but you're going to need to be a bored banker's housewife with a farmhouse in tuscany to worry THAT much about what your friends see you decanting onto the dinner table to drizzle on your focaccia.
1 Like #8
marineville
kknb0800
Just_helping_you_out
un_plug529
can anyone vouch on quality of this?
one of the most high quality olive oils around
you've got to be joking?! This stuff is low quality. It's a mixture of multiple olive varieties, often the cheapest varieties around with not much flavour, heatlth or shelf life properties. It's also probably just on the borders of being extra virgin. When buying olive oil, always check which varieties are present and then check the properties of each to understand what you're buying. If the varieties aren't stated (which they are not required to), I'd stay away. There are many types of olives and the properties or each vary wildly. You really do get what you pay for.
you've got to be really, really up your own to start checking for the varieties of olives used in olive oil when buying the stuff... just go to waitrose and buy their bottles at 2.50ish a litre... yes, you get what you pay for but you're going to need to be a bored banker's housewife with a farmhouse in tuscany to worry THAT much about what your friends see you decanting onto the dinner table to drizzle on your focaccia.

I'd hate to think what exactly you're getting for £2.50/l when this is less than actual trade price for anything half decent but each to their own. I was merely responding to a question about the quality of this stuff.
#9
This and Napolina are what Italians use. If it is good enough for them etc.
#10
Dyslexic_Dog
un_plug529
can anyone vouch on quality of this?
Or size of bottle?
Its a small 500ml bottle
If it was a litre it would be a good deal!
#11
Is it first pressing? Or do you want to wait til everyone else has had their fun with the olives?
#12
come on lets face it, most people who buy this buy it because of the fancy labelling ;)
#13
Comment
kknb0800
Just_helping_you_out
un_plug529
can anyone vouch on quality of this?
one of the most high quality olive oils around

you've got to be joking?! This stuff is low quality. It's a mixture of multiple olive varieties, often the cheapest varieties around with not much flavour, heatlth or shelf life properties. It's also probably just on the borders of being extra virgin.

When buying olive oil, always check which varieties are present and then check the properties of each to understand what you're buying. If the varieties aren't stated (which they are not required to), I'd stay away. There are many types of olives and the properties or each vary wildly.

You really do get what you pay for.


What do you recommend?
#14
marineville
... just go to waitrose and buy their bottles at 2.50ish a litre....

Huuuuh????
This stuff is £1.87 for just 500ml, what's £2.50 litre in Waitrose, sounds a good deal.
1 Like #15
1Sam1
Comment
kknb0800
Just_helping_you_out
un_plug529
can anyone vouch on quality of this?
one of the most high quality olive oils around
you've got to be joking?! This stuff is low quality. It's a mixture of multiple olive varieties, often the cheapest varieties around with not much flavour, heatlth or shelf life properties. It's also probably just on the borders of being extra virgin. When buying olive oil, always check which varieties are present and then check the properties of each to understand what you're buying. If the varieties aren't stated (which they are not required to), I'd stay away. There are many types of olives and the properties or each vary wildly. You really do get what you pay for.
What do you recommend?

As a rule, I'd recommend to begin with estate grown and produced olive oil as quality would be a factor for them. Companies like Filippo Berio purchase oil from producers with an interest to produce as much as possible. This might mean that the olives are left to ripen more than they should or that the oil is extracted at higher temperatures etc. all meaning that the quality of the oil is reduced. Also, they have more of an incentive to use heavy fertilizers which ultimately make it into the oil.

The second factor is the polyphenol content. This is the good stuff in oil which include all the antioxidants and generally all the things which provide you with the touted olive oil health benefits. The greater the polyphenol content, the more health benefits you'll get. Also, it is an indication of the life expectancy. Olive varieties with especially high phenol content are Cornicabra, Moraiolo, Coratina ( I think ) and if I'm not mistaken, the highest of them all is the Koroneiki variety from Greece which, once bottled, has a shelf life of 5 years where most others have 2 or 3 years life.

