Frozen car seat £33.75 @ Mothercare - Free c&c - HotUKDeals
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Frozen car seat £33.75 @ Mothercare - Free c&c

£33.75 @ Mothercare
very good car seat I bought it for my daughter few weeks back same price it's very good quality and she loves it.
chattwali Avatar
1m, 2w agoFound 1 month, 2 weeks ago
very good car seat I bought it for my daughter few weeks back same price it's very good quality and she loves it.
chattwali Avatar
1m, 2w agoFound 1 month, 2 weeks ago
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10 Likes #1
Voting COLD....Leave the car door open overnight and save £33.75!
#2
I ordered this last week but delivery has been delayed :(...What was it like to fit?
#3
These are the Nania Imax SP Disney Group 1+2+3 Car Seat , Nania don't have a reputation for quality in crash test results.
They used just have sponge under the fabric cover to add comfort but not any protection. The ones with styrofoam or the newer memory foam give some level of impact protection. But each to their own I guess.
[

Edited By: jdRiggs on Jan 03, 2017 20:12: added detail
2 Likes #4
Cold. Front facing group 1 seats are not safe. Children should remain rear facing until at least 4 years old. This is OK as a high back booster once the child is over 4 but should not be used before that. Car seats are for saving a child's life. Buy a seat based on how safe it is, not which cartoon character is printed on it.
#5
nitro228
Cold. Front facing group 1 seats are not safe. Children should remain rear facing until at least 4 years old. This is OK as a high back booster once the child is over 4 but should not be used before that. Car seats are for saving a child's life. Buy a seat based on how safe it is, not which cartoon character is printed on it.
It is not a group 1 seat. It is a multi stage seat, agreed not the most suitable for group 1 but it does cater for group 2 (high back booster). Group 3 the backless booster is not of much consequence given the backless booster is not recommended if you can avoid it and given it comes with a backrest and all the classmates will now be encouraged to stay in the high back booster for longer it comes with a backrest so I don't see an advantage to removing it.
#6
Not a good buy, it's a very basic car seat, it won't fit well in a lot of cars (wide flat shape of the bottom and back of the seat won't suit sculpted or shaped vehicle seats) and it's very often fitted incorrectly. It's the seat used in the Watchdog tests last year (where they were investigating the fitting and sale of child seats on the high street), it didn't fare well! In one video the headrest actually detached from the rear of the seat.
1 Like #7
I did not know about all these safety checks. If it is unsafe then should not be on for sale
#8
dani80 it is very comfortable car seat and I'm not surprised that ur package is delayed that's mother care for u
3 Likes #9
Biggushlong
Voting COLD....Leave the car door open overnight and save £33.75!


You were hoping for loads of likes for this hilarious comment that you typed in bold, weren't you. Oops, awkward.
9 Likes #10
nitro228
Cold. Front facing group 1 seats are not safe. Children should remain rear facing until at least 4 years old. This is OK as a high back booster once the child is over 4 but should not be used before that. Car seats are for saving a child's life. Buy a seat based on how safe it is, not which cartoon character is printed on it.


what a foolish comment. Try keeping any 2-4 year in a rear-facing seat (if you can find one​ to fit that age...!), and you'll have one of two things: either a crying/shouting/complaining child OR the seat (in which you put it) being kicked/worn/damaged.
AND before you say "well, that's better than the child being hurt" I can assure you it is very impractical and off-putting when driving. :p
#11
nitro228
Cold. Front facing group 1 seats are not safe. Children should remain rear facing until at least 4 years old. This is OK as a high back booster once the child is over 4 but should not be used before that. Car seats are for saving a child's life. Buy a seat based on how safe it is, not which cartoon character is printed on it.


