Ford Fiesta Diesel 1.5 TDCi Zetec Navigation 5dr (£110.75 per month) £3654.70 @ Fleet Prices - HotUKDeals
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Ford Fiesta Diesel 1.5 TDCi Zetec Navigation 5dr (£110.75 per month) £3,654.70 @ Fleet Prices

£3654.70 @ Fleetprices
Ford Fiesta Diesel Hatchback 1.5 TDCi Zetec Navigation 5dr - £110.75 per month (£2658 over two years) - Initial payment: 996.73 - Total: £3654.70 - Personal contract hire - Contract te… Read More
shuwaz Avatar
1m, 1w agoFound 1 month, 1 week ago
Ford Fiesta Diesel Hatchback 1.5 TDCi Zetec Navigation 5dr

- £110.75 per month (£2658 over two years)

- Initial payment: 996.73

- Total: £3654.70

- Personal contract hire

- Contract term: 24 months

- Rental profile: 9 + 23

- Annual mileage: 8000

- Production status: Current model

- CO2 band: A (0-100 g/km)

I was looking for a small town car as we have a family seven seater and I only travel a few miles to work (but not always by car).

I've driven this particular model before and can recommend it.

This is probably one of the best little cars out there. It's nippy but there is still plenty of torque from that turbo diesel engine.

It was £99 a month previously but seems to have gone up now. It will most likely go even higher in April.

The car includes features such as front-heated windscreen, front electric windows, bluetooth stereo and sat-nav.

Great MPG, nice to drive and quite practical.

Should be a total of £3,842.80 or £160.12/net/month.
- m5rcc
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shuwaz Avatar
1m, 1w agoFound 1 month, 1 week ago
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Top Comments

(2)
16 Likes
leitchyleck
monkeyhanger75
Zontes
monkeyhanger75
Zontes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.
Most new DPF equipped cars can handle average journey length of 8 miles to prevent overloading due to changes in design (DPF closer to exhaust manifold to warm up quicker) over the first ones that came out around 10 years ago.
My newish Vauxhall takes 10 miles to get up to operating temperature. The OP was talking about using it for only a few miles. Really not suitable at all.
You're absolutely right and more observant than me :) ...a 2 or 3 mile commute for a diesel does make no sense at all, unless they have a weekly 50 mile run at the weekend to clear it. The fuel savings would be pitiful too as a cold diesel is pretty thirsty. Doing 2 miles to work in one of these from cold and you'd be lucky to crack 35mpg before your journey was over.

didn't know that! I travel 1 mile to work, diesel car is 18mths old with 9k on clock, looks like I will be changing to petrol or electric next and to think this was my first ever diesel car after 33yrs driving!


You should walk
10 Likes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.

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(60) Jump to unreadPost a comment
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10 Likes #1
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.
1 Like #2
Any other costs to consider like a £200/300 broker fee?

Even without one this is equivalent to £152.25 a month taking total costs divided by total term. This is a far better comparison value when looking at other car deals or lease vs pcp.
3 Likes #3
Zontes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.

Most new DPF equipped cars can handle average journey length of 8 miles to prevent overloading due to changes in design (DPF closer to exhaust manifold to warm up quicker) over the first ones that came out around 10 years ago.
1 Like #4
monkeyhanger75
Zontes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.

Most new DPF equipped cars can handle average journey length of 8 miles to prevent overloading due to changes in design (DPF closer to exhaust manifold to warm up quicker) over the first ones that came out around 10 years ago.


true, but they still need long ish regeneration times so every once in a while it will need a long run
2 Likes #5
monkeyhanger75
Zontes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.
Most new DPF equipped cars can handle average journey length of 8 miles to prevent overloading due to changes in design (DPF closer to exhaust manifold to warm up quicker) over the first ones that came out around 10 years ago.
My newish Vauxhall takes 10 miles to get up to operating temperature. The OP was talking about using it for only a few miles. Really not suitable at all.
2 Likes #6
Zontes
monkeyhanger75
Zontes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.
Most new DPF equipped cars can handle average journey length of 8 miles to prevent overloading due to changes in design (DPF closer to exhaust manifold to warm up quicker) over the first ones that came out around 10 years ago.
My newish Vauxhall takes 10 miles to get up to operating temperature. The OP was talking about using it for only a few miles. Really not suitable at all.

