Full 5 Litres of 15W/40 engine oil just £9.99 at Lidl from 12 October - HotUKDeals
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Full 5 Litres of 15W/40 engine oil just £9.99 at Lidl from 12 October

£9.99 @ LIDL
-Full 5 litres (most oil is now supplied in 4 litre bottles) -Modern, high performance heavy-duty engine oil with synthetic additives to help extend the life of your engine and reduce wear and tear… Read More
Besford Avatar
7y, 9m agoFound 7 years, 9 months ago
-Full 5 litres (most oil is now supplied in 4 litre bottles)
-Modern, high performance heavy-duty engine oil with synthetic additives to help extend the life of your engine and reduce wear and tear
-Suitable for petrol and diesel engines
-20p/100ml

The price of branded engine oil has been going through the roof while the quantity supplied has shrunk to 4 litres. This looks like a very decent deal on the most popular grade (15W/40), suitable for both petrol and diesel engines. You could easily pay more than this for 1 litre in a service station.
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Besford Avatar
7y, 9m agoFound 7 years, 9 months ago
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1 Like #1
Do not put unbranded oil into your car. Oil is one of the main variables of how long your engine will last - it is worth the extra £30 for a quality oil. Ask any mechanic, it is just not worth it.

"most popular grade" not to be confused with overall quality.
#2
skybooks
Do not put unbranded oil into your car. Oil is one of the main variables of how long your engine will last - it is worth the extra £30 for a quality oil. Ask any mechanic, it is just not worth it.

"most popular grade" not to be confused with overall quality.

There is validity in your argument but who says this is poor oil? This is not 'recycled' market stall oil. Of course you need to check the specs on the can once it's in store to be sure it meets your car's requirements.

I wouldn't put it in my Ferrari (if I had one of those I probably wouldn't need to!) but especially for an older car or one that's using oil it may be an affordable alternative. As you indicated, full synthetic oils can be £40+ (for 4 litres); many cars simply don't need that.

Re engine life, I agree the point but would add that changing your oil more regularly may be an even better approach. How many cars have 'branded' oil then go way over time or mileage without a change?
#3
Avoid this :shock: effective multigrade crap

Since when has 1 oil been Suitable for petrol and diesel engines :? . That's why big companies like shell spend millions to develop oils to suit different engines ;-)

A 1 litre corsa or a 2.5 litre turbo using the SAME oil.................NO :roll:

You could easily pay more than this for 1 litre in a service station:) a new engines not cheap either !!!
#4
I am just warning the amateur. It is very possble that this is in fact a top quality oil, but one needs to be aware of what to look out for. Here: http://www.carbibles.com/engineoil_bible.html is a great guide on engine oil (and many other car guides).
#5
skybooks
I am just warning the amateur. It is very possble that this is in fact a top quality oil, but one needs to be aware of what to look out for. Here: http://www.carbibles.com/engineoil_bible.html is a great guide on engine oil (and many other car guides).


thanks for the links :thumbsup:
#6
skybooks
I am just warning the amateur. It is very possble that this is in fact a top quality oil, but one needs to be aware of what to look out for. Here: http://www.carbibles.com/engineoil_bible.html is a great guide on engine oil (and many other car guides).

Balanced, sensible, open minded comment. Thanks.
Personally I probably wouldn't put it in my newer car either but would be happy to use it in an older one. That may be over cautious though.

Unlike Big-Boy's rant above, the sensible approach is to check the ratings on the can (SAE or whatever) and if it meets your manufacturer's specs then it's fine.
1 Like #7
Thanks for the heads up, I'll try and get a few bottles for oil changes on my old Land Rover :-D.

It may not be the best oil on the market but at that price you can change the oil and fuel filter and engine oil more often and still be in pocket. For an older vehicle that has to be a good thing ;-).
#8
djwillis
Thanks for the heads up, I'll try and get a few bottles for oil changes on my old Land Rover :-D.

It may not be the best oil on the market but at that price you can change the oil and fuel filter and engine oil more often and still be in pocket. For an older vehicle that has to be a good thing ;-).