They are safe. They are just not as safe as ERF seats
2 Likes #12
Used to be a Britax trained car seat fitter for Mothercare and dreaded anyone choosing this car seat (regardless of what fabric it had on) becos it's cheap crap and trying to get a tight secure fit in most cars was near impossible. I've no dea why Mothercare are still selling it, I certainly wouldn't have one in my car for my kids.
#13
gidsterc
nitro228
Cold. Front facing group 1 seats are not safe. Children should remain rear facing until at least 4 years old. This is OK as a high back booster once the child is over 4 but should not be used before that. Car seats are for saving a child's life. Buy a seat based on how safe it is, not which cartoon character is printed on it.


what a foolish comment. Try keeping any 2-4 year in a rear-facing seat (if you can find one​ to fit that age...!), and you'll have one of two things: either a crying/shouting/complaining child OR the seat (in which you put it) being kicked/worn/damaged.
AND before you say "well, that's better than the child being hurt" I can assure you it is very impractical and off-putting when driving. :p


​It's not a foolish comment at all. Children don't know any different if you keep them rear facing. I know a couple of six year olds who are still quite happy rear facing. They've never faced forward so why would they complain?
#14
daisysmama
nitro228
Cold. Front facing group 1 seats are not safe. Children should remain rear facing until at least 4 years old. This is OK as a high back booster once the child is over 4 but should not be used before that. Car seats are for saving a child's life. Buy a seat based on how safe it is, not which cartoon character is printed on it.


They are safe. They are just not as safe as ERF seats


It depends how you define safe. To me, a car seat is nothing more than a machine for saving a child's life. They are far more likely to be killed or seriously injured in a front facing seat so I don't consider that to be safe.
1 Like #15
chattwali
I did not know about all these safety checks. If it is unsafe then should not be on for sale


​Unfortunately most people don't know about the risks associated with front facing seats. The law is slowly catching up with research but it will be many years before it becomes compulsory to have rear facing toddlers, during which time hundreds will have been killed unnecessarily as a result of front facing. Many European countries, in particular Scandinavia have kept their children rear facing for longer for decades.
#16
gidsterc
nitro228
Cold. Front facing group 1 seats are not safe. Children should remain rear facing until at least 4 years old. This is OK as a high back booster once the child is over 4 but should not be used before that. Car seats are for saving a child's life. Buy a seat based on how safe it is, not which cartoon character is printed on it.


what a foolish comment. Try keeping any 2-4 year in a rear-facing seat (if you can find one​ to fit that age...!), and you'll have one of two things: either a crying/shouting/complaining child OR the seat (in which you put it) being kicked/worn/damaged.
AND before you say "well, that's better than the child being hurt" I can assure you it is very impractical and off-putting when driving. :p


​You can find rear facing seats designed to take even up to age 6 like the Britax two way elite. There are lots of choices for up to age 4. You can get a protecter for the rear seat if you feel the need. Some kids are fine rearfacing past two years if it is a comfortable seat for the age and anyway they know no different. Their view out the back window is much better. All kids are different little personalities. If they aren't happy it's a problem and a distraction, but just because it doesn't suit your kids isn't a reason to put people off. There are plenty of examples of kids and parents that get on fine with rear facing. The challenge tends to be having leg room in the front seat rather than the child.
#18
Little cheap on toysrus
2 Likes #19
I have all this to look forward to with grandchild - and will be very interested to see the design which can accommodate a 4 or 6 year old rear-facing.
Where on earth do their legs go?
These seats must be an extraordinary design to keep a 6 year olds legs from having to be permanently bent and pushing against the back of the car seat.... which must be uncomfortable for long journeys.
My children were stage 1 rear facing, and there after all were forward facing child seats..... and then booster cushions.....
1 Like #20
Her_Indoors
I have all this to look forward to with grandchild - and will be very interested to see the design which can accommodate a 4 or 6 year old rear-facing.
Where on earth do their legs go?
These seats must be an extraordinary design to keep a 6 year olds legs from having to be permanently bent and pushing against the back of the car seat.... which must be uncomfortable for long journeys.
My children were stage 1 rear facing, and there after all were forward facing child seats..... and then booster cushions.....