Then it's just a matter of taste so just try and see what you like best.
#16
At times I love what you can learn on this site. Thanks for the great info on olive oil. Will certainly look at what I am buying more
#17
kknb0800
Just_helping_you_out
un_plug529
can anyone vouch on quality of this?
one of the most high quality olive oils around
you've got to be joking?! This stuff is low quality. It's a mixture of multiple olive varieties, often the cheapest varieties around with not much flavour, heatlth or shelf life properties. It's also probably just on the borders of being extra virgin.
When buying olive oil, always check which varieties are present and then check the properties of each to understand what you're buying. If the varieties aren't stated (which they are not required to), I'd stay away. There are many types of olives and the properties or each vary wildly.
You really do get what you pay for.

not sure what a good quality oil suppose to be for you, not even sure myself. Anyway we have compared this many times against what we call home made Sardinian oil coming from Sardinian olive grove, our real relatives property. We cannot feel any difference at all and we always get it wrong of which one is better. The only difference is that you can find the other one in the market at price up to £15 euro or more in Italy and by the liter.
#18
Excellent find.
1 Like #19
marineville
kknb0800
Just_helping_you_out
un_plug529
can anyone vouch on quality of this?
one of the most high quality olive oils around

you've got to be joking?! This stuff is low quality. It's a mixture of multiple olive varieties, often the cheapest varieties around with not much flavour, heatlth or shelf life properties. It's also probably just on the borders of being extra virgin.

When buying olive oil, always check which varieties are present and then check the properties of each to understand what you're buying. If the varieties aren't stated (which they are not required to), I'd stay away. There are many types of
olives and the properties or each vary wildly.

You really do get what you pay for.
you've got to be really, really up your own to start checking for the varieties of olives used in olive oil when buying the stuff... just go to waitrose and buy their bottles at 2.50ish a litre... yes, you get what you pay for but you're going to need to be a bored banker's housewife with a farmhouse in tuscany to worry THAT much about what your friends see you decanting onto the dinner table to drizzle on your focaccia.
marineville
kknb0800
Just_helping_you_out
un_plug529
can anyone vouch on quality of this?
one of the most high quality olive oils around

you've got to be joking?! This stuff is low quality. It's a mixture of multiple olive varieties, often the cheapest varieties around with not much flavour, heatlth or shelf life properties. It's also probably just on the borders of being extra virgin.

When buying olive oil, always check which varieties are present and then check the properties of each to understand what you're buying. If the varieties aren't stated (which they are not required to), I'd stay away. There are many types of olives and the properties or each vary wildly.

You really do get what you pay for.

you've got to be really, really up your own to start checking for the varieties of olives used in olive oil when buying the stuff... just go to waitrose and buy their bottles at 2.50ish a litre... yes, you get what you pay for but you're going to need to be a bored banker's housewife with a farmhouse in tuscany to worry THAT much about what your friends see you decanting onto the dinner table to drizzle on your focaccia.

It may, for some, be about the actual taste rather than what people think of them. If taste isnt important to you you may well be suited to a cheap homogenised oil with no flavour or depth....especially if used for cooking. Others, though, may enjoy the taste of a better quality oil and be prepared to pay more for it. Neither person is right or wrong its down to choice. You may be ok with drinking a bottle of OLD WESTMINSTER with your meal for example but some may be prepared to spend a little more on something more "complimentary". If you cant tell the difference stick with cheap tat and dont hate the people who can
1 Like #20
El Siccse
This and Napolina are what Italians use. If it is good enough for them etc.
The "Filippo Berio" brand is not sold in Italy. The company is indeed an Italian one, from somewhere near Massa or Lucca, but they market under different brands in Italy, and chances are the oils are different.
Napolina, on the other hand, is a Princes brand. Nothing Italian there. To my understanding their tinned tomatoes may indeed be grown around Foggia, but the brand is utterly unknown in Italy.
Italy had an appalling olive production season, and I would not be surprised if Italian oil will skyrocket in price. Nothing prevents, however, North African or American EVO from being very good, and if my price forecast is correct, we might see more of it.
1 Like #21
ewanyengi
marineville
kknb0800
Just_helping_you_out
un_plug529
can anyone vouch on quality of this?
one of the most high quality olive oils around