Sensible approach! Depending on the age of your vehicle it's probably better oil than the best which was around when it was new!
#9
I'm with "skybooks" on this one!
The fact it is suitable for petrol AND diesel engines is odd, as most branded oils usually for one or the other because of the differing additives required for each.
Note this is not a synthetic oil, it only has synthetic additives. This wording is misleading (probably intentionally).
The bottom line is to check the specification labelling on the oil (API SL/CF ACEA ) and ensure it meets the correct standard for your engine. If it doesn't, you might regret not spending the extra.
Does anyone know what the "API SL/CF ACEA" gradings are on this oil?
#10
it's effectively a semi-synthetic oil and i think it'll be ACEA A3/B3 so a decent quality at that price and better what you'll find in Asda or Tesco for £10:thumbsup:
#11
my bmw v reg 1999 3 series has done 105k miles, it is meant to have 10w/40 - would it damage it if i put this 15w/40 oil in it?
#12
zaheer2003
my bmw v reg 1999 3 series has done 105k miles, it is meant to have 10w/40 - would it damage it if i put this 15w/40 oil in it?

As indicated above you should check out the spec aginst BMW's requirements. Will vary by model and possibly the higher stressed engines (eg M3) will need fully synthetic (at £40+ for a smaller can)? No one should recommend using an oil which doesn't meet min requirements but in reality it's probably going to be fine if you have a humbler model. Certainly better than exceeding recommended service intervals.
1 Like #13
This oil complies with api sj/cf-4/cf mb228.1 229.1 acea a3/b3 a3/b4 e2 man271 volvo vds vw505 00 mtu,it complies as they did not pay oodles to the oil testers to rate it officially.On a can of castrol gtx 10w/40 at my local bp is printed the same numbering but costs £28.Petrol or diesel engines with over 75000 miles are often recommended to use 15w/40 as there is greater tolerance between moving parts,this makes for a quieter engine.Morrisons also do an oil of similar ratings for less than £9.Lidl winergy and the other make is made in germany,pay for the oil and not the name!!!!!!!!!!!!
#14
mikey2659
This oil complies with api sj/cf-4/cf mb228.1 229.1 acea a3/b3 a3/b4 e2 man271 volvo vds vw505 00 mtu,it complies as they did not pay oodles to the oil testers to rate it officially.On a can of castrol gtx 10w/40 at my local bp is printed the same numbering but costs £28.Petrol or diesel engines with over 75000 miles are often recommended to use 15w/40 as there is greater tolerance between moving parts,this makes for a quieter engine.Morrisons also do an oil of similar ratings for less than £9.Lidl winergy and the other make is made in germany,pay for the oil and not the name!!!!!!!!!!!!

Very helpful post, thanks.

Oil snobs please note!
#15
Besford
As indicated above you should check out the spec aginst BMW's requirements. Will vary by model and possibly the higher stressed engines (eg M3) will need fully synthetic (at £40+ for a smaller can)? No one should recommend using an oil which doesn't meet min requirements but in reality it's probably going to be fine if you have a humbler model. Certainly better than exceeding recommended service intervals.


I've got a 318i and it is meant to take the 10w/40 - but I read somewhere that as engines get older the seals wear out so it is better to put slightly thicker oil in cars over 100k.
#16
i normally put 10w/40 semi in my 1997 vw golf gti 8v (120k miles) but this time i'm going to use this lidl stuff as it meets the recommened specs + like others have said, i've read putting a slightly 'thicker' oil (such as 15w instead of 10w) is actually a good idea in an older engine.

all seems good to me
#17
Besford


Oil snobs please note!


You can take the horse to the water but......
#18
anyone been to buy some yet?
#19
I'll be getting some of this.

From the posts above it seems this is ideal oil for older engines. I have an oldish Daewoo (old Vauxhall Family II engine) which generally requires 10/40 oil but it loses a bit so I change the oil every six months and top up with stuff like this.

Thicker oil can help with slightly leaky engines as it "gums up" the holes lol.

As I generally pay £15/4 litres this seems like just the ticket. It'll go in the Nissan if/when it starts to leak a bit as well.
#20
Looked on the can in the shop - it has a list of specs as long as your arm.