​some have more legroom than others but it's not really an issue as their legs can easily be crossed if necessary. Legs aren't a huge concern as they'll find somewhere comfortable to put them. The important thing is supporting the neck and back properly in a crash. Certain seats (besafe izi modular is one I can think of) have huge amounts of legroom leg room and is rear facing to 18kg (4 years).

The fact that your children were front facing is irrelevant really - when I was younger I was in the back with no seatbelt, let alone a car seat. Fortunately I was never in an accident. The fact is there is huge amounts of evidence to support the safety advantages of rear facing, Whether people choose to ignore this evidence is entirely up to them. Eventually the law will catch up and make it a legal requirement to stay rear facing for longer. It's already moving in the right direction with booster cushions being banned, and i-size seats having to be rear facing until 15 months, but there's still a long way to go.
As I said, its entirely up to you what you decide to buy for your own offspring. The vast majority of people will be fine as they won't ever be involved in an accident, but those unfortunate or careless enough to be involved in a serious collision may regret going for the forward facing option.
1 Like #21
I used the izi combi with my last child, she was rear facing until she was 4 and had no problem with legroom. It wasn't the cheapest option but lasted a long time and felt the safety aspect was worth the outlay.
1 Like #22
Does this need to be defrosted before use?
#23
Biggushlong
Voting COLD....Leave the car door open overnight and save £33.75!
What planet are you on? Weird.
#24
nitro228
Her_Indoors
I have all this to look forward to with grandchild - and will be very interested to see the design which can accommodate a 4 or 6 year old rear-facing.
Where on earth do their legs go?
These seats must be an extraordinary design to keep a 6 year olds legs from having to be permanently bent and pushing against the back of the car seat.... which must be uncomfortable for long journeys.
My children were stage 1 rear facing, and there after all were forward facing child seats..... and then booster cushions.....
​some have more legroom than others but it's not really an issue as their legs can easily be crossed if necessary. Legs aren't a huge concern as they'll find somewhere comfortable to put them. The important thing is supporting the neck and back properly in a crash. Certain seats (besafe izi modular is one I can think of) have huge amounts of legroom leg room and is rear facing to 18kg (4 years).
The fact that your children were front facing is irrelevant really - when I was younger I was in the back with no seatbelt, let alone a car seat. Fortunately I was never in an accident. The fact is there is huge amounts of evidence to support the safety advantages of rear facing, Whether people choose to ignore this evidence is entirely up to them. Eventually the law will catch up and make it a legal requirement to stay rear facing for longer. It's already moving in the right direction with booster cushions being banned, and i-size seats having to be rear facing until 15 months, but there's still a long way to go.
As I said, its entirely up to you what you decide to buy for your own offspring. The vast majority of people will be fine as they won't ever be involved in an accident, but those unfortunate or careless enough to be involved in a serious collision may regret going for the forward facing option.

As you will no doubt be aware there are very few car seats that are sold in the UK that are compliant with i-size. Are you able to recommend something affordable? We will soon need one for out wee one and Joie Every Stage (up to 18kg rear facing I believe) is of most interest at the moment.
#25
luvvlychocolate
Used to be a Britax trained car seat fitter for Mothercare and dreaded anyone choosing this car seat (regardless of what fabric it had on) becos it's cheap crap and trying to get a tight secure fit in most cars was near impossible. I've no dea why Mothercare are still selling it, I certainly wouldn't have one in my car for my kids.


I didn't know this seat was so unsafe? My partners mum has it for our 7 year old, which seat would you recommend? We also have a two year old in a britax and a new born in a silver cross one. Can you recommend ones that you thinks are the safest? Thanks
#26
664737
Biggushlong
Voting COLD....Leave the car door open overnight and save £33.75!
What planet are you on? Weird.

Think he was trying to be funny saying the normal car seat will freeze if you leave the car door open.
#27
I too want to ask same as kazenc as a experienced person who must have fitted man seats what would you recommend.

Please just give some ideas on what we need to look for, its a genuine question and I have been through a crash and a child death so please give some good advice.
#28
aj2001
I too want to ask same as kazenc as a experienced person who must have fitted man seats what would you recommend.
Please just give some ideas on what we need to look for, its a genuine question and I have been through a crash and a child death so please give some good advice.

For optimum safety you really should only consider rear facing until at least 4 years old. The strictest car seat test in the world is the Swedish plus test. This is the only test that measures forces on the child's neck. All of the seats that have passed the test are rear facing.
You can't go wrong with seats made be Besafe or Axkid. Some only install with a seatbelt but this is just as safe as Isofix if installed properly and has the added advantage allowing the child to stay in the seat until they are bigger/heavier. (Isofix points have a weight limit of 30kg including seat which means once the child is 18kg, approx. 4 years they will need a new seat)
The safest seats tend to be more expensive, largely to do with development costs, but they are all very well made, and to a certain extent you get what you pay for. I would recommend the Axkid Minikid or the Besafe Izi modular. They're not cheap, £300- £400 but worth it if you want the absolute safest seat you can buy. Britax also do a good range of rear facing seats, which will almost all be safer than front facing.
Google Swedish plus test and rear facing toddlers and there is a wealth of information available online.
#29
Her_Indoors
I have all this to look forward to with grandchild - and will be very interested to see the design which can accommodate a 4 or 6 year old rear-facing.
Where on earth do their legs go?
These seats must be an extraordinary design to keep a 6 year olds legs from having to be permanently bent and pushing against the back of the car seat.... which must be uncomfortable for long journeys.
My children were stage 1 rear facing, and there after all were forward facing child seats..... and then booster cushions.....



​their legs are bent either at the knees or some kids sit frog leg style. They are not uncomfortable though. The seats sit further back from the back of the seat. In Scandinavia all kids are rear facing for the past number of years until school age. It is just a cultural change here. Takes a bit of time to get your head around it. :)
1 Like #30
featch
nitro228
Her_Indoors
I have all this to look forward to with grandchild - and will be very interested to see the design which can accommodate a 4 or 6 year old rear-facing.
Where on earth do their legs go?
These seats must be an extraordinary design to keep a 6 year olds legs from having to be permanently bent and pushing against the back of the car seat.... which must be uncomfortable for long journeys.
My children were stage 1 rear facing, and there after all were forward facing child seats..... and then booster cushions.....
​some have more legroom than others but it's not really an issue as their legs can easily be crossed if necessary. Legs aren't a huge concern as they'll find somewhere comfortable to put them. The important thing is supporting the neck and back properly in a crash. Certain seats (besafe izi modular is one I can think of) have huge amounts of legroom leg room and is rear facing to 18kg (4 years).
The fact that your children were front facing is irrelevant really - when I was younger I was in the back with no seatbelt, let alone a car seat. Fortunately I was never in an accident. The fact is there is huge amounts of evidence to support the safety advantages of rear facing, Whether people choose to ignore this evidence is entirely up to them. Eventually the law will catch up and make it a legal requirement to stay rear facing for longer. It's already moving in the right direction with booster cushions being banned, and i-size seats having to be rear facing until 15 months, but there's still a long way to go.
As I said, its entirely up to you what you decide to buy for your own offspring. The vast majority of people will be fine as they won't ever be involved in an accident, but those unfortunate or careless enough to be involved in a serious collision may regret going for the forward facing option.

As you will no doubt be aware there are very few car seats that are sold in the UK that are compliant with i-size. Are you able to recommend something affordable? We will soon need one for out wee one and Joie Every Stage (up to 18kg rear facing I believe) is of most interest at the moment.


​Isize has two aspects rear facing for longer and that the crash tests subjected to are more stringent so the Isize compliant ones have updated side protection to pass the test.
It is only the latest models are Isize but there are plenty of extended rear facing seats available. The Britax two way elite (twe) and axkid Minikid go to 25kg for around £200 they are better value as you should get an extra two years out of it. approx age 6
2 Likes #31
Her_Indoors
I have all this to look forward to with grandchild - and will be very interested to see the design which can accommodate a 4 or 6 year old rear-facing.
Where on earth do their legs go?
These seats must be an extraordinary design to keep a 6 year olds legs from having to be permanently bent and pushing against the back of the car seat.... which must be uncomfortable for long journeys.
My children were stage 1 rear facing, and there after all were forward facing child seats..... and then booster cushions.....



It's actually very comfortable to sit rear facing, even for a 6 year old. It's very good for them to have their legs supported, and the bigger rear facing seats are not like infant carriers, they do have a gap between the child seat and the backrest of the vehicle seat that they are installed on. When we do long journeys our younger daughter (will be 5 years old in three months and sits rear facing) never mentions her legs, the complaints we get are from our 8 year old daughter in her high backed booster! Her legs and thighs ache because they are just dangling off the front of the seat. We have to pack the footwell with soft bags so she can rest her feet on something and lift her thighs up off the seat to relieve the pressure. Rear facing is so much safer and more comfortable!
#32
andreah903
Her_Indoors
I have all this to look forward to with grandchild - and will be very interested to see the design which can accommodate a 4 or 6 year old rear-facing.
Where on earth do their legs go?
These seats must be an extraordinary design to keep a 6 year olds legs from having to be permanently bent and pushing against the back of the car seat.... which must be uncomfortable for long journeys.
My children were stage 1 rear facing, and there after all were forward facing child seats..... and then booster cushions.....
It's actually very comfortable to sit rear facing, even for a 6 year old. It's very good for them to have their legs supported, and the bigger rear facing seats are not like infant carriers, they do have a gap between the child seat and the backrest of the vehicle seat that they are installed on. When we do long journeys our younger daughter (will be 5 years old in three months and sits rear facing) never mentions her legs, the complaints we get are from our 8 year old daughter in her high backed booster! Her legs and thighs ache because they are just dangling off the front of the seat. We have to pack the footwell with soft bags so she can rest her feet on something and lift her thighs up off the seat to relieve the pressure. Rear facing is so much safer and more comfortable!

What car is this fitted to?
#33
jinsta
andreah903
Her_Indoors
I have all this to look forward to with grandchild - and will be very interested to see the design which can accommodate a 4 or 6 year old rear-facing.
Where on earth do their legs go?
These seats must be an extraordinary design to keep a 6 year olds legs from having to be permanently bent and pushing against the back of the car seat.... which must be uncomfortable for long journeys.
My children were stage 1 rear facing, and there after all were forward facing child seats..... and then booster cushions.....
It's actually very comfortable to sit rear facing, even for a 6 year old. It's very good for them to have their legs supported, and the bigger rear facing seats are not like infant carriers, they do have a gap between the child seat and the backrest of the vehicle seat that they are installed on. When we do long journeys our younger daughter (will be 5 years old in three months and sits rear facing) never mentions her legs, the complaints we get are from our 8 year old daughter in her high backed booster! Her legs and thighs ache because they are just dangling off the front of the seat. We have to pack the footwell with soft bags so she can rest her feet on something and lift her thighs up off the seat to relieve the pressure. Rear facing is so much safer and more comfortable!

What car is this fitted to?


My rear facing seat? The car is a Peugeot 5008 and I have had a Britax Multi Tech II, Diono Radian 5, Joie Stages and Joie Every Stage rear facing in it! The Britax and Diono seats rear face to 25kgs (at least 6 years for the average child) and the Joie seats are 18kgs (about 4 years).
#34
For those asking which seats are safe....personally I'd recommend Britax, Maxi Cosi, Recaro and Jane. I can't give an example of one specific seat as not all car seats fit all cars and even the safest car seat fitted incorrectly into a car can be dangerous. Shape of seat, length of seat belts, placemeant of seat belts can all impact how safely a seat can be fitted in your car. I'd personally recommend a car seat with Isofix fittings if you can afford it. ALWAYS have a car seat fitted into your car to ensure it fits correctly and you don't have 'buckle crunch' which can cause buckle to spring open on impact. Don't rely on Britax fit finder, have trained staff check the fit in your car.

Seats that turn into high back boosters....see where the seatbelt will fit across your child's neck.



Edited By: luvvlychocolate on Jan 04, 2017 16:25
1 Like #35
nitro228
chattwali
I did not know about all these safety checks. If it is unsafe then should not be on for sale


​Unfortunately most people don't know about the risks associated with front facing seats. The law is slowly catching up with research but it will be many years before it becomes compulsory to have rear facing toddlers, during which time hundreds will have been killed unnecessarily as a result of front facing. Many European countries, in particular Scandinavia have kept their children rear facing for longer for decades.


I think you might want to check your statistics before giving over-inflated figures ('hundreds'???). According to official figures, only 54 child road fatalities occurred in 2015 (53 in 2014) and of these - 39% WERE PEDESTRIANS - this isn't hundreds, even over many years!
There's no exact way to extrapolate the figures any further, but I doubt that very many of these could 'actually' be attributed to the use of a front-facing seat (perhaps 1-2 years early) as you're suggesting they are...

​https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/reported-road-casualties-in-great-britain-main-results-2015
#36
andreah903
jinsta
andreah903
Her_Indoors
I have all this to look forward to with grandchild - and will be very interested to see the design which can accommodate a 4 or 6 year old rear-facing.
Where on earth do their legs go?
These seats must be an extraordinary design to keep a 6 year olds legs from having to be permanently bent and pushing against the back of the car seat.... which must be uncomfortable for long journeys.
My children were stage 1 rear facing, and there after all were forward facing child seats..... and then booster cushions.....
It's actually very comfortable to sit rear facing, even for a 6 year old. It's very good for them to have their legs supported, and the bigger rear facing seats are not like infant carriers, they do have a gap between the child seat and the backrest of the vehicle seat that they are installed on. When we do long journeys our younger daughter (will be 5 years old in three months and sits rear facing) never mentions her legs, the complaints we get are from our 8 year old daughter in her high backed booster! Her legs and thighs ache because they are just dangling off the front of the seat. We have to pack the footwell with soft bags so she can rest her feet on something and lift her thighs up off the seat to relieve the pressure. Rear facing is so much safer and more comfortable!
What car is this fitted to?
My rear facing seat? The car is a Peugeot 5008 and I have had a Britax Multi Tech II, Diono Radian 5, Joie Stages and Joie Every Stage rear facing in it! The Britax and Diono seats rear face to 25kgs (at least 6 years for the average child) and the Joie seats are 18kgs (about 4 years).

Think you get away with it as its a MPV and have loads of space. Most std cars, guess mine being large (5series) struggle massively with rearwards as **** space, more so if tall really as you tend to go back and lower on the seat. Think only way would be to loose the passenger seat, which just wouldnt be practical - would deffo stay rear facing if could!
#37
gidsterc
nitro228
chattwali
I did not know about all these safety checks. If it is unsafe then should not be on for sale


​Unfortunately most people don't know about the risks associated with front facing seats. The law is slowly catching up with research but it will be many years before it becomes compulsory to have rear facing toddlers, during which time hundreds will have been killed unnecessarily as a result of front facing. Many European countries, in particular Scandinavia have kept their children rear facing for longer for decades.


I think you might want to check your statistics before giving over-inflated figures ('hundreds'???). According to official figures, only 54 child road fatalities occurred in 2015 (53 in 2014) and of these - 39% WERE PEDESTRIANS - this isn't hundreds, even over many years!
There's no exact way to extrapolate the figures any further, but I doubt that very many of these could 'actually' be attributed to the use of a front-facing seat (perhaps 1-2 years early) as you're suggesting they are...