You're absolutely right and more observant than me :) ...a 2 or 3 mile commute for a diesel does make no sense at all, unless they have a weekly 50 mile run at the weekend to clear it. The fuel savings would be pitiful too as a cold diesel is pretty thirsty. Doing 2 miles to work in one of these from cold and you'd be lucky to crack 35mpg before your journey was over.
1 Like #7
Zontes
monkeyhanger75
Zontes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.
Most new DPF equipped cars can handle average journey length of 8 miles to prevent overloading due to changes in design (DPF closer to exhaust manifold to warm up quicker) over the first ones that came out around 10 years ago.
My newish Vauxhall takes 10 miles to get up to operating temperature. The OP was talking about using it for only a few miles. Really not suitable at all.

Yeah that's a fair point. However I neglected to mention the fact that I travel out of town a couple of times a month (business and personal). With work I travel at least once a month to our head office which is a 400 mile round trip. I sometimes take the car and sometimes the train (depending on how long I have to be there).

I know this car wouldn't be the best for such a long journey but like I said, its only once a month and not always by car.
#8
adamspencer95
monkeyhanger75
Zontes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.

Most new DPF equipped cars can handle average journey length of 8 miles to prevent overloading due to changes in design (DPF closer to exhaust manifold to warm up quicker) over the first ones that came out around 10 years ago.


true, but they still need long ish regeneration times so every once in a while it will need a long run


just wondered i have never owned a diesel but was thinking of getting one. how often do you think a long run is required? and what is considered along run? As i do long drives but not that often, so it depends on what is considered a long run. Thanks
1 Like #9
Shuwaz: this car would be ideal for the monthly long drives you make (possibly nowhere near as comfortable as a bigger car), but totally unsuitable for the short ones.unless you can get this on a run of at least 20 miles at sustained emgine speeds of at least 1600rpm (motorway driving or similar) once a week, you may have a DPF approaching being full of soot before you're on a journey long enough to clear it. As the DPF fills, the car gets less economical. For your driving needs i'd steer clear of a diesel. I'm no diesel hater either, we have a diesel and a petrol car in our household.
#10
monkeyhanger75
Zontes
monkeyhanger75
Zontes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.
Most new DPF equipped cars can handle average journey length of 8 miles to prevent overloading due to changes in design (DPF closer to exhaust manifold to warm up quicker) over the first ones that came out around 10 years ago.
My newish Vauxhall takes 10 miles to get up to operating temperature. The OP was talking about using it for only a few miles. Really not suitable at all.
You're absolutely right and more observant than me :) ...a 2 or 3 mile commute for a diesel does make no sense at all, unless they have a weekly 50 mile run at the weekend to clear it. The fuel savings would be pitiful too as a cold diesel is pretty thirsty. Doing 2 miles to work in one of these from cold and you'd be lucky to crack 35mpg before your journey was over.

didn't know that! I travel 1 mile to work, diesel car is 18mths old with 9k on clock, looks like I will be changing to petrol or electric next and to think this was my first ever diesel car after 33yrs driving!
#11
monkeyhanger75
Shuwaz: this car would be ideal for the monthly long drives you make (possibly nowhere near as comfortable as a bigger car), but totally unsuitable for the short ones.unless you can get this on a run of at least 20 miles at sustained emgine speeds of at least 1600rpm (motorway driving or similar) once a week, you may have a DPF approaching being full of soot before you're on a journey long enough to clear it. As the DPF fills, the car gets less economical. For your driving needs i'd steer clear of a diesel. I'm no diesel hater either, we have a diesel and a petrol car in our household.

Many thanks monkeyhanger75 (btw - are you from Hartlepool?). I'm actually considering the Ford Focus deal posted previously for £125 a month. I do like that car but I would prefer something small like the Fiesta.
1 Like #12
Zontes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.


but would you get problems in the 2 years you have it??

My wifes 1.25 i think petrol Fiesta (couple years old) gets approx 35 mpg for the daily school run (approx 5 miles). While the car she had before (a 2.0 diesel c-max) did 48-50 on the same trip-and we never had any issues at all.

Comes down to difference in monthly costs i think.
1 Like #13
For a fiver a day, who can complain. Heat added from me.
#14
The pic is different to website, anyone know the exact model?
16 Likes #15
leitchyleck
monkeyhanger75
Zontes
monkeyhanger75
Zontes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.
Most new DPF equipped cars can handle average journey length of 8 miles to prevent overloading due to changes in design (DPF closer to exhaust manifold to warm up quicker) over the first ones that came out around 10 years ago.
My newish Vauxhall takes 10 miles to get up to operating temperature. The OP was talking about using it for only a few miles. Really not suitable at all.
You're absolutely right and more observant than me :) ...a 2 or 3 mile commute for a diesel does make no sense at all, unless they have a weekly 50 mile run at the weekend to clear it. The fuel savings would be pitiful too as a cold diesel is pretty thirsty. Doing 2 miles to work in one of these from cold and you'd be lucky to crack 35mpg before your journey was over.

didn't know that! I travel 1 mile to work, diesel car is 18mths old with 9k on clock, looks like I will be changing to petrol or electric next and to think this was my first ever diesel car after 33yrs driving!


You should walk
#16
Deal_hunter1234
adamspencer95
monkeyhanger75
Zontes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.

Most new DPF equipped cars can handle average journey length of 8 miles to prevent overloading due to changes in design (DPF closer to exhaust manifold to warm up quicker) over the first ones that came out around 10 years ago.


true, but they still need long ish regeneration times so every once in a while it will need a long run


just wondered i have never owned a diesel but was thinking of getting one. how often do you think a long run is required? and what is considered along run? As i do long drives but not that often, so it depends on what is considered a long run. Thanks


a 'long run' would be 30 minutes or more at operating temperature so dependent on the journey, that might be a different mileage for each person.

diesels are designed for journeys like this continually, so ideally you'd want the opportunity for a regeneration as often as possible. it will begin to clog within a few weeks or short journeys so maybe once every 2 weeks? theres no hard and fast rule thats the issue, every DPF is different and driving habits play a large role.

if its a 2 year lease from new i wouldnt worry about it either way but a diesel wouldnt give you much benefit on such short journeys
#17
bringit
leitchyleck
monkeyhanger75
Zontes
monkeyhanger75
Zontes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.
Most new DPF equipped cars can handle average journey length of 8 miles to prevent overloading due to changes in design (DPF closer to exhaust manifold to warm up quicker) over the first ones that came out around 10 years ago.
My newish Vauxhall takes 10 miles to get up to operating temperature. The OP was talking about using it for only a few miles. Really not suitable at all.
You're absolutely right and more observant than me :) ...a 2 or 3 mile commute for a diesel does make no sense at all, unless they have a weekly 50 mile run at the weekend to clear it. The fuel savings would be pitiful too as a cold diesel is pretty thirsty. Doing 2 miles to work in one of these from cold and you'd be lucky to crack 35mpg before your journey was over.
didn't know that! I travel 1 mile to work, diesel car is 18mths old with 9k on clock, looks like I will be changing to petrol or electric next and to think this was my first ever diesel car after 33yrs driving!
You should walk

It would be free too!
#18
What other monthly fees would I have to consider when leasing a car? £110 p/m seems too good to be true.

GAP insurance?