It may not be the very best oil out there but it certainly isn't rubbish either!
#21
This 15/40 is in Lidl again at 10.99. Looks perfectly OK with a good spec range. Problem with the oil snobs is they forget that the retailer doesn't make the stuff - he only sells it as does Asda etc and I've used theirs as well -with no issues. I'll use this Lidl oil in my 30000miler RAV 4 petrol - no problem.
#22
I bought a 5 litre bottle of this oil after reading the label confirming that the API spec is actually higher than that recommended for my BMW motorcycle by the manufacturer: BMW call for API SF, SG or SH for the bike and this Lidl W5 oil is rated by API as SJ / CF. What bothers me is when I got the oil home I read in "the small print" on the label that the oil is " . . . perfectly suited to all petrol and diesel car engines, as well as those with turbochargers. . . . . . . Not suitable for 2 stroke engines, motorcycle engines, generators, outboard motors and lawnmowers."
Now I'm afraid to use the stuff. I have contacted Lidl Customer Service about this seeming oddity three times now but still haven't received an explanation as to why they say it's unsuitable for my bike. Perhaps one day they will let me know!

To clear up another point I can tell you that those API suffix letters indicate the type of engine: S denoting spark ignited engines and C denoting compression ignited or diesel engines; the following letter or letters indicating the quality of the oil, the further down the alphabet, the higher the quality of the oil. For example J is a higher grade than F, and as diesels give their oil a harder time than do petrol engines the oil is rated accordingly as API SJ / CF. So, yes, an oil can be good for both types of engine. Consult your owner's handbook !
#23
Nunkie
I bought a 5 litre bottle of this oil after reading the label confirming that the API spec is actually higher than that recommended for my BMW motorcycle by the manufacturer: BMW call for API SF, SG or SH for the bike and this Lidl W5 oil is rated by API as SJ / CF. What bothers me is when I got the oil home I read in "the small print" on the label that the oil is " . . . perfectly suited to all petrol and diesel car engines, as well as those with turbochargers. . . . . . . Not suitable for 2 stroke engines, motorcycle engines, generators, outboard motors and lawnmowers."
Now I'm afraid to use the stuff. I have contacted Lidl Customer Service about this seeming oddity three times now but still haven't received an explanation as to why they say it's unsuitable for my bike. Perhaps one day they will let me know!
To clear up another point I can tell you that those API suffix letters indicate the type of engine: S denoting spark ignited engines and C denoting compression ignited or diesel engines; the following letter or letters indicating the quality of the oil, the further down the alphabet, the higher the quality of the oil. For example J is a higher grade than F, and as diesels give their oil a harder time than do petrol engines the oil is rated accordingly as API SJ / CF. So, yes, an oil can be good for both types of engine. Consult your owner's handbook !
'Car' oils are often regarded as unsuitable for motorcycles with a wet clutch as the additives can cause the clutch to slip - or so I'm given to understand. If your bike has a dry clutch it may be OK?

Anyway, frequent oil changes (even more regularly than recommended by the manufacturer) are the cheapest maintenance you can carry out and can extend engine life considerably. Not worth taking shortcuts with oil.
#24
Well, joy of joys, Lidl wrote to me and apologised for the delay in answering my query since when I have heard absolutely nothing more from them so I'm still no wiser.
My thanks to Besford for the comment about motorcycle clutches: you may well be right on this but it doesn't explain why the oil is stated as unsuitable for lawnmowers. Incidentally my Beemer does have a dry clutch but the lawnmower, of course, has none of that kind of mechanical complexity and revs only to 3600.
Still baffled and still waiting for Lidl Customer Support to respond to my query. Not good is it.
#25
Hi all i have just got 5 liters of this oil for my good old trusty 2001 Picasso 1.6 petrol , planning oil change tomorrow if whether permits lol
#26
johnhearts1984
Hi all i have just got 5 liters of this oil for my good old trusty 2001 Picasso 1.6 petrol , planning oil change tomorrow if whether permits lol

"Found 6 years, 1 month ago"!
#27
I've just received my last communication from Lidl Customer Services and it was of absolutely no help at all. They simply aren't going to tell me why this W5 oil is declared unsuitable for motorcycles. I say "my last communication" because I won' be purchasing anything else from that company: Lidl that is, I've had it with them!
#28
Nunkie
I've just received my last communication from Lidl Customer Services and it was of absolutely no help at all. They simply aren't going to tell me why this W5 oil is declared unsuitable for motorcycles. I say "my last communication" because I won' be purchasing anything else from that company: Lidl that is, I've had it with them!
I guess the truth is they don't know; presumably the warning is simply passed on by their supplier. I'm pretty sure it's clutch related though. Maybe some (larger, ride-on?) lawnmowers also have an oil-bathed clutch?
#29
Besford, I think you're right; they just don't know, but why didn't they bother to ask their supplier: That's all I asked them to do. Instead they they gave me enough **** to alienate me as a customer: and they certainly took their time about it. I meant what I said.
#30
You have to be reasonable. Lidl's supplier is just a middle man. He won't
know any more about the oil than Lidl. You would have to go back to the
people producing the stuff and you would be lucky if you could track back
to that level.
A lot of bu**sh*t is talked about supermarket oils. No more than any other
supermarket selling oil, Lidl don't make motor oil and there is no
reason they should be cornered into answering tech questions on its
formula. The only thing you need to be concerned about is if the spec on
the label (usually a string of letters and numbers) meets the requirements
of what your car handbook states is needed. Sure, nobody is going to use it
in a F1 car but that's another world. Don't listen to the knobhead barrack
room lawyers. Most of them haven't a clue what they are on about. My 40,000
mile RAV4 has been on Asda and Lidl oils for at least 3 years and runs
sweet as a nut.
As far as motorbikes go they are just protecting themselves. Many motorbikes have wet clutches that run in oil. The oil is OK for the engine but may not suit the clutch so that's why they state not to use it. It may well be OK, but the supplier doesn't want to take the risk.

I recollect I made virtually the same noises on this forum over a year ago. Get off your high horse oil snobs. Unless you have a phd in chemicals you don't know what you're talking about.




Edited By: deniswhalls on Feb 04, 2016 21:16: Recollection
#31
deniswhalls
You have to be reasonable. Lidl's supplier is just a middle man. He won't
know any more about the oil than Lidl. You would have to go back to the
people producing the stuff and you would be lucky if you could track back
to that level.
A lot of bu**sh*t is talked about supermarket oils. No more than any other
supermarket selling oil, Lidl don't make motor oil and there is no
reason they should be cornered into answering tech questions on its
formula. The only thing you need to be concerned about is if the spec on
the label (usually a string of letters and numbers) meets the requirements
of what your car handbook states is needed. Sure, nobody is going to use it
in a F1 car but that's another world. Don't listen to the knobhead barrack
room lawyers. Most of them haven't a clue what they are on about. My 40,000
mile RAV4 has been on Asda and Lidl oils for at least 3 years and runs
sweet as a nut.
As far as motorbikes go they are just protecting themselves. Many motorbikes have wet clutches that run in oil. The oil is OK for the engine but may not suit the clutch so that's why they state not to use it. It may well be OK, but the supplier doesn't want to take the risk.
I recollect I made virtually the same noises on this forum over a year ago. Get off your high horse oil snobs. Unless you have a phd in chemicals you don't know what you're talking about.


