Flat CAT6 Gigabit Ethernet Cable - 3metres grey or black - 99p + delivery @ Partmaster - HotUKDeals
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## Use the promotion code 'wbw10' in the basket to get a further 10% off ##

I grabbed this over a month ago thanks to user "northernlights". Partmaster have stock of both the grey and black versions at 3 metres in length each.

Delivery charge depends on how much your order comes to:

Order value up to £5 = £2.98 delivery charge
£5 to £7.50 = £3.98
£7.50 to £40 = £4.98
£40 and over = £5.98

For example, you buy 5 cables = £4.95 then delivery will be £2.98 making it a total of £7.93 before 10% discount is deducted.
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7y, 10m agoFound 7 years, 10 months ago
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#1
Whats the difference between CAT5E and CAT6? And is this a patch cable or a crossover cable? Thanks.
banned#2
cicobuff
Whats the difference between CAT5E and CAT6? And is this a patch cable or a crossover cable? Thanks.


good question any ideas? http://www.picturehoster.org/storage/36.jpg
2 Likes #3
Cat-5-Cable-Company

[Q] What is the difference between CAT 6 and CAT 5e cable?

[A] Currently there is a great deal of confusion among Ethernet cable buyers concerning whether to purchase Cat5e, or to use Cat6. Most of this confusion comes from a misunderstanding by the buyer that buying Cat6 cable will give them an "all gigabit" network. This is not the case. Unless every single component in the network is gigabit rated, then you will never have a gigabit network, because your network will always run at the speed of your slowest device. Cat5e cable of good quality can run near or at gigabit speeds, it just cannot be "certified" for this use. By comparison, Cat6 is designed especially for gigabit use, and is certified to operate at said speed. It becomes a matter of whether or not you want to pay all that extra money, for little or no noticeable improvement in the performance of you network. In most cases, it makes more sense to go with Cat5e. It is for this reason that most of your new installations in the private sector are going with Cat5e. It is more economical, performs well, and is readily available in many colors. Many IT professionals when asked about why they specified Cat6 for a specific job, often responded stated that they "wanted the best they could get." This is the line of thought behind many purchases of cable. The average consumer often times is not aware that there is no real benefit to them to use Cat6, so they let someone talk them in to buying it. CAT 5 Cable Company is committed to helping people make good decisions about cable purchases and we are always standing by to help you.


Taken from http://www.cat-5-cable-company.com/faq-cat6-v-cat5e.html

More at: http://www.broadbandutopia.com/caandcaco.html and http://cableorganizer.com/articles/cat5-cat5e-cat6.htm

As for patch and crossover: These cables are patch cables. However, most modern devices perform internal crossover if needed. It's unlikely that you'll have a Gigabit enabled device that doesn't do internal crossover. I've used one of my cables to connect to desktop PCs that have gigabit ethernet and I can use the same one to connect another PC directly to my gigabit switch.
2 Likes #4
Cat6E cable is rated 1.0Gbps
Cat5E cable is rated 100mbps (I believe it can push around 120mbps)

My home network utilises Cat6E cable - takes about 4mins to transfer 5GB of data from the server to the PC. Bear in mind it used to take 40mins+ over wireless.....

Geeza
#5
Cuddy
Taken from http://www.cat-5-cable-company.com/faq-cat6-v-cat5e.html

More at: http://www.broadbandutopia.com/caandcaco.html and http://cableorganizer.com/articles/cat5-cat5e-cat6.htm

As for patch and crossover: These cables are patch cables. However, most modern devices perform internal crossover if needed. It's unlikely that you'll have a Gigabit enabled device that doesn't do internal crossover. I've used one of my cables to connect to desktop PCs that have gigabit ethernet and I can use the same one to connect another PC directly to my gigabit switch.


Baldhopper
Cat6E cable is rated 1.0Gbps
Cat5E cable is rated 100mbps (I believe it can push around 120mbps)

My home network utilises Cat6E cable - takes about 4mins to transfer 5GB of data from the server to the PC. Bear in mind it used to take 40mins+ over wireless.....

