Hard Drive Recovery Service from Freecom - 3yr subscription £24.95 - HotUKDeals
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Not a deal per-se, but I consider this to be a good offer all the same.

If you have a hard drive fail, you've lost everything - MP3's, pictures, documents, movies, the lot. You are also looking at a big bill to get the data back from a data recovery specialist (I know, it cost me £300 to get my wedding photos back off a failed laptop hard drive).

Freecom have introduced a service where you pay and register up front for the service in case you need to use it.
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#1
That seems reasonable for a professional company to do it.
Althought the software to do it yourself can be found for free online, providing you have another pc.
#2
this will also save data from a dead HD i.e. if motor or heads have seazed. good price considering it cost me £1000 to get 1tb of data back from Seagate a couple of years back
#3
Not a bad deal indeed, might look into it. Mind you at £25 per HD it might end up costing me quite a bit...
#4
I think this is a very good offer if it covers physical & mechanical crashes . I think only people who have had their hard drive crash with valuable data on it, would appropriate the offer . . it's not a case of Will It Happen, But when it will Happen
#5
shaz2sxy
this will also save data from a dead HD i.e. if motor or heads have seazed. good price considering it cost me £1000 to get 1tb of data back from Seagate a couple of years back


You mean you didn't have a backup? Expensive lesson learned I hope.
#6
Seems pointless, ensure you backup your data sensibly and most people would never have any call for this service.
#7
cheap enough to have more than one external hd to back up and duplicate it, maybe even a desktop dock to use bare hard drives. My important stuff is duplicated across 2 laptops, a desktop and 2 external drives. Be unlikely all would fail at same time.
2 Likes #8
shaz2sxy
this will also save data from a dead HD i.e. if motor or heads have seazed. good price considering it cost me £1000 to get 1tb of data back from Seagate a couple of years back

Blimey! what was on there? Was it the secret of eternal life?
#9
Agreed! If your data is THAT important why not backup to an external HD? This service is about as useful as a paid-for extended warranty on a new TV. Not worth it.
#10
waj1234
cheap enough to have more than one external hd to back up and duplicate it, maybe even a desktop dock to use bare hard drives. My important stuff is duplicated across 2 laptops, a desktop and 2 external drives. Be unlikely all would fail at same time.


Are these computers and drives all in the one physical location e.g. your home?
What would happen if your house burned down?
Ensure you store an encrypted copy of your data off site e.g. work, a friends house.

People are generally too lazy to take backups then get frustrated when drives fail. There are many free tools to backup your data to online services. DVDs are cheaper than a packet of crisps. There's no excuse really.
#11
Ironic that quite a decent deal for offsite backup service Crashplan was spammed yesterday as it offered much better value for money.

Recovering data from a damaged drive is no guarantee, a friend spent £300 on recovering a laptop drive last year and got absolutely nothing back.

I use Carbonite myself, which backs up whichever folders you select to their servers online, set it once then forget it until you need it.
#12
arduino
shaz2sxy
this will also save data from a dead HD i.e. if motor or heads have seazed. good price considering it cost me £1000 to get 1tb of data back from Seagate a couple of years back


You mean you didn't have a backup? Expensive lesson learned I hope.



Listen to Mr Perfect! He's right of course, but won't make many friends this way.(_;)
#13
Besford
arduino
shaz2sxy
this will also save data from a dead HD i.e. if motor or heads have seazed. good price considering it cost me £1000 to get 1tb of data back from Seagate a couple of years back


You mean you didn't have a backup? Expensive lