Garmin GPS 60 - Hiking LCD GPS Receiver - Was £130.00 Now £63.61 @ Tesco Direct - HotUKDeals
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Free to collect. Also 3% cashback through quidco.

This yellow plastic and rubber GPS is water resistant. It comes with trip and waypoint manager CD Rom, wrist strap and PC cable for a PC link. 100 wapoints & 20 routes. 1Mb internal memory with preloaded worldwide cities. This GPS has 28 hours AA battery life. It requires 2xAA batteries.

Features:
Unit dimensions, WxHxD: 2.4" x 6.1" x 1.3" (6.1 x 15.5 x 3.3 cm)
Display size, WxH: 1.5" x 2.2" (3.8 x 5.6 cm)
Display resolution, WxH: 160 x 240 pixels
Display type: 4 level gray LCD
Weight: 7.0 oz (198 g) with batteries
Battery: 2 AA batteries (not included)
Battery life: up to 28 hours
Waterproof: yes (IPX7)
PC interface: serial and USB
RoHS version available: yes

Maps & Memory:
Basemap: no
Ability to add maps: accepts points of interest data
Built-in memory: 1 MB
Waypoints: 500
Routes: 50
Track log: 10,000 points, 20 saved tracks

Other Features:
Geocaching mode: yes
Outdoor GPS games: yes
Hunt/fish calendar: yes
Sun and moon information: yes
Area calculation: yes
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whizzkid Avatar
7y, 11m agoFound 7 years, 11 months ago
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(33) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
http://direct.tesco.com/pi/Enlarge/4/SS07200-5254TPS102659.jpg
#2
"1MB of internal memory. "

humm that's leave a lot of space for maps..lol

Great deal though heat added.
#3
There are better units out there ... won't accept any memory cards.

Still for a waterproof, AA-powered GPS receiver it's not bad value.

You can add waypoints etc, just no maps.
#4
good value. not a mapping gps like the gpsmap series but you don't necessarily need them on the unit itsel, particulalrly if you get yourself some digital mapping on your pc.

I have a gpsmap 60csx which is excellent and this uses a lot of similar components but is a few quid more

R.
#5
maybe i'm old but whatever happened to just using a compass and as OS 1:25000 map. Everything these days seems to make people devoid of any kind of skill and reliance on technology , gps breaks down and they haven't a clue ????
i sound like i am turning into my da , a grumpy old man , but seriously whats wrong with a compass ??
#6
a compass tells you where the north pole is, this things tells you where you are :)
#7
desdan;4008293
maybe i'm old but whatever happened to just using a compass and as OS 1:25000 map. Everything these days seems to make people devoid of any kind of skill and reliance on technology , gps breaks down and they haven't a clue ????
You can apply plenty of skill with your GPS receiver by contributing to OpenStreetMap.
#8
desdan;4008293
maybe i'm old but whatever happened to just using a compass and as OS 1:25000 map. Everything these days seems to make people devoid of any kind of skill and reliance on technology , gps breaks down and they haven't a clue ????
i sound like i am turning into my da , a grumpy old man , but seriously whats wrong with a compass ??


...and let's go back to washing clothes on a rock in a stream, carrying sundials for time-keeping... and ...and :thumbsup:

From some-one who has no less than 5 GPS units, two Garmin Streetpilots in the cars, two bluetooth units to use with our Ipaqs - equipped with Ord Survey mapping - and finally a Garmin handheld for everything else!

This mono unit, without memory-card expansion and road/topo mapping is pretty basic by current standards. Great for newbie geo-cachers or walkers but you'll be wanting to upgrade soon afterwards.....:whistling:

...and I've carried a compass around for years - and never used it!
#9
hus52
a compass tells you where the north pole is, this things tells you where you are :)


bearings , map . compass duh??????:oops:
#10
Hmmmm always fancied a bit of geocaching with the family. Pity i can't afford this with it being just after Christmas :-(
#11
desdan
bearings , map . compass duh??????:oops:


I for one would much rather use a GPS (not necessarily this one) than an OS map with a compass. It is a lot easier and avoids the inevitable arguments when everyone thinks we should be going different ways!
#12
hus52
a compass tells you where the north pole is, this things tells you where you are :)


LOL.

I once misread a map whilst mountainbiking and ended up coming down a route that was pretty hairy. Granted I need to improve my map and mountainbike skills, but if a GPS can help me make the right turn I'm not going to ba a lost luddite for nostalgia's sake.
banned#13
you gotta be pretty stupid to have the need for one of these if your out walking
probalby wouldnt be able to use it and have to call on the emergency services to rescu your sorry ass
#14
OK. So lets have the compromise. I love the OS maps and will always pick them up at car boots and charity shops. They are sooooo interesting. But I've always wanted a gps and think I will go for this one. So gps in one hand and an os in the other........... should make for some really intesting walking and touring.

A good find and heat added.
#15
Bernie
...and let's go back to washing clothes on a rock in a stream, carrying sundials for time-keeping... and ...and :thumbsup:

From some-one who has no less than 5 GPS units, two Garmin Streetpilots in the cars, two bluetooth units to use with our Ipaqs - equipped with Ord Survey mapping - and finally a Garmin handheld for everything else!

This mono unit, without memory-card expansion and road/topo mapping is pretty basic by current standards. Great for newbie geo-cachers or walkers but you'll be wanting to upgrade soon afterwards.....:whistling:

...and I've carried a compass around for years - and never used it!
#16
You will be using it if someone p****s off the yanks and they switch the whole system off.
#17
aberfal;4009246
you gotta be pretty stupid to have the need for one of these if your out walking
Perhaps you should improve your spelling before you accuse others of being stupid. ;-)
#18
not a bad deal albeit a fairly basic gps device
#19
desdan
maybe i'm old but whatever happened to just using a compass and as OS 1:25000 map. Everything these days seems to make people devoid of any kind of skill and reliance on technology , gps breaks down and they haven't a clue ????
i sound like i am turning into my da , a grumpy old man , but seriously whats wrong with a compass ??


Well I think you'd be stupid to do a serious climb like ben nevis in the autum (for example) where there is a lot of coving of the snow on sheer cliff drops so you could be out of your reliable map reading by not-a-lot and still fall over the edge.

This is by no means a guarentee but it CAN be usefull... I was stuck almost pinned down by zero - i mean near zero visability on snowdon (we'd sorta ignored the severe weather warnings as thought we'd be back before it was due to come - yes stupid) - and something like this would have certainly helped.

It should be used as an AID only i agree but at the same time its a good deal for a basic outdoor gps :-) thumbs up!
#20
I kinda like the looks of this, also from Tesco:

http://direct.tesco.com/q/R.204-9191.aspx

Looks like a good price but the reviews are pants!
#21
desdan
maybe i'm old but whatever happened to just using a compass and as OS 1:25000 map. Everything these days seems to make people devoid of any kind of skill and reliance on technology , gps breaks down and they haven't a clue ????
i sound like i am turning into my da , a grumpy old man , but seriously whats wrong with a compass ??


I understand where you're coming from but in dense fog and at night they can save your life, I use both.
#22
matt_n_mich
Well I think you'd be stupid to do a serious climb like ben nevis in the autum (for example) where there is a lot of coving of the snow on sheer cliff drops so you could be out of your reliable map reading by not-a-lot and still fall over the edge.

This is by no means a guarentee but it CAN be usefull... I was stuck almost pinned down by zero - i mean near zero visability on snowdon (we'd sorta ignored the severe weather warnings as thought we'd be back before it was due to come - yes stupid) - and something like this would have certainly helped.

It should be used as an AID only i agree but at the same time its a good deal for a basic outdoor gps :-) thumbs up!



Snowdon may be the highest, and most famous mountain in wales, but it is by far one of the most easy walks in the UK. Whatever the weather, Snowdon is safe.

Did Pen yr ole wen last weekend. About -10 at the summit and lots of snow and ice and 10' visability. The only safe way down was a steep scramble. A compas and a sensible attitude got us down before dark. I'd never trust this alone. Learn the basics of map reading any you'll be fine.
#23
aberfal;4009246
you gotta be pretty stupid to have the need for one of these if your out walking
probalby wouldnt be able to use it and have to call on the emergency services to rescu your sorry ass


Joined a hill walking exped in the Cairngorms a few years back to make up the numbers. I took my Garmin Vista, Ipaq (& BT GPS) along to record our meanderings in Memory-Map. The leaders plotted the routes in the traditional way, I then punched the co-ords into MM and showed the team 3D fly-throughs on my laptop. On our return, it was amusing to download the actual routes walked over the planned route and see how far out the compasss & map brigade were!

On one walk, I did interject and point out that the team was setting off after a rest nearly 180 degrees from the planned route! "Who says so?", "My GPS...."

I got into GPS using a device, much like the item posted here, to direct my wife and I on long 50 mile cycle trips through the country roads of Norfolk where we live. They all look the same, most are called "The Street" and they turn about like snakes. Using a map was slow, tedious and quite frankly, spoiled the ride. A GPS on the handlebars was magic! It enables us to enjoy the countryside instead of constantly having to stop every 15 mins, work out where we were and work out the next bit of route.

...and having a GPS doesn't stop you carrying map & compass - I do - but rarely need to refer to them.:thumbsup:
#24
nonstop;4011554
Whatever the weather, Snowdon is safe.
What a strange thing to say. Nowhere is safe whatever the weather, if you can't get out of it, which you can't if you're in the middle of nowhere.
#25
Just out of interest then whilst the experienced users are here, if we buy something better up the Garmin range, say a Legand or Vista which are the better maps to use with tthese models to replace 1:25,0000 OS maps?

What I mean is, with OS maps you can plan your route along all the field public footpaths before hand etc. but the Garmin TOPO maps or even many Memory Maps don't show enough detail to be able to do that? Surely this is useless other than being able to plot various 'waypoints' that give a general direction. Butt without detail in the electronic maps you haven't an idea what obstacles may be in the way and the general direction of any footpaths? Appreciate I may have missed the point somewhere, but all the electronic GPS mapping seems to do is show 'the next waypoint is over there somewhere' but you would still need an OS map to get you there so you can see the footpaths (unless you have thsee newer £300 GPS's?)

Thanks for any advice.
#26
Memory Maps does 1:25,0000 OS so I plot on the pc and then upload to my Garmin. I've a really basic Geko with no mapping at all, other than some waypoints that I've programmed in over the years and it's saved my bacon on a number of occasions.
If I'm going out on my MTB somewhere remote and doing an all dayer I'll print out a A4 map or two from Memory Map as well too ..just in case..
#27
Compasses? Bah how posey. Have you never heard of a needle on a string? That's what real men use. It was good enough for Tony Curtis in The Vikings.
#28
pibpob
What a strange thing to say. Nowhere is safe whatever the weather, if you can't get out of it, which you can't if you're in the middle of nowhere.


Go up snowdon, then try a few of the smaller ones next to it. You'll soon get the idea.
#29
nonstop
Snowdon may be the highest, and most famous mountain in wales, but it is by far one of the most easy walks in the UK. Whatever the weather, Snowdon is safe.

Did Pen yr ole wen last weekend. About -10 at the summit and lots of snow and ice and 10' visability. The only safe way down was a steep scramble. A compas and a sensible attitude got us down before dark. I'd never trust this alone. Learn the basics of map reading any you'll be fine.


Easy, depending on route and WEATHER, yes...

As I said it should be used as an AID only...

And as for safe... as a 'climb' or 'walk', reletively yes, but in the winter this is not neccerserially true, otherwise there would not be 'severe weather warnings'. Being what 7 years ago or something I cant remember EXACTLY where we were when this happenned... I was not worried about dying, but what I did say is it would have HELPED, even on a reletively easy situation...

I'm not trying to argue btw :-) I just dont want inexperianced people to just forsake the possible use of one because someone says 'you dont need it' or 'its safe without it'.

And to counder the safety arguement (from:- http://www.go4awalk.com/discussions/pathwarningsigns.php):
"During Winter 2006/2007 110 people were rescued from the Snowdon/Ogwen areas alone. Every year approximately 10 people die and 150 are injured in Snowdonia."
#30
aberfal
you gotta be pretty stupid to have the need for one of these if your out walking
probalby wouldnt be able to use it and have to call on the emergency services to rescu your sorry ass


Depends on the type of walking/trekking you do. Well-known, clearly-marked paths obviously no need, some of the less trodden areas .. they can get you back to where you need to be without the need for emergency services. On a mountain bike I've been out with some pretty seasoned outdoors types and they've made use of them when we've missed trails lost in the snow/mud. You don't want to use one aberfal, no problem, but please don't patronise those of us who might.
#31
nonstop;4015719
Go up snowdon, then try a few of the smaller ones next to it. You'll soon get the idea.
I don't need to go there to know that getting lost in a blizzard is not safe!
#32
OK I'll eat my hat. I think I'd use one of these. I did a trip to Skye last year. The Cullins are magnetic.
#33
nonstop
OK I'll eat my hat. I think I'd use one of these. I did a trip to Skye last year. The Cullins are magnetic.


Oh yeah never thought of that... if I had I'd had I'd have used that in my arguement for keeping something like this on you...:thumbsup:

When I went on training hikes or 'tabs' as we called em in the forces the instructors (when we had them) used to ordinarially have something gps related as backup, never remember using it for anything other then to show some people they were reading the map wrong! :w00t:

Not me of course tho ;-) ;-)

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