Geeza


Thanks guys, rep left. Heat added, seems a really good deal on these.
#6
shielded twisted pair or unshielded twisted pair?
#7
Cat 5e can handle data transfer at 1000 Mbps, is suitable for Gigabit Ethernet
Cat 6 cable is ideal for supporting 10 Gigabit Ethernet, and is able to operate at up to 250 MHz.

So unless you have a 10Gigabit Ethernet infrastructure there is no need for cat6..
#8
Baldhopper

My home network utilises Cat6E cable - takes about 4mins to transfer 5GB of data from the server to the PC. Bear in mind it used to take 40mins+ over wireless.....

Geeza


My Home wi-fi network can transfer much faster than that ;) 802.11n and all that ........ You must have a really bad wifi network.

Good price for the cable though heat added.
#9
Alternatively just check out ebuyer.com as they have a vast range of Ethernet RJ45 cables in a vast range of lengths and specs and colours. I ordered 6 x regular/round Cat 6 black 0.5m 2.0m and power cables from them and they arrived 2 days later by first class post just last week at same ball park prices as this deal. Not personally sure why one would want flat Ethernet cables, but guess there is a demand for them.

As Mikemod has said 5e is rated upto 1GB links and most people find 5 spec can deliver it too. However if Cat 6, ie rated 1GB+, can be obtained for only a marginal increase in price then why not over specify - I certainly do that with patch cables as they are the 'weak link' in any overall cabling chain.

If its cabling that you often connect/disconnect/move around then I would suggest considering not so much what Cat is on the cable but that it is "booted" or "snagless" so that the plastic lug that clicks and holds the RJ45 plug firmly into the socket is protected/booted/covered and so doesn't get broken off as a connector without that lug is a problem just waiting to happen!
#10
Cheaper Here 46p inc VAT and in a variety of colurs
Grey‚ Black‚ Blue‚ Green‚ Red‚ Yellow‚ Purple‚ White & Orange.

http://pcwares.co.uk/store/viewItem.asp?idProduct=379

Found Cat 6e very fast although all components that use this need to have gigabit functions otherwise they will revert to the slower Cat 5 speed
#11
Any one know where I could find a 10m cat 6e cable ?.............Cheapish :)
#12
himmerz
shielded twisted pair or unshielded twisted pair?


Going by the flatness I'm guessing unshielded but the vendor should be able to confirm this. Should be ok for home use though
#13
Nuff Said
Any one know where I could find a 10m cat 6e cable ?.............Cheapish :)


Never heard of 6e. There's old 5 and current 5e and 6, and references to 6a, but 6e ?

You can get 10m of 6 from ebuyer for 3.75 + P&P of 2.58+.
#14
cicobuff
Whats the difference between CAT5E and CAT6? And is this a patch cable or a crossover cable? Thanks.



This will be a patch i.e. standard network cable which is what you need if you're connecting to routers, switches etc :thumbsup:

See the other post for Cat5/6 differences
#15
JABWootton


That's only 0.5m :-(
#16
- It will clearly be UTP - STP is expensive and specialist.
- Cat5e will support Gig ethernet.
- From an end user point of view, no difference realistically between Cat5e and Cat6 - it is only when you use TenGig links that you start to need to worry about it.
- Wifi will never transfer anywhere near the speeds that copper does currently, even on 100MB. On a 100MB Wifi connection (if you are lucky enough to have n and excellent signal), you still lose 50% of your throughput to protocol overhead, and then an extra percentage to collisions due to the shared access medium of wireless (similar to legacy hubs). On n you will get GOODput of around 40MB, compared to around 90-95MB (after Ethernet overheads) on a 100MB wired network.
#17
Cuddy
Taken from http://www.cat-5-cable-company.com/faq-cat6-v-cat5e.html

More at: http://www.broadbandutopia.com/caandcaco.html and http://cableorganizer.com/articles/cat5-cat5e-cat6.htm

As for patch and crossover: These cables are patch cables. However, most modern devices perform internal crossover if needed. It's unlikely that you'll have a Gigabit enabled device that doesn't do internal crossover. I've used one of my cables to connect to desktop PCs that have gigabit ethernet and I can use the same one to connect another PC directly to my gigabit switch.