Edited By: padamowicz93 on Mar 18, 2017 22:27
#19
Surely any DPF issues that occurred during the lease of 2 years, that have been highlighted from undertaking short journeys, would be covered by manufacturer's warranty?
banned 1 Like #20
or often scare monger you over dpf filters.
#21
HertzVanRental
Surely any DPF issues that occurred during the lease of 2 years, that have been highlighted from undertaking short journeys, would be covered by manufacturer's warranty?

Exactly. Who cares if the DPF is knackered after 24 months!

Remind me never to buy a low mileage 2 yr old diesel....
#22
HertzVanRental
Surely any DPF issues that occurred during the lease of 2 years, that have been highlighted from undertaking short journeys, would be covered by manufacturer's warranty?
This is what Ford themselves have to say regarding the DPF and the car's warranty:

"Scheduled maintenance items

The parts listed below have a limited service life and are either replaced or adjusted during scheduled maintenance operations. These parts are covered by the Ford Base Warranty up to the first point at which replacement or adjustment becomes due. The period of warranty cover for any item may not exceed the time and distance limitations of the Ford Base Warranty.

Drive belts
Spark plugs
Oil filter, air filter, pollen filter, diesel particulate filter and fuel filters."

Source: http://www.ford.co.uk/BuyingandprotectingyourFord/Warranties/New-Car

Edited By: matt101101 on Mar 18, 2017 22:50
#23
HertzVanRental
Surely any DPF issues that occurred during the lease of 2 years, that have been highlighted from undertaking short journeys, would be covered by manufacturer's warranty?

But it's no fun driving in limp home mode and having to take it to the ford dealer for a forced regeneration.
#24
matt101101
HertzVanRental
Surely any DPF issues that occurred during the lease of 2 years, that have been highlighted from undertaking short journeys, would be covered by manufacturer's warranty?
This is what Ford themselves have to say regarding the DPF and the car's warranty:
"Scheduled maintenance items
The parts listed below have a limited service life and are either replaced or adjusted during scheduled maintenance operations. These parts are covered by the Ford Base Warranty up to the first point at which replacement or adjustment becomes due. The period of warranty cover for any item may not exceed the time and distance limitations of the Ford Base Warranty.
Drive belts
Spark plugs
Oil filter, air filter, pollen filter, diesel particulate filter and fuel filters."
Source: http://www.ford.co.uk/BuyingandprotectingyourFord/Warranties/New-Car

Thanks for that matt101101, I guess the detail is in the phrase below and I may be reading it incorrectly - but, I assume it is within the 3 year warranty for the DPF?

"The period of warranty cover for any item may not exceed the time and distance limitations of the Ford Base Warranty."

Looking at the Base Warranty the detail is here:

"Base Warranty
Every new vehicle benefits from a Ford Base Warranty that is operated through Ford Authorised Dealers. This warranty covers any part of the vehicle that requires repair or replacement as a result of a manufacturing defect. The part will be repaired or replaced completely free of charge by any Ford Authorised Dealer, regardless of any change of vehicle ownership during the warranty period.

The warranty begins on the day the vehicle is delivered to the first customer."

I certainly wouldn't lease a vehicle that wasn't covered by a suitable manufacturer's warranty from new.....! oO
#25
Yeah, buy a bike! I used to work 3 miles away and cycled every day. Exercise was great.

Recently went back to Diesel. Work 14 miles away, takes me 30-35 minutes, and averaging over 60 MPG.
#26
HertzVanRental
matt101101
HertzVanRental
Surely any DPF issues that occurred during the lease of 2 years, that have been highlighted from undertaking short journeys, would be covered by manufacturer's warranty?
This is what Ford themselves have to say regarding the DPF and the car's warranty:
"Scheduled maintenance items
The parts listed below have a limited service life and are either replaced or adjusted during scheduled maintenance operations. These parts are covered by the Ford Base Warranty up to the first point at which replacement or adjustment becomes due. The period of warranty cover for any item may not exceed the time and distance limitations of the Ford Base Warranty.
Drive belts
Spark plugs
Oil filter, air filter, pollen filter, diesel particulate filter and fuel filters."
Source: http://www.ford.co.uk/BuyingandprotectingyourFord/Warranties/New-Car
Thanks for that matt101101, I guess the detail is in the phrase below and I may be reading it incorrectly - but, I assume it is within the 3 year warranty for the DPF?
"The period of warranty cover for any item may not exceed the time and distance limitations of the Ford Base Warranty."
Looking at the Base Warranty the detail is here:
"Base Warranty
Every new vehicle benefits from a Ford Base Warranty that is operated through Ford Authorised Dealers. This warranty covers any part of the vehicle that requires repair or replacement as a result of a manufacturing defect. The part will be repaired or replaced completely free of charge by any Ford Authorised Dealer, regardless of any change of vehicle ownership during the warranty period.
The warranty begins on the day the vehicle is delivered to the first customer."
I certainly wouldn't lease a vehicle that wasn't covered by a suitable manufacturer's warranty from new.....! oO
Yeah, the key thing here is what is the specified service interval on the Fiesta's DPF? The answer to which is not something I know...

The Fiesta service manual is probably available online, but I can't be bothered to find it if I'm being honest! X)
#27
No bad and hopefully a diesel scrappage scheme within two years so that's £3,654.70 minus £2,000, bargain! I love driving a diesel knowing all those kids and old folks are getting asthma for free.
#28
matt101101
HertzVanRental
matt101101
HertzVanRental
Surely any DPF issues that occurred during the lease of 2 years, that have been highlighted from undertaking short journeys, would be covered by manufacturer's warranty?
This is what Ford themselves have to say regarding the DPF and the car's warranty:
"Scheduled maintenance items
The parts listed below have a limited service life and are either replaced or adjusted during scheduled maintenance operations. These parts are covered by the Ford Base Warranty up to the first point at which replacement or adjustment becomes due. The period of warranty cover for any item may not exceed the time and distance limitations of the Ford Base Warranty.
Drive belts
Spark plugs
Oil filter, air filter, pollen filter, diesel particulate filter and fuel filters."
Source: http://www.ford.co.uk/BuyingandprotectingyourFord/Warranties/New-Car
Thanks for that matt101101, I guess the detail is in the phrase below and I may be reading it incorrectly - but, I assume it is within the 3 year warranty for the DPF?
"The period of warranty cover for any item may not exceed the time and distance limitations of the Ford Base Warranty."
Looking at the Base Warranty the detail is here:
"Base Warranty
Every new vehicle benefits from a Ford Base Warranty that is operated through Ford Authorised Dealers. This warranty covers any part of the vehicle that requires repair or replacement as a result of a manufacturing defect. The part will be repaired or replaced completely free of charge by any Ford Authorised Dealer, regardless of any change of vehicle ownership during the warranty period.
The warranty begins on the day the vehicle is delivered to the first customer."
I certainly wouldn't lease a vehicle that wasn't covered by a suitable manufacturer's warranty from new.....! oO
Yeah, the key thing here is what is the specified service interval on the Fiesta's DPF? The answer to which is not something I know...
The Fiesta service manual is probably available online, but I can't be bothered to find it if I'm being honest! X)

Yeah, me too! When I picked up a new VW diesel the other day and if the DPF warning light came on, the dealer highlighted to give it a run on a motorway for a few miles, at higher than normal revs, and the relevant warning light should go out.

I assume something similar would be in the manual having this type of vehicle as a works car that does continual short journeys - but the DPF warning light has never come on!
#29
Once we are out of the EU we can rip those DPFs off and bin them. Only time ill buy a diesel.

Edited By: Mighty__Mag on Mar 19, 2017 00:02
#30
Mighty__Mag
Once we are out of the EU we can rip those DPFs off and bin them. Only time ill buy a diesel.

