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FON Router now only £24.99 @ Fon Shop INC Del.

haritori Avatar
6y, 11m agoFound 6 years, 11 months ago
FON is the worlds largest WiFi community and the best way to get connected to the internet for free!
When you buy any Fonera (FONs line of revolutionary WiFi routers) and connect it to your existing broadband connection, you create a FON Spot (a secure WiFi access point) that allows you to share your WiFi connection with other FON members.
The Fonera 2.0 series allows you to do even more with your WiFi. You can upload videos to YouTube, and photos to Facebook, Picasa or Flickr and download torrents or files, directly to or from an external hard disk...even when your computer is off!

La Fonera+ is the 2-port edition of FON's cool WiFi router. It comes with an Internet port to connect to your existing broadband service, and an additional LAN port to connect a wired device to your network. La Fonera+ is easy to install, offers data transfer rates of up to 54Mbps, and works with all of your WiFi-ready devices (laptops, phones, MP3 players, etc.). You will become part of the BT FON community with free access to more than 500,000 hotspots in the UK and 700,000 hotspots in the world, and additionally you will receive 120 minutes of free access to BT Openzone's 3,000 premium hotspots.


This is a fantastic money saving and possibly earning device for anyone who uses BT OpenZone and Fon Hotspots in the UK, and the great thign is they are everywhere!!

please let me know if you vote cold why?
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haritori Avatar
6y, 11m agoFound 6 years, 11 months ago
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#1
Share my BB connection so others can illegally fileshare, or worse? No thanks. You do realise if they do this, you as the account holder would be held legally responsible, yes?

Cold from me I'm afraid, no matter how cheap it is.
#2
I got one of these and modded it so I could steal my neigbours wifi. Good piece of kit.
#3
deathtrap3000
I got one of these and modded it so I could steal my neigbours wifi. Good piece of kit.


thats cool how do you do that?
#4
ricaird
Share my BB connection so others can illegally fileshare, or worse? No thanks. You do realise if they do this, you as the account holder would be held legally responsible, yes?

Cold from me I'm afraid, no matter how cheap it is.


After dealing with a lovely set of lawyers for two years after someone doing exactly this, I wish I could vote it colder.
#5
Its a good price for this feature alone no? "download torrents or files, directly to or from an external hard disk...even when your computer is off!"

Just disable the WiFi?
#6
Dr_Frankenstein
After dealing with a lovely set of lawyers for two years after someone doing exactly this, I wish I could vote it colder.


do you refuse to drink beer in protest of drunk drivers too?
#7
how to say...
Im going to church even if some priest are pedofile....

so...
la foneros is really good idea, but how people use it is different story...

for me hot
#8
Have I read the information wrong but you have to be within 15-30m of the device for it to work.
#9
ascen
do you refuse to drink beer in protest of drunk drivers too?


dont understand your point here. could you explain it more.

someone steals your broadband signal and downloads illegally fileshare or kiddy porn and you get the blame!

some one steals your car gets drunk, drives your car gets pulled over and you get the blame?

Nice Metaphor:thumbsup:
#10
freezspirit
Have I read the information wrong but you have to be within 15-30m of the device for it to work.


Yes is the long and short of it, works exactly the same as a normal Wifi but is pre set up so there is a public wifi section so you can share with anyone but also there is a private wifi aspect for your normal fully secured browsing needs.

To be honest FON needs to drop the price by another £15 before I would even vaguely consider the idea. Good concept, but awful price compared to buying a better alternative router. All you get out of it is free wifi access to other FON users who are few and far between and to be honest there are loads of other free hot spots you can use (mcdonalds etc).
#11
please let me know if you vote cold why?


Can't see any advantage to me, the purchaser, in buying and operating this. The legal issue is another thing altogether..

I'm sure ISP's just love this :-D
#12
I got one of these without a psu from a car boot sale for 50p. If you know what you are doing (JTAG flashing), you can program dd-wrt on there and turn this into an open full featured wifi AP. I wouldn't pay £25 for one and I certainly wouldn't use the Fon as is with public hotspot enabled - way too risky.
#13
neomayemer
Its a good price for this feature alone no? "download torrents or files, directly to or from an external hard disk...even when your computer is off!"

Just disable the WiFi?