you've got to be joking?! This stuff is low quality. It's a mixture of multiple olive varieties, often the cheapest varieties around with not much flavour, heatlth or shelf life properties. It's also probably just on the borders of being extra virgin.

When buying olive oil, always check which varieties are present and then check the properties of each to understand what you're buying. If the varieties aren't stated (which they are not required to), I'd stay away. There are many types of
olives and the properties or each vary wildly.

You really do get what you pay for.
you've got to be really, really up your own to start checking for the varieties of olives used in olive oil when buying the stuff... just go to waitrose and buy their bottles at 2.50ish a litre... yes, you get what you pay for but you're going to need to be a bored banker's housewife with a farmhouse in tuscany to worry THAT much about what your friends see you decanting onto the dinner table to drizzle on your focaccia.
marineville
kknb0800
Just_helping_you_out
un_plug529
can anyone vouch on quality of this?
one of the most high quality olive oils around

you've got to be joking?! This stuff is low quality. It's a mixture of multiple olive varieties, often the cheapest varieties around with not much flavour, heatlth or shelf life properties. It's also probably just on the borders of being extra virgin.

When buying olive oil, always check which varieties are present and then check the properties of each to understand what you're buying. If the varieties aren't stated (which they are not required to), I'd stay away. There are many types of olives and the properties or each vary wildly.

You really do get what you pay for.

you've got to be really, really up your own to start checking for the varieties of olives used in olive oil when buying the stuff... just go to waitrose and buy their bottles at 2.50ish a litre... yes, you get what you pay for but you're going to need to be a bored banker's housewife with a farmhouse in tuscany to worry THAT much about what your friends see you decanting onto the dinner table to drizzle on your focaccia.

It may, for some, be about the actual taste rather than what people think of them. If taste isnt important to you you may well be suited to a cheap homogenised oil with no flavour or depth....especially if used for cooking. Others, though, may enjoy the taste of a better quality oil and be prepared to pay more for it. Neither person is right or wrong its down to choice. You may be ok with drinking a bottle of OLD WESTMINSTER with your meal for example but some may be prepared to spend a little more on something more "complimentary". If you cant tell the difference stick with cheap tat and dont hate the people who can

now, this, see, is the classic passive aggresive put down... seemingly saying it's about choice but deciding that i go for the stuff that tastes like recycled sunflower oil siphoned out of an old diesel engine.

london is full of types that go to oil refineries (or whatever you call a wine shop for olive oil) and start sucking it through their gobs and aeating it through their cheks and telling me that it's an estate vintage that has the nose of a truffle and a saturation point of francesco totti's jockstrap... "it comes from just down the road from where we have a villa... we get an excellent deal on thesegereboa (is that the plural?)..."

when it gets to that stage then i think i'd rather try out crisp'n'dry.

but, more power to your snooty hooter... and please feel free to deride me for my cheapness in reply to my own sarky attack...

Edited By: marineville on Jan 13, 2015 17:11
#22
marineville
ewanyengi
marineville
kknb0800
Just_helping_you_out
un_plug529
can anyone vouch on quality of this?
one of the most high quality olive oils around

you've got to be joking?! This stuff is low quality. It's a mixture of multiple olive varieties, often the cheapest varieties around with not much flavour, heatlth or shelf life properties. It's also probably just on the borders of being extra virgin.

When buying olive oil, always check which varieties are present and then check the properties of each to understand what you're buying. If the varieties aren't stated (which they are not required to), I'd stay away. There are many types of
olives and the properties or each vary wildly.

