Griddle Pan for Induction Hobs - £19.99 Russell Hobbs direct - HotUKDeals
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Although you can get a griddle pan for a tenner or so at most places, most of these are aluminium or plain steel and won't work on an induction hob. For induction hob owners the choice is fairly limited, because of the induction base the pans tend to be fairly expensive - in the £40 to £60 range. I've been looking out for one for ages, and finally found one for under £20, reduced from £45 delivery is free. I've tried it out and found it to be good quality, works well so I thought I'd share it. Not bothered about heat but hoping this can help other induction hob owners who might be missing a griddle pan.

27cm Black Tiempo Griddle Pan
Features/Specification
27 cm cast aluminium induction griddle pan
Soft touch handle available in black
Removable space saving handle
Induction base
High quality Akzo Nobel non-stick coating allows easy cleaning and prevents food sticking
Model No.14959
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androoski Avatar
6y, 9m agoFound 6 years, 9 months ago
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#1
Own an induction hob myself & agree with you. This is about the same price as a cast iron griddle pan, without the hassle of seasoning it, so voted HOT.
2 Likes #2
Plain steel pans are fine on induction hobs... it's STAINLESS steel that's not, and a stainless steel frying pan is as much use as a chocolate teapot anyway!

I wouldn't use Aluminium pans if they were free, but apart from the dangers inherent with ingesting the metal, Aluminium is going to warp before long on proper HOT cooking anyway. ALL non-stick surfaces fail with HIGH cooking temperatures after a while, the only non-stick I buy now is a frying pan for eggs, and even a\t those low temperatures they don't last very long!

IKEA has PLAIN (not ribbed) cast iron that works on induction hobs or any other for that matter for just £6.99
http://www.ikea.com/gb/en/catalog/products/20114265
(I have a ribbed one, but prefer plain surface anyway, the ribbing just means the food cooks slower and browns less... but they are available cheap elsewhere too, if you NEED to have the marks)

Seasoning is no hassle, you must be doing it wrong if it is. Few minutes of heating a thin smear of oil on the pan first time, then just avoid scouring it afterwards (stick it on heat when you wash it to dry and carbonise it further) is all it needs. This type of pan is mainly for cooking the likes of meats at high temperatures, oil the meat not the pan, and leave the item along for a while, and it will just unstick, even if it has stuck because the pan is till fairly new and unblackened!!
#3
nihcaj
Plain steel pans are fine on induction hobs... it's STAINLESS steel that's not, and a stainless steel frying pan is as much use as a chocolate teapot anyway!

I wouldn't use Aluminium pans if they were free, but apart from the dangers inherent with ingesting the metal, Aluminium is going to warp before long on proper HOT cooking anyway. ALL non-stick surfaces fail with HIGH cooking temperatures after a while, the only non-stick I buy now is a frying pan for eggs, and even a\t those low temperatures they don't last very long!

IKEA has PLAIN (not ribbed) cast iron that works on induction hobs or any other for that matter for just £6.99
http://www.ikea.com/gb/en/catalog/products/20114265
(I have a ribbed one, but prefer plain surface anyway, the ribbing just means the food cooks slower and browns less... but they are available cheap elsewhere too, if you NEED to have the marks)

Seasoning is no hassle, you must be doing it wrong if it is. Few minutes of heating a thin smear of oil on the pan first time, then just avoid scouring it afterwards (stick it on heat when you wash it to dry and carbonise it further) is all it needs. This type of pan is mainly for cooking the likes of meats at high temperatures, oil the meat not the pan, and leave the item along for a while, and it will just unstick, even if it has stuck because the pan is till fairly new and unblackened!!


That's quite a bit of good advice. Rep.
#4
nihcaj

(I have a ribbed one, but prefer plain surface anyway, the ribbing just means the food cooks slower and browns less... but they are available cheap elsewhere too, if you NEED to have the marks)

!!


Agreed, but the ribs also allow you to cook whatever you are cooking out of the juices. I have the unribbed pan already (that ikea one). Works well, doesn't get as hot as quickly as some others though. I just needed a ribbed pan to complete the set (I even have an induction wok, although that was no bargain).
#5
Found a cheap ribbed pan too... not got this myself, so unsure of it's quality... but cast iron should last decades unles it's been defectively cast or gets dropped from a great height, so it's harldy the risk of a lifetime!
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Kitchen-Craft-Deluxe-Grill-Square/dp/B0001IWZ7W/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=kitchen&qid=1267972479&sr=8-5

Another tip for griddle users... plonk another cast iron pan on top of the food - works as well or better than a grill press (eg. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Typhoon-Cast-Square-Grill-Press/dp/B001KBYYD2/ref=sr_1_26?ie=UTF8&s=kitchen&qid=1267972653&sr=8-26 that's the one I have!), but it's cheaper, and actually easier to wash! I used to heat the top press iron, and you can heat up the pan you put on top if you want, but I find that because it's not quite as hot as the pan below, it does tends to stick more than the bottom, so I just use it cold to press the meat onto the pan now, reduces steaks curling up, and cooks evenly! Not as quick as the hot method, but less trouble
#6
androoski;8039357
Agreed, but the ribs also allow you to cook whatever you are cooking out of the juices. I have the unribbed pan already (that ikea one). Works well, doesn't get as hot as quickly as some others though. I just needed a ribbed pan to complete the set (I even have an induction wok, although that was no bargain).


I bought an Induction hob (small one) as a gift for a friend who lives in a very small flat, so have only tried wok cooking on an induction hob once, and found the standard carbon steel woke not too good - the hob was cutting out before it got to the high heats it was capable of - I presume this is one situation where a cast iron wok could be very useful, rather than the steel one which is what I would normally recommend for gas.

Only drawback of cast iron pans, they are great for meat or steaks or griddling veg, but as they not quite as fine textured a surface as the carbon steel, they are not quite as stick resistant with more delicate foods as the smoother steel version. My large carbon steel frying pan is only about 10 years old... so it's still getting better! :whistling:
#7
nihcaj
I bought an Induction hob (small one) as a gift for a friend who lives in a very small flat, so have only tried wok cooking on an induction hob once, and found the standard carbon steel woke not too good - the hob was cutting out before it got to the high heats it was capable of - I presume this is one situation where a cast iron wok could be very useful, rather than the steel one which is what I would normally recommend for gas.

Only drawback of cast iron pans, they are great for meat or steaks or griddling veg, but as they not quite as fine textured a surface as the carbon steel, they are not quite as stick resistant with more delicate foods as the smoother steel version. My large carbon steel frying pan is only about 10 years old... so it's still getting better! :whistling:


I've found induction to light years ahead for most things but not so great for wok cooking, because you need the heat up around the sides and not just from below, I had to get a wok with the induction base that sort of wraps up the curve a bit, but it was outrageously expensive. I've since decided that a wok burner is needed so am getting one fitted next month.

I should have put in the description that the base on this griddle pan is one that is optimised for induction, using lots of little steel cores of the exact size for the induction field, and thus is much lighter than a cast iron. It will get very hot very quick too if turned up.
#8
androoski;8040224
I've found induction to light years ahead for most things but not so great for wok cooking, because you need the heat up around the sides and not just from below, I had to get a wok with the induction base that sort of wraps up the curve a bit, but it was outrageously expensive. I've since decided that a wok burner is needed so am getting one fitted next month.

I should have put in the description that the base on this griddle pan is one that is optimised for induction, using lots of little steel cores of the exact size for the induction field, and thus is much lighter than a cast iron. It will get very hot very quick too if turned up.


Ah.. I see the idea.

Oh for a proper chinese wok burner... the turbo type!.... http://www.jpburners.co.uk/cookers.html but I think it would be a bit out of proportion for a domestic kitchen!

I had actually wondered about the commercial wok burners though... 185 quid is not silly pricing, have not seen one in action though:
eg item 250578880126 on eBay

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