Fresh Cod, half price and not farmed, line caught £7.49 a Kilo Tesco - HotUKDeals
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Fresh Cod, half price and not farmed, line caught £7.49 a Kilo Tesco

£7.49 @ Tesco
Product Information A delicate white flesh with a slightly sweet flavour. A typical portion is one loin Responsibly sourced from Well Managed Fisheries. Skinless, Boneless. Sourcing Catch… Read More
canada16 Avatar
7y, 1w agoFound 7 years, 1 week ago
Product Information

A delicate white flesh with a slightly sweet flavour. A typical portion is one loin

Responsibly sourced from Well Managed Fisheries.

Skinless, Boneless.
Sourcing

Catch Method: Line caught

Catch Region: Pacific Ocean

I got 10 massive pieces for 10.05 yesterday, Bargain
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canada16 Avatar
7y, 1w agoFound 7 years, 1 week ago
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#1
Oh, and I am aware of the lack of cod in the oceans as well.. :p
#2
Seems a good deal, when you say you got 10 massive pieces for £10.05 is 1 piece enough for a meal.
#3
canada16
Oh, and I am aware of the lack of cod in the oceans as well.. :p


I reckon thats a myth !! Who is down there counting them?
#4
What bothers me is this. The cod on the
Fish counter slab will be "Fresh" but I would
think it would have travelled from the Pacific
frozen. To then freeze again at home goes
aginst "good practice"
It's the same when "fresh" New Zealand Lamb
is on sale.
Anyone got any similar views ?
Putting aside my gripes this is a good price.
#5
andym6561
Seems a good deal, when you say you got 10 massive pieces for £10.05 is 1 piece enough for a meal.


Yes more than you would get in any resteraunt, and they are thick pieces (3/4 inch thick x 3 inches long roughly), not thin looking sick things.

And they smelled nice as well, not really fishy.
#6
canada16

And they smelled nice as well, not really fishy.


Most guys prefer it like that ;-)
#7
gluke21
What bothers me is this. The cod on the
Fish counter slab will be "Fresh" but I would
think it would have travelled from the Pacific
frozen. To then freeze again at home goes
aginst "good practice"
It's the same when "fresh" New Zealand Lamb
is on sale.
Anyone got any similar views ?
Putting aside my gripes this is a good price.


If they say you can freeze it then they have frozen and defrosted it under controlled conditions. This means you can still freeze it yourself with no worries. It is only when you defrost and refreeze things at home that there are problems.
#8
gluke21;8619318
What bothers me is this. The cod on the
Fish counter slab will be "Fresh" but I would
think it would have travelled from the Pacific
frozen. To then freeze again at home goes
aginst "good practice"
It's the same when "fresh" New Zealand Lamb
is on sale.
Anyone got any similar views ?
Putting aside my gripes this is a good price.


You haven't got it at all!

If it is labelled fresh, then it ISN'T frozen. Well not legally, if it was wrongly labelled that's another issue

Meat... same applies to whether it is frozen or not, but as for "fresh" - who wants "fresh" lamb anyway!? It needs hanging a short while at least to be tender and flavoursome. (A different issue completely it would take half a page to explain,
#9
Personally, I consider Cod to be cat food... and the thought of it costing £7.50 a kilo being "bargain" is amazing to me... but I understand some people actually like Cod, even though I rate it a very poor fish.

Try other varieties, and you will be well surprised!

Interesting programme on BBC 1 recently, where Vietnamese River Cobbler fish was being sold as Cod (illegally labelled of course) in fish & chip shops in the Manchester area.... and they did a straw poll of people, tasting both cod and this fish, ALL of whom preferred the Vietnamese fish, yet it cost 50% as much at wholesale prices!
#10
williham;8619376
If they say you can freeze it then they have frozen and defrosted it under controlled conditions. This means you can still freeze it yourself with no worries. It is only when you defrost and refreeze things at home that there are problems.


Wrong. If it has been frozen, then it needs labelling as such
#11
why is this cold, looks good
banned#12
nihcaj;8619501
Personally, I consider Cod to be cat food... and the thought of it costing £7.50 a kilo being "bargain" is amazing to me... but I understand some people actually like Cod, even though I rate it a very poor fish.

Try other varieties, and you will be well surprised!

Interesting programme on BBC 1 recently, where Vietnamese River Cobbler fish was being sold as Cod (illegally labelled of course) in fish & chip shops in the Manchester area.... and they did a straw poll of people, tasting both cod and this fish, ALL of whom preferred the Vietnamese fish, yet it cost 50% as much at wholesale prices!


Hey Nihcaj, you dont work for the Codfather do you? any new fish & chip shops open in the Midlands he puts a fishs head in their beds!
#13
nihcaj
Personally, I consider Cod to be cat food... and the thought of it costing £7.50 a kilo being "bargain" is amazing to me... but I understand some people actually like Cod, even though I rate it a very poor fish.

Try other varieties, and you will be well surprised!

Interesting programme on BBC 1 recently, where Vietnamese River Cobbler fish was being sold as Cod (illegally labelled of course) in fish & chip shops in the Manchester area.... and they did a straw poll of people, tasting both cod and this fish, ALL of whom preferred the Vietnamese fish, yet it cost 50% as much at wholesale prices!


Yes try other varieties, but deifnately not the Vietnamese river cobbler - or basa (which is appearing more and more in supermarkets).
When I found out where it came from (filthy polluted rivers) and how it it was 'produced' I threw our portions out before it came anywhere near the pan...
Worth a read - http://www.dietmindspirit.org/2008/01/30/why-you-shouldnt-eat-this-fish-pangas-pangasius-vietnamese-river-cobbler-white-catfish-gray-sole/
#14
nihcaj
You haven't got it at all!

If it is labelled fresh, then it ISN'T frozen. Well not legally, if it was wrongly labelled that's another issue

Meat... same applies to whether it is frozen or not, but as for "fresh" - who wants "fresh" lamb anyway!? It needs hanging a short while at least to be tender and flavoursome. (A different issue completely it would take half a page to explain,


You have some strange views. OK. My view of fresh was as meaning NOT frozen. You don't like fresh lamb either and cod is catfood. Go play elswhere.
#15
williham
If they say you can freeze it then they have frozen and defrosted it under controlled conditions. This means you can still freeze it yourself with no worries. It is only when you defrost and refreeze things at home that there are problems.


Thanks for your response. It clears it up for me.
banned#16
gluke21;8619318
What bothers me is this. The cod on the
Fish counter slab will be "Fresh" but I would
think it would have travelled from the Pacific
frozen. To then freeze again at home goes
aginst "good practice"
It's the same when "fresh" New Zealand Lamb
is on sale.
Anyone got any similar views ?
Putting aside my gripes this is a good price.

couldnt agree more. freezing de-frosted fish isnt a good idea but ok for a fish pie or similar.

how do they get away with saying 'fresh cod' when its been frozen?
banned#17
nihcaj;8619479
You haven't got it at all!

If it is labelled fresh, then it ISN'T frozen. Well not legally, if it was wrongly labelled that's another issue

Meat... same applies to whether it is frozen or not, but as for "fresh" - who wants "fresh" lamb anyway!? It needs hanging a short while at least to be tender and flavoursome. (A different issue completely it would take half a page to explain,

thats the point. Do you seriously expect this to have been caught by line in the pacific and shipped all the way to a tescos counter and still be fresh? :w00t:

its obviously frozen for the journey :whistling:
banned#18
BTW, frozen cod fillets are 1kg for £5 at tescos
#19
The article about the Panga fish (known as bassa) was pure scaremongering. Read
some of the morons who replied beneath that article. Its a very sloppy pièce of journalism at best. Do you really think that they would sell panga in such large quantities without noting widespread epidemics of illness?!

Cod is an excellent deal above - but I'm a bit more adventurous with my fish preferences nowadays!
banned#20
gluke21;8620069
You have some strange views. OK. My view of fresh was as meaning NOT frozen. You don't like fresh lamb either and cod is catfood. Go play elswhere.


And your point is? Cod is the most popular fish because it's also one of the blandest tasting, in fact, it hardly tastes of fish at all so it appeals to the largest market, as said before there are some great tasting fish if your a little adventurous but Mr & Mrs average will always go for the Cod which is a pity as at the rate we are fishing cod it's going to be virtually extinct in the next 20 years or so and due to our overfishing of Cod in the North sea the Cod in our supermarkets is coming from further and further away so the word "fresh" when applied to Cod should be taken with a pinch of salt.(sorry for the pun).
banned#21
SHOWMAN36;8620430
And your point is? Cod is the most popular fish because it's also one of the blandest tasting, in fact it, hardly tastes of fish at all so it appeals to the largest market, as said before there are some great tasting fish if your a little adventurous.

any recommendations?

I do like red snapper on holiday but wouldnt really know how to cook it properly over here :oops:
#22
Fresh = Fisherman catches fish in the ocean, puts it in the bottom hold of a boat in loads of ice, this keeps it really really cold and fresh (But this does not freeze the fish).

It is then taken to dock, were lorries are waiting to clean and scale then sell, they ship the items just above freezing trucks, so again, fish is still fresh and never has been frozen. This is all done from sea to store VERY QUICK.

If it was frozen, you could not dethaw, sell it on the fish counter, then tell your customers they can re-freeze.

How do you think all fishmongers in the UK get there fish, like tapia, thats not native to the UK, but yet you can still freeze and de-thaw at home?

Hope that clears things up, as used to fish in canada quite a bit.
#23
csiman
thats the point. Do you seriously expect this to have been caught by line in the pacific and shipped all the way to a tescos counter and still be fresh? :w00t:

its obviously frozen for the journey :whistling:


If that's the case, why bother selling frozen fish at all? Frozen is nearly always cheaper for a reason - it's frozen. Why not defrost everything and charge fresh prices......
Fresh fish is transported in crushed ice to keep it's temperature just above freezing, but not actually frozen - whereas frozen fish is frozen solid in freezers onboard the boat.
Fresh NZ lamb is usually flown into this country on aeroplanes which are refridgerated, frozen NZ lamb is transported on the big slow ships.
They CANNOT sell previously frozen as fresh produce in the UK, it is against the law period.
They can however sell defrosted meat / fish so long as it is labelled as such - with a clear NOT suitable for re-freezing sticker.
#24
gluke21;8620069
You have some strange views. OK. My view of fresh was as meaning NOT frozen. You don't like fresh lamb either and cod is catfood. Go play elswhere.


I have many years of professional experience in food & food safety, including Meat Inspection.

You have lack of knowledge, simple as that!

Go and get educated elsewhere.
#25
Voted hot - far cheaper than going into your local chip shop!
#26
canada16;8620529
Fresh = Fisherman catches fish in the ocean, puts it in the bottom hold of a boat in sh%t loads of ice, this keeps it really really cold and fresh (But this does not freeze the fish).

It is then taken to dock, were lorries are waiting to clean and scale then sell, they ship the items just above freezing trucks, so again, fish is still fresh and never has been frozen. This is all done from sea to store VERY QUICK.

If it was frozen, you could not dethaw, sell it on the fish counter, then tell your customers they can re-freeze.

How do you think all fishmongers in the UK get there fish, like tapia, thats not native to the UK, but yet you can still freeze and de-thaw at home?

Hope that clears things up, as used to fish in canada quite a bit.


True enough, in general, but it's NOT frozen.... it's kept marginally below 0 deg C, which doesn't QUITE freeze -as if it freezes it damages the cell structure. Of course air shipment is used, rather than sea for high value foods.

BUT..... not having any knowledge of the Pacific... who on the planet catches Cod BY LINE?
#27
cb-uk;8620980
Voted hot - far cheaper than going into your local chip shop!


And a butchers shop is cheaper than a steak house; a Flour Mill sells it's flour cheaper than a bakery sells baked bread too.

Quite how that is relevant is a mystery to me!
#28
nihcaj
True enough, in general, but it's NOT frozen.... it's kept marginally below 0 deg C, which doesn't QUITE freeze -as if it freezes it damages the cell structure. Of course air shipment is used, rather than sea for high value foods.

BUT..... not having any knowledge of the Pacific... who on the planet catches Cod BY LINE?


Uhhmmm Thats what I said, its not frozen :whistling:
banned#29
nihcaj;8620982
True enough, in general, but it's NOT frozen.... it's kept marginally below 0 deg C, which doesn't QUITE freeze -as if it freezes it damages the cell structure. Of course air shipment is used, rather than sea for high value foods.

BUT..... not having any knowledge of the Pacific... who on the planet catches Cod BY LINE?

Fair enough on the frozen point :thumbsup:

Seems the conservationists cant win :thinking:
Long-lining

Long-lining is one of the most fuel-efficient catching methods. This method is used to capture both demersal and pelagic fishes including swordfish and tuna. It involves setting out a length of line, possibly as much as 50-100 km long, to which short lengths of line, or snoods, carrying baited hooks are attached at intervals. The lines may be set vertically in the water column, or horizontally along the bottom. The size of fish and the species caught is determined by hook size and the type of bait used.
Although a selective method of catching fish, long-lining poses one of the greatest threats to seabirds. Species such as albatross, petrels, shearwaters and fulmars scavenge on baited hooks, get hooked, are dragged underwater and drowned.The problem occurs whilst the baited hooks are on or near the surface i.e. before the hook sinks. Commonly the bait used is squid, the principal prey of many seabird species. Most globally threatened species, including the majestic wandering albatross, live in the Southern Ocean.
#30
canada16;8621462
Uhhmmm Thats what I said, its not frozen :whistling:


The main point I was making was referring to LINE caught!
#31
csiman;8621507
Seems the conservationists cant win :thinking:
Long-lining

Long-lining is one of the most fuel-efficient catching methods. This method is used to capture both demersal and pelagic fishes including swordfish and tuna. It involves setting out a length of line, possibly as much as 50-100 km long, to which short lengths of line, or snoods, carrying baited hooks are attached at intervals. The lines may be set vertically in the water column, or horizontally along the bottom. The size of fish and the species caught is determined by hook size and the type of bait used.
Although a selective method of catching fish, long-lining poses one of the greatest threats to seabirds. Species such as albatross, petrels, shearwaters and fulmars scavenge on baited hooks, get hooked, are dragged underwater and drowned.The problem occurs whilst the baited hooks are on or near the surface i.e. before the hook sinks. Commonly the bait used is squid, the principal prey of many seabird species. Most globally threatened species, including the majestic wandering albatross, live in the Southern Ocean.


Tuna, swordfish, yes - I just hadn't heard of it being used for Cod!
#32
nihcaj
Wrong. If it has been frozen, then it needs labelling as such


Odd. You obviously didn't understand my reply.
#33
williham;8636207
Odd. You obviously didn't understand my reply.


Or you mine, let alone the concept behind frozen foods or Food labelling.
#34
nihcaj
Or you mine, let alone the concept behind frozen foods or Food labelling.

I wasn't talking about labelling, that's why I found your reply odd. A supermarket can quite legimiately freeze and defrost fish, selling it on the fresh counter and a customer can still take it home and freeze it and then defrost it because the supermarket froze and defrosted the fish under controlled conditions.
I don't know whether the supermarket labels it as fresh or not, but they sell it chilled, not frozen.

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