It's not the clutch, my bike has a dry clutch. And the spec on the label is more than suitable for the bike but, as you rightly state, I haven't got a phD in chem and I don't know what I'm talking about so I wanted Lidl Customer Services to do me the courtesy of asking their supplier: that's all. And so without that information I'm afraid to use the 'kin stuff. I'll probably spray it underneath my Land Rover as a rust inhibitor or something: I'd use it in the engine only it's of too high a viscosity for it. I'll not be buying any more though.
1 Like #32
Nunkie
deniswhalls
You have to be reasonable. Lidl's supplier is just a middle man. He won't
know any more about the oil than Lidl. You would have to go back to the
people producing the stuff and you would be lucky if you could track back
to that level.
A lot of bu**sh*t is talked about supermarket oils. No more than any other
supermarket selling oil, Lidl don't make motor oil and there is no
reason they should be cornered into answering tech questions on its
formula. The only thing you need to be concerned about is if the spec on
the label (usually a string of letters and numbers) meets the requirements
of what your car handbook states is needed. Sure, nobody is going to use it
in a F1 car but that's another world. Don't listen to the knobhead barrack
room lawyers. Most of them haven't a clue what they are on about. My 40,000
mile RAV4 has been on Asda and Lidl oils for at least 3 years and runs
sweet as a nut.
As far as motorbikes go they are just protecting themselves. Many motorbikes have wet clutches that run in oil. The oil is OK for the engine but may not suit the clutch so that's why they state not to use it. It may well be OK, but the supplier doesn't want to take the risk.
I recollect I made virtually the same noises on this forum over a year ago. Get off your high horse oil snobs. Unless you have a phd in chemicals you don't know what you're talking about.
It's not the clutch, my bike has a dry clutch. And the spec on the label is more than suitable for the bike but, as you rightly state, I haven't got a phD in chem and I don't know what I'm talking about so I wanted Lidl Customer Services to do me the courtesy of asking their supplier: that's all. And so without that information I'm afraid to use the 'kin stuff. I'll probably spray it underneath my Land Rover as a rust inhibitor or something: I'd use it in the engine only it's of too high a viscosity for it. I'll not be buying any more though.
Nunkie, I wasn't referring to you personally. All I'm saying is that you read a lot of pontification about oil and it's just opinions more than from knowledge. People make the assumption that because oil is sold by Asda, Lidl, Tesco etc that it can't be any good and I don't think that's justified. I appreciate that you would be wary about using it in the bike as the label warns you of this but should be no problem for standard production car engines. Incidentally the picture of the can of oil at the top of the page is exactly what I'm using in the RAV4.




Edited By: deniswhalls on Feb 05, 2016 22:36: Spelling
#33
deniswhalls
Nunkie
deniswhalls
You have to be reasonable. Lidl's supplier is just a middle man. He won't
know any more about the oil than Lidl. You would have to go back to the
people producing the stuff and you would be lucky if you could track back
to that level.
A lot of bu**sh*t is talked about supermarket oils. No more than any other
supermarket selling oil, Lidl don't make motor oil and there is no
reason they should be cornered into answering tech questions on its
formula. The only thing you need to be concerned about is if the spec on
the label (usually a string of letters and numbers) meets the requirements
of what your car handbook states is needed. Sure, nobody is going to use it
in a F1 car but that's another world. Don't listen to the knobhead barrack
room lawyers. Most of them haven't a clue what they are on about. My 40,000
mile RAV4 has been on Asda and Lidl oils for at least 3 years and runs
sweet as a nut.
As far as motorbikes go they are just protecting themselves. Many motorbikes have wet clutches that run in oil. The oil is OK for the engine but may not suit the clutch so that's why they state not to use it. It may well be OK, but the supplier doesn't want to take the risk.
I recollect I made virtually the same noises on this forum over a year ago. Get off your high horse oil snobs. Unless you have a phd in chemicals you don't know what you're talking about.
It's not the clutch, my bike has a dry clutch. And the spec on the label is more than suitable for the bike but, as you rightly state, I haven't got a phD in chem and I don't know what I'm talking about so I wanted Lidl Customer Services to do me the courtesy of asking their supplier: that's all. And so without that information I'm afraid to use the 'kin stuff. I'll probably spray it underneath my Land Rover as a rust inhibitor or something: I'd use it in the engine only it's of too high a viscosity for it. I'll not be buying any more though.
Nunkie, I wasn't referring to you personally. All I'm saying is that you read a lot of pontification about oil and it's just opinions more than from knowledge. People make the assumption that because oil is sold by Asda, Lidl, Tesco etc that it can't be any good and I don't think that's justified. I appreciate that you would be wary about using it in the bike as the label warns you of this but should be no problem for standard production car engines. Incidentally the picture of the can of oil at the top of the page is exactly what I'm using in the RAV4.

Yeah, I take your point den, that oil, if the viscosity range is suitable, is of a very high spec: API SN if I remember correctly and if the Land Rover wanted that viscosity I would use it all the time. I was just disappointed that, having bought it, I couldn't use it in any of my toys.

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