Torrent download is only supported on the more expensive version - Fonera 2.0N (£79).
#14
we have BT BB and they turned us into a Fon spot. We were on their map. As we live in a remote place surrounded by fields it was obviously us, and useless unless the sheep are interested. I disabled it. If I saw a guy in a mac with a laptop outside the kitchen window I would have freaked. Plus the connection is frail at the best of times.
not voted.
1 Like #15
there is zero chance of being prosecuted for download of illegal content through this method, the analogies are very vague but a bit like leaving your shed open and being prosecuted cos someone uses your shovel illegally.
the real benefit of these is by sharing your connection you also gain access to other wifi networks when you are out and about.
some will find a use some will not but seriously, these cold votes because of "imagined and bizarre" reasons are getting out of hand.
#16
I signed up for it through BT BB anywhere thinking I'd be able to use a FON hotspot while out and about or on holiday. I printed out all the likely locations I could use and never found one.

Some ISPs won't allow it so you'd need to check first.

A complete waste of time in my opinion.
#17
maddogb
there is zero chance of being prosecuted for download of illegal content through this method...

...some will find a use some will not but seriously, these cold votes because of "imagined and bizarre" reasons are getting out of hand.


You go ahead and bury your head in the sand, and the rest of us can take proper precautions - including staying away from these 'open access' routers. Part of my job is responsible for wireless security and educating the public about the risks of unsecured and open access, and this is a real risk and is neither 'imagined' or 'bizarre' as you suggest.

Even a quick google search would prove that:

Pub fined £8000 for customer's illicit downloads - November 09, Guardian
Millions at risk from wifi online fraudsters - December 09, Times

And in terms of future legislation, you're likely to have your Internet connection removed too:
Net pirates to be disconnected - November 09, BBC

I know of people first-hand who have been fined for illegal downloads, which they categorically did not download themselves, but left themselves open through unsecured wifi. It would appear that even someone on this very thread has suffered a similar problem.

For these legitimate (not imaginary or bizarre) reasons, it's still a cold deal. In fact they could be giving these away for free, and it'd STILL be a cold deal.
#18
ricaird
You go ahead and bury your head in the sand, and the rest of us can take proper precautions - including staying away from these 'open access' routers. Part of my job is responsible for wireless security and educating the public about the risks of unsecured and open access, and this is a real risk and is neither 'imagined' or 'bizarre' as you suggest.

Even a quick google search would prove that:

Pub fined £8000 for customer's illicit downloads - November 09, Guardian
Millions at risk from wifi online fraudsters - December 09, Times

And in terms of future legislation, you're likely to have your Internet connection removed too:
Net pirates to be disconnected - November 09, BBC

I know of people first-hand who have been fined for illegal downloads, which they categorically did not download themselves, but left themselves open through unsecured wifi. It would appear that even someone on this very thread has suffered a similar problem.

For these legitimate (not imaginary or bizarre) reasons, it's still a cold deal. In fact they could be giving these away for free, and it'd STILL be a cold deal.



as this is part of your profession you should be doubly ashamed at spreading unfounded nonsense. those links you posted are not relevent at all
the fon network is not "open" to all and carries network identification methods to track usage whatever/wherever the connection, how the hell do you think bt operate openzone?
#19
ricaird
You go ahead and bury your head in the sand, and the rest of us can take proper precautions - including staying away from these 'open access' routers. Part of my job is responsible for wireless security and educating the public about the risks of unsecured and open access, and this is a real risk and is neither 'imagined' or 'bizarre' as you suggest.
.


So You get paid for Bu11$h1tting. Hmmmm.
La fonera is a Very good idea. I had la fonera router three years ago when they were giving away it for free.
It is very good idea to have internet where ever you go..
The whole concept is great.
AND YOU DO LOG IN WITH YOUR LA FONERA PASSWRD AND LOGIN NAME WHILE USEING PUBLIC WIFI
Now you know you are spreading misinformation....:whistling:
#20
bibu
AND YOU DO LOG IN WITH YOUR LA FONERA PASSWRD AND LOGIN NAME WHILE USEING PUBLIC WIFI


Irrelevant - anything downloaded will be tracked against YOUR home IP address unless you are claiming that this device somehow creates a completely segregated ADSL connection to your ISP. The lawyers will come after you and it will be up to you to somehow prove that it was someone else who downloaded/uploaded the data - good luck with that.