You'll only buy a diesel car when it pollutes the environment even more?

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/apr/17/diesel-particulate-filter-removal-air-pollution-department-for-transport

Obviously diesel vehicles can't be completely scrapped from the roads as there's no viable alternative yet, electric and hybrid cars are no match yet. I stopped buying diesel around 2008 and never will buy one again.
#31
Zontes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.
Who cares. It's under warranty and doesn't belong to you!
#32
Apocc
Zontes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.
Who cares. It's under warranty and doesn't belong to you!
As stated in an earlier post:
"But it's no fun driving in limp home mode and having to take it to the ford dealer for a forced regeneration"
#33
Zontes
Apocc
Zontes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.
Who cares. It's under warranty and doesn't belong to you!
As stated in an earlier post:
"But it's no fun driving in limp home mode and having to take it to the ford dealer for a forced regeneration"


Agree with apocc. Who cares. You might, might have to go once to ford with a dpf issue during two years. Even that is unlikely.
I always find it amusing that people create problems out of nothing in these threads.
It's a brand new car for very little money. Lease it. Abuse it. Return it. Who cares.
#34
Is this deal missing the inevitable £200-300 processing fee?
1 Like #35
HertzVanRental
Surely any DPF issues that occurred during the lease of 2 years, that have been highlighted from undertaking short journeys, would be covered by manufacturer's warranty?

No - most lease firms have DPF clauses in their contracts.
#36
Cameron92
Is this deal missing the inevitable £200-300 processing fee?

Yes - it is.

Should be a total of £3,842.80 or £160.12/net/month.
#37
Mighty__Mag
Once we are out of the EU we can rip those DPFs off and bin them. Only time ill buy a diesel.

Wrong - it is illegal to remove a DPF. Leaving the EU will change nothing.
#38
Deal_hunter1234
just wondered i have never owned a diesel but was thinking of getting one. how often do you think a long run is required? and what is considered along run? As i do long drives but not that often, so it depends on what is considered a long run. Thanks

Unless you do 20,000 miles a year or more, need a very big vehicle such as a pick-up or a van, or need to tow something, don't buy (or even lease) a diesel.
1 Like #39
HertzVanRental
I certainly wouldn't lease a vehicle that wasn't covered by a suitable manufacturer's warranty from new.....! oO

Why would a manufacturer warranty cover self-induced DPF problems?
#40
markymark34
Zontes
Apocc
Zontes
If you are planning to use it for very short journeys, would be best to go for petrol. Diesel vehicles take quite a while to get up to optimum running temperature, and the DPF will soon give problems.
Who cares. It's under warranty and doesn't belong to you!
As stated in an earlier post:"But it's no fun driving in limp home mode and having to take it to the ford dealer for a forced regeneration"
Agree with apocc. Who cares. You might, might have to go once to ford with a dpf issue during two years. Even that is unlikely.
I always find it amusing that people create problems out of nothing in these threads.
It's a brand new car for very little money. Lease it. Abuse it. Return it. Who cares.
I assume you are basing your response on actual diesel vehicle ownership. I am, having driven diesel and petrol vehicles for over 40 years, the latest spec. diesels require a totally different type of driving technique. Short journeys are crap for fuel consumption, and in the winter the car can take up to 10 miles to fully warm up, not great on a freezing cold morning. DPF issues are very real. I take my car a blast down the motorway as soon as I am aware a DPF regeneration is occurring. If I don't do this the DPF regeneration never fully completes, and I have to drop down a gear to keep the revs above 2,000 RPM for a good 10 minutes, sometimes longer. Doing this I have managed, in four years, never to have any DPF issues. I know for sure that had I not been doing this, the DPF would be fecked by now. First diesel with a DPF I have owned, and the action required to maintain it is very real. Okay if you drive loads of miles down the motorway, but not for general daily use unless you take the remedial action I, and loads of other drivers, do.

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