I get 26 meg a second to 30 meg a second (more like 28 meg avg* though) on 5e cable using 2x 8 port gs108 attached to 10/100 router (slowest device) altjhough it depends on how you have the gear hooked up (eg although my dsl modem/router is 4 port 10/100 and the slowest device) I still get 1000,1000 tx rate over gs108 to gs108 and all 10/100/1000 cards in all pc's
#18
good deal voted hot

JABWootton
Cheaper Here 46p inc VAT and in a variety of colurs
Grey‚ Black‚ Blue‚ Green‚ Red‚ Yellow‚ Purple‚ White & Orange.

http://pcwares.co.uk/store/viewItem.asp?idProduct=379


Minimum order value is £50.00 ex VAT (Delivery costs not included.)
#19
Bargain, Hot!!
#20
mk-donald
Never heard of 6e. There's old 5 and current 5e and 6, and references to 6a, but 6e ?

You can get 10m of 6 from ebuyer for 3.75 + P&P of 2.58+.


Cheers for that ..probably me misreading .
I have a gigabit router and 2 gigabit mobos so should really see how fast I can get them talking to each other .
#21
Including postage it's 4p cheaper at Ebuyer so why so hot? http://www.ebuyer.com/product/130680
If you're buying a hand full you'll save with this deal but you're still only talking pence. :?

I forgot the 10% code so thid is 6p cheaper than eBuyer. Crack open the vintage champagne. :)
#22
I've a quick question for you tech people.

Will I see any speed advantages using a cat6 over a cat5e with my xbox, I have a 8meg be-broadband connection?

I need all the advantage i can get on COD4, my reactions are slow and old.:-(
#23
danny-mac
I've a quick question for you tech people.

Will I see any speed advantages using a cat6 over a cat5e with my xbox, I have a 8meg be-broadband connection?


No.
banned#24
I find that generally with Cat6 cabling you get a plastic spine running through the cable, this is great for long runs that don't get moved around (trunk cabling for example) but for short patch cables the spineless Cat5e cables make more sense. This is especially true if you're running cables from a patch panel to a switch for example, the amount of cracked ends I''d seen and had to replace because of the spine on Cat6 cables was enough for me to only use Cat5e cables for that purpose again.
#25
Cheers for this, can never have too many lan cables hanging around!
#26
xenept
Cheers for this, can never have too many lan cables hanging around!


Try telling my wife that!

Unless every single component in the network is gigabit rated, then you will never have a gigabit network, because your network will always run at the speed of your slowest device


Thanks for posting this offer and the discussion going on later. One point that was made in an earlier post is that you won't get a gigabit unless all the equipment on your network is rated for it. I'm sure that isn't true.
I have a computer in one room with a gigabit ethernet card connected to a netgear gigabit switch. Plugged in here are other slow devices like a printer running at 100M. I have a Cat 5e cable running to the other side of my house where I have an identical netgear gigabit switch. Connected there is a Linux computer I use as a server and runs XBMC, it has a gigabit ethernet card. Also connected there is my adsl modem which is only at 100M.

Now according to what was written earlier the two 100M devices connected will bring down the whole speed of the network. But I'm sure the whole point of using switches is that this kind of thing doesn't happen. Anybody shed any light on that?
banned#27
TC!
Try telling my wife that!



Thanks for posting this offer and the discussion going on later. One point that was made in an earlier post is that you won't get a gigabit unless all the equipment on your network is rated for it. I'm sure that isn't true.
I have a computer in one room with a gigabit ethernet card connected to a netgear gigabit switch. Plugged in here are other slow devices like a printer running at 100M. I have a Cat 5e cable running to the other side of my house where I have an identical netgear gigabit switch. Connected there is a Linux computer I use as a server and runs XBMC, it has a gigabit ethernet card. Also connected there is my adsl modem which is only at 100M.