- Simon.
1 Like #21
ricaird


For these legitimate (not imaginary or bizarre) reasons, it's still a cold deal. In fact they could be giving these away for free, and it'd STILL be a cold deal.


It would only be a cold deal if somewhere else were paying you to take one. You seem to be confused, this is hotukdeals where people post the cheapest place to buy a particular product.

If you want to prove this is a COLD deal find somewhere offering this product cheaper.

Apart from that you are correct these are a terrible idea, I would never buy one or take one for free. However I don't know of anyone selling it cheaper so I will not vote it cold.
#22
brookheather
Irrelevant - anything downloaded will be tracked against YOUR home IP address unless you are claiming that this device somehow creates a completely segregated ADSL connection to your ISP. The lawyers will come after you and it will be up to you to somehow prove that it was someone else who downloaded/uploaded the data - good luck with that.

- Simon.


if you had done any reading on how this works you would know it's not irrelevant at all,
for gods sake what is with the nonsense being posted this morn? i mean really the zdnet link from the other poster was the worst piece of reporting i have ever read, purely gossip and no facts
#23
I remember a few years back, they had a promotion where they were giving away the older version for free. I managed to bag two of them. Loaded up a modified version of DD-WRT and have been using them as wireless bridges instead :thumbsup:
#24
I don't know about the standalone FON device, but the BT Homehub has FON built in and its perfectly safe to share your connection.
From BT's FON site:

BT FON
What happens if someone uses my broadband connection to access an illegal site? Can I prove that it wasn't me accessing the sites?
Yes, the visitor’s access to the Internet will be through a separate channel and so we can tell the difference between the home user’s Internet activity and visitor Internet activity.
1 Like #25
Jees, i posted this as to show the cheapest i could find it for, reason being i have BT Broadband and Home Hub 2.0 with Fon Built In!! which i have been sharing ince i got it! i can then use Fon and Openzone for free on my iPod Touch for free!!

All these cold votes are becuase you dont like the product or idea, my rep will go down becuase you cant vote simply on the price as it ismeant to work! bunch of idiots this morning, no one is forcing you to buy this and share your connection, i simply posted the deal as i received an email showig the cheapest price possible, and all those advsiing it will be you responsible well your wrong it tracks seperate and the FON Network keeps IP of those accessing the public side of the network, you are safe to use these FFS!
#26
MrHonky
I got one of these without a psu from a car boot sale for 50p. If you know what you are doing (JTAG flashing), you can program dd-wrt on there and turn this into an open full featured wifi AP. I wouldn't pay £25 for one and I certainly wouldn't use the Fon as is with public hotspot enabled - way too risky.


ive picked up several when they have been on sale for £5 + shipping
#27
pooka
dont understand your point here. could you explain it more.

someone steals your broadband signal and downloads illegally fileshare or kiddy porn and you get the blame!

some one steals your car gets drunk, drives your car gets pulled over and you get the blame?

Nice Metaphor:thumbsup:



the poster said essentially: "from of a negative experience, i object" - paraphrasing "from years of trouble with lawyers i wish i could vote this deal colder"

i was likening it to a universally acknowledged potential negative experience - drunk driving, and asking him if he also protests that by not drinking, which i highly doubted

the point was concerning: does potential negative experiences justify protesting/objecting?

it makes me wonder if votes are on moral grounds or the value of a deal

please forgive me, english is a second language
#28
brookheather
Irrelevant - anything downloaded will be tracked against YOUR home IP address unless you are claiming that this device somehow creates a completely segregated ADSL connection to your ISP. The lawyers will come after you and it will be up to you to somehow prove that it was someone else who downloaded/uploaded the data - good luck with that.