​https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/reported-road-casualties-in-great-britain-main-results-2015


​Ok, so say 50 child deaths per year, take off the 39% pedestrians makes around 30 deaths per year for child passengers. Given how slowly our government moves on things like this it will likely be at least a decade before any legislation comes I to force, so yes potentially hundreds. Obviously not all of these would be avoided through rear facing but you're completely missing the point. Surely even one death or serious injury that is easily avoidable is one too many?
It is proven beyond any doubt that rear facing is safer than front facing and reduces the forces on the child's neck and back by a considerable amount. What you choose to do with the facts you're presented with is your choice.
#38
gidsterc
nitro228
Cold. Front facing group 1 seats are not safe. Children should remain rear facing until at least 4 years old. This is OK as a high back booster once the child is over 4 but should not be used before that. Car seats are for saving a child's life. Buy a seat based on how safe it is, not which cartoon character is printed on it.


what a foolish comment. Try keeping any 2-4 year in a rear-facing seat (if you can find one​ to fit that age...!), and you'll have one of two things: either a crying/shouting/complaining child OR the seat (in which you put it) being kicked/worn/damaged.
AND before you say "well, that's better than the child being hurt" I can assure you it is very impractical and off-putting when driving. :p


Not true at all, we have a rear facing seat with a weight limit of 25kgs and I have pictures of my then-6 1/2 year old daughter looking very comfortable in it. She's now 8 and our other children are 11 and 4 - I can assure you that direction of travel has no baring on how much kicking and screaming goes on in our car! Our 4 year old is very comfortable rear facing.
#39
nitro228
gidsterc
nitro228
chattwali
I did not know about all these safety checks. If it is unsafe then should not be on for sale


​Unfortunately most people don't know about the risks associated with front facing seats. The law is slowly catching up with research but it will be many years before it becomes compulsory to have rear facing toddlers, during which time hundreds will have been killed unnecessarily as a result of front facing. Many European countries, in particular Scandinavia have kept their children rear facing for longer for decades.


I think you might want to check your statistics before giving over-inflated figures ('hundreds'???). According to official figures, only 54 child road fatalities occurred in 2015 (53 in 2014) and of these - 39% WERE PEDESTRIANS - this isn't hundreds, even over many years!
There's no exact way to extrapolate the figures any further, but I doubt that very many of these could 'actually' be attributed to the use of a front-facing seat (perhaps 1-2 years early) as you're suggesting they are...

​https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/reported-road-casualties-in-great-britain-main-results-2015


​Ok, so say 50 child deaths per year, take off the 39% pedestrians makes around 30 deaths per year for child passengers. Given how slowly our government moves on things like this it will likely be at least a decade before any legislation comes I to force, so yes potentially hundreds. Obviously not all of these would be avoided through rear facing but you're completely missing the point. Surely even one death or serious injury that is easily avoidable is one too many?
It is proven beyond any doubt that rear facing is safer than front facing and reduces the forces on the child's neck and back by a considerable amount. What you choose to do with the facts you're presented with is your choice.


I would say that actually yes - all of those 30 deaths *would* be prevented by the children being in a rear facing seat (or at least all of the children under 25kgs who could potentially have been in a rear facing seat - I suppose some of the children in the statistics could have been too heavy for rear facing to be a possibility). It's been shown in Sweden that the only cases of death where the children were rear facing were due to fire or the car being crushed - situations in which the direction of travel couldn't have made a difference to the outcome. In all other cases the rear facing children survived.
#40
qwerta369
Biggushlong
Voting COLD....Leave the car door open overnight and save £33.75!
You were hoping for loads of likes for this hilarious comment that you typed in bold, weren't you. Oops, awkward.
Yeah - Only got 9. Humn.....

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