You really do get what you pay for.
you've got to be really, really up your own to start checking for the varieties of olives used in olive oil when buying the stuff... just go to waitrose and buy their bottles at 2.50ish a litre... yes, you get what you pay for but you're going to need to be a bored banker's housewife with a farmhouse in tuscany to worry THAT much about what your friends see you decanting onto the dinner table to drizzle on your focaccia.
marineville
kknb0800
Just_helping_you_out
un_plug529
can anyone vouch on quality of this?
one of the most high quality olive oils around

you've got to be joking?! This stuff is low quality. It's a mixture of multiple olive varieties, often the cheapest varieties around with not much flavour, heatlth or shelf life properties. It's also probably just on the borders of being extra virgin.

When buying olive oil, always check which varieties are present and then check the properties of each to understand what you're buying. If the varieties aren't stated (which they are not required to), I'd stay away. There are many types of olives and the properties or each vary wildly.

You really do get what you pay for.

you've got to be really, really up your own to start checking for the varieties of olives used in olive oil when buying the stuff... just go to waitrose and buy their bottles at 2.50ish a litre... yes, you get what you pay for but you're going to need to be a bored banker's housewife with a farmhouse in tuscany to worry THAT much about what your friends see you decanting onto the dinner table to drizzle on your focaccia.

It may, for some, be about the actual taste rather than what people think of them. If taste isnt important to you you may well be suited to a cheap homogenised oil with no flavour or depth....especially if used for cooking. Others, though, may enjoy the taste of a better quality oil and be prepared to pay more for it. Neither person is right or wrong its down to choice. You may be ok with drinking a bottle of OLD WESTMINSTER with your meal for example but some may be prepared to spend a little more on something more "complimentary". If you cant tell the difference stick with cheap tat and dont hate the people who can

now, this, see, is the classic passive aggresive put down... seemingly saying it's about choice but deciding that i go for the stuff that tastes like recycled sunflower oil sucked out of an old diesel engine.

london is full of types that go to oil refineries (or whatever you call a wine shop for olive oil) and start sluicing it through their cheks and teeling me that it's an estate vintage that has the nose of a truffle and a saturation point of francesco totti's jockstrap...

but, more power to your snooty hooter... and please feel free to deride me for my cheapness in reply to my own sarky attack...

I agree entirely. Its about individual choice. You are completely correct. Though self acceptance may creep into this somewhere :)
#23
nice just picked myself a bottle up!
#24
it's fine for cooking with, buy a better oil for dressings though.
#25
good price, but virgin, not the extra virgin stuff is better for cooking
#26
lnz
El Siccse
This and Napolina are what Italians use. If it is good enough for them etc.
The "Filippo Berio" brand is not sold in Italy. The company is indeed an Italian one, from somewhere near Massa or Lucca, but they market under different brands in Italy, and chances are the oils are different.
Napolina, on the other hand, is a Princes brand. Nothing Italian there. To my understanding their tinned tomatoes may indeed be grown around Foggia, but the brand is utterly unknown in Italy.
Italy had an appalling olive production season, and I would not be surprised if Italian oil will skyrocket in price. Nothing prevents, however, North African or American EVO from being very good, and if my price forecast is correct, we might see more of it.
Cannot comment on the olive growing season and you seem to have more knowledge of the Olive oil business than myself (which is none). However, you can buy Filippo and napolina in Italy, I have. Though unfortunately it was not a "hot deal".

Edited By: El Siccse on Jan 14, 2015 08:13
#27
as I said, you get what you pay for:

http://www.oliveoiltimes.com/olive-oil-business/north-america/filippo-berio-and-bertolli-class-action/45953

The US has stricter rules than the UK so something like this would be more difficult to pick up over here. When something is being sold less than the actual market trade price, it's often an indicator that you're not quite getting what you think you're paying for.
#28
Richard Branson has fingers in many pies these days. When did he get into the olive oil business?

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