- Simon.


technically you don't need a segregated adsl connection, here are three ways at least that bt could be using:

having the foneros traffic on a seperate vlan which acl'd off from the standard users home network and either:
1) using vpn to tunnel it to bt
2) bonding that traffic with a secondary ip associated with the adsl router
3) using 802.1q to trunk vlans to bt
#29
So I can just create a dummy FON account (which doesn't seem to need any form of authentication) and then download anything from my own broadband using that FON account and then claim it wasn't me that was downloading content but some mythical person who had connected to my connection?
#30
brookheather
So I can just create a dummy FON account (which doesn't seem to need any form of authentication) and then download anything from my own broadband using that FON account and then claim it wasn't me that was downloading content but some mythical person who had connected to my connection?


or you could just admit you were wrong and give up arguing no biggie if you're not a professional,
£24.99 and sacrificing a bit of unused home bandwidth is not a bad price to get access to thousands of hotspots
#31
brookheather
So I can just create a dummy FON account (which doesn't seem to need any form of authentication) and then download anything from my own broadband using that FON account and then claim it wasn't me that was downloading content but some mythical person who had connected to my connection?


if you want to.. but to get a useful account the gist is you have to

1) pay for it somehow and thus provide them with some information about you
2) get it free from bt and thus have already provided information indentifying you

remember you presented a technical argument, i provided a technical rebuttal. we were not discussing lying yet..

[INDENT]brookheather:
[SIZE="4"]Irrelevant[/SIZE] - [SIZE="3"]anything[/SIZE] downloaded will be tracked against YOUR home IP address unless you are claiming that this device somehow creates a completely segregated ADSL connection to your ISP. The lawyers will come after you and it will be up to you to somehow prove that it was someone else who downloaded/uploaded the data - good luck with that.
[/INDENT]

and i just said "technically you are wrong" and justified the technical reasons why

remember there is two types of fonero.

the first being the integrated fonero adsl router supplied by bt, the second being the fonero wap (as in this deal)

the integrated fonero: the integrated fonero by bt is interesting, in that could it be argued legallly that this is actually a service provided by BT to the public, rather than the home owner. the branding says bt and fonero, it doesnt say "ascens mighty download-a-tube". so legally, given that bt provides, endorses and publicises, they claim ownership and thus liability. another point is that since bt isolates (from the homeowners network) the fonero traffic, via vpn or whatever, you are essentially only become a conduit. as in, the router becomes nothing more than a pipe, carrying data between a third party and bt. another way to look at this is, if you purchased a can of drink and discovered it was spiked with poison at the filling plant - is it the bottle manufacturors fault for making a bottle that was used illegally by the drink company to poison you? or is it the drink factory that put the poisoned drink in the bottle.

the fonero wap: this one opens up more cans of worms, but you could easily fix that too.
1) bouncing it through a censorship proxy
2) bouncing it through china/iran/north korea/syria and their "great firewall of morals"
3) feed traffic to a tor proxy
4) traffic shape and block certains ports, traffic patterns

there will always be a concern about providing publically accessable wifi, but fonero provided by bt does provide the three A's in security: authentication, authorisation and accountability.. but even then, at most public pay waps, it is easy enough to get free access anyway, typically using ip over dns or ip over icmp..

waps = wireless access points
#32
ricaird

I know of people first-hand who have been fined for illegal downloads, which they categorically did not download themselves, but left themselves open through unsecured wifi. It would appear that even someone on this very thread has suffered a similar problem.


As far as I know, there have been a number of civil cases bought against individuals suspected of sharing. These divided up into several groups:
[LIST=1]
[*]Those claiming to have not shared files and end up settling out of court (why not defend it if not guilty?)
[*]Those claiming to have not shared files and end up in court and the decision is made against them as there has been irrefutable proof found that they have been sharing files.
[*]Those claiming to have not shared files and end up in court and the decision is made in their favour as there is no proof that they have been sharing files.
[/LIST]

I'm presuming these people you know fall into group 1 then?
#33
maddogb
as this is part of your profession you should be doubly ashamed at spreading unfounded nonsense.


bibu
So You get paid for Bu11$h1tting.