Now according to what was written earlier the two 100M devices connected will bring down the whole speed of the network. But I'm sure the whole point of using switches is that this kind of thing doesn't happen. Anybody shed any light on that?


I think it refers to any point in a series of links eg if you have one computer with a Gig NIC connected to a Gig switch connected to another computer with a Gig NIC then you have a full gigabit link. If however any of those devices in that chain had a 100Mb NIC/switch then the whole link downgrades to it's weakest link making it 100Mb.
#28
mk-donald
Not personally sure why one would want flat Ethernet cables, but guess there is a demand for them...

To run under carpets and flooring :thumbsup:

Cat-5-Cable-Company
Unless every single component in the network is gigabit rated, then you will never have a gigabit network, because your network will always run at the speed of your slowest device.

Not true.
You can quite happily plug in 100Mb and 1Gb devices into your 1Gb switch, and they'll happily coexist at different speeds. You'll see 1Gb between your 1Gb-capable devices, and 100Mb to all your 100Mb devices.
You certainly do not need an "all Gigabit network" to see Gigabit speeds !

Cat-5-Cable-Company
It becomes a matter of whether or not you want to pay all that extra money, for little or no noticeable improvement in the performance of you network. In most cases, it makes more sense to go with Cat5e. It is for this reason that most of your new installations in the private sector are going with Cat5e.

Not true.

The cost difference between Cat5e and Cat6 is almost nothing. It makes no sense whatsoever to run Cat5e around, when you can future-proof yourself with Cat6 ! Cable is easily replaced when it's just laying around ... but you sure as hell don't want to be digging out your walls some years from now, when 10Gb gear becomes commonplace :)
It's for this reason that just about all new installations today, use Cat6 cable.

Just for reference, the last large install I was involved with, cost around £230,000 in total. The vast majority of this cost was labour - it's the cable-pulling work that costs the money. If we'd chosen Cat5e cable, we might have saved a few grand ... a tiny percentage of the total cost !
#29
Agreed Nom - IME, most new private sector cabling currently is Cat6, certainly on any scale above SME. The cost difference is negligable. Also, in any kind of enterprise environment, you will find that there are a lot of TenGig links....
#30
TC!
Try telling my wife that!
Now according to what was written earlier the two 100M devices connected will bring down the whole speed of the network. But I'm sure the whole point of using switches is that this kind of thing doesn't happen. Anybody shed any light on that?



If you use a HUB then everything will run at the speed of the slowest device irrospective of whether you are moving data to that device. If you use a switch or a router the speed is determined by the slowest link in the data path.

Example

I have a hub, 2 x 1Gb Pc's and 1 x 100Mb pc. No matter where the data is being routed the network will only operate at 100Mb.

I have a router/switch, 2 x 1Gb Pc's and 1 x 100Mb pc. Traffic between the 2 1Gb pc's will transfer at up to 1Gb (in reality around 300Mb depending on the config of the pc). Traffic between teh 1Gb pc and the 100Mb pc will transfer at up to 100Mb (in reality around 70Mb depending on the config of the pc)
#31
I would really really hope that no-one, certainly home users, would still have genuine hubs these days!
#32
MrShed
I would really really hope that no-one, certainly home users, would still have genuine hubs these days!


I would be very surprised is someone had a hub but you never know!
#33
True!

I remember when we went to upgrade a network last year - and found them using about 20 hubs throughout the building. I nearly cried!
#34
Baldhopper
Cat6E cable is rated 1.0Gbps
Cat5E cable is rated 100mbps (I believe it can push around 120mbps)

My home network utilises Cat6E cable - takes about 4mins to transfer 5GB of data from the server to the PC. Bear in mind it used to take 40mins+ over wireless.....

Geeza


Im using cat 5 and it takes me about 4minutes also to transfer 5GB of data dont see the point in upgrading
#35
These are still available if anyone is interested, 10% discount code of 'wbw10' still works too :thumbsup:
#36
he he he, offer is still going and the code works!!
#37
gone up in price, expiring.
#38
lol: Well it has been a year and 4 months

Edited By: dontasciime on Aug 13, 2010 23:48: s

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