Ah yes, I thought comments like these might arise. In response, just two single words for you to Google: fon hacking

As much as the fon may offer a mode of authentication, you are still providing a publicly visible access point with relatively little security. You've left the front door open, from there anyone intent on getting up to no good is perfectly free and able to do so. Every time, my money would go on buying a regular wireless router, where I can fully apply and completely control all aspects of the security - including the highest level encryption my devices can all cope with, mac address filtering, disabled SSID broadcast, limited & reserved DHCP address , and whatever else comes along. If you can prove beyond reasonable doubt that you've taken all available steps, then you might well have a chance against lawyers, otherwise you're pretty much screwed. Given how easy it is to get your hands on a fon account, I really wouldn't be comfortabe relying on the 'promise' from the supplier that the person up to no good will be held accountable. Quite simply, if they can't be traced, YOU as the account holder WILL be held responsible, fined and/or prosecuted accordingly.
#34
ricaird


This case has repeatedly been misleadingly reported. What it says is that a someone said that a pub was fined £8000. It doesn't confirm this and gives no further details about what happened.

Again, this could only have been heard in a civil court. If this had reached the stage of judgement, then in all likelihood it would have been reported somewhere or ended up in BAILLII, due to the ground-breaking nature of the case. It didn't however, so it sounds like the pub owner settled before final judgement.

Speculation is that this was done either because the owner was involved or had knowledge that persistent illegal downloading was occurring using his wi-fi network.
#35
cybergibbons


I'm presuming these people you know fall into group 1 then?


Correct. I've only read of people falling into group 2.
#36
cybergibbons

Speculation is that this was done either because the owner was involved or had knowledge that persistent illegal downloading was occurring using his wi-fi network.


Couldn't it be argued however, that unless you have decent industy standard web-filtering (such as websense) and you allow public access to your Internet connection (in the way that mcdonalds, libraries, or dare I say fon devices do), you are effectively enabling people to illegally download, in full knowledge that you have done so - i.e., you did not take the necessary steps to prevent it.
#37
ricaird
Every time, my money would go on buying a regular wireless router, where I can fully apply and completely control all aspects of the security - including the highest level encryption my devices can all cope with, mac address filtering, disabled SSID broadcast, limited & reserved DHCP address , and whatever else comes along. If you can prove beyond reasonable doubt that you've taken all available steps, then you might well have a chance against lawyers, otherwise you're pretty much screwed.


WEP and WPA can be cracked in under 15 minutes reliably. WPA2 with pre-shared keys is fairly vulnerable, especially with the poor and short passwords people use.

A lot of smaller and older devices don't support WPA2, and many not even WPA. So I need to drop my network security down to get things like digital photo frames, mobile phones, Nintendo DS etc. to connect to the network. I've not taken all available steps then have I?

MAC addresses are trivial to spoof, you can do it in Windows with no extra software.

SSID broadcasting doesn't stop a malicious attacker, neither does restricting DHCP or even using fixed IPs.

The burden of proof is on them, not you.
#38
cybergibbons
WEP and WPA can be cracked in under 15 minutes reliably. WPA2 with pre-shared keys is fairly vulnerable, especially with the poor and short passwords people use.

A lot of smaller and older devices don't support WPA2, and many not even WPA. So I need to drop my network security down to get things like digital photo frames, mobile phones, Nintendo DS etc. to connect to the network. I've not taken all available steps then have I?

MAC addresses are trivial to spoof, you can do it in Windows with no extra software.

SSID broadcasting doesn't stop a malicious attacker, neither does restricting DHCP or even using fixed IPs.

The burden of proof is on them, not you.


All 100% accurate, and perfectly valid points. That said, I'll still always keep my security on maximum. These days, there are so many wifi signals in any given street, they're sure to latch onto the ones with lowest security. At least if there is a problem further down the line, I have some proof of the steps I took to prevent it.
#39
im just throwing an idea out there for discussion:

i tend to think that the law needs to define clearly who is to fault and to apply it consistently, for example (rhetorical questions to spur discussion):

how is an isp providing an internet dialtone not at fault, whereas isp ascen is?

isn't fonero essentially providing a home with an ability to become and isp?

are isps being held accountable?

some isps don't allow customers to attach these devices, but others are ok with it, perhaps the isps that allow it should also allow themselves to legal liability
1 Like #40
ricard please stop spouting it,
the simple truth is these devices are classed as "telecomms provision" and are not subject to the same legal scrutiny over filesharing as your home network.
given your arguments we wouldn't have any broadband in this country or BT could be prosecuted for allowing illegal filesharing.
your statements about fon hacking are on the same wavelength as someone stealing my car and me being prosecuted because they use it in a bankjob, but hey maybe i shouldn't have parked it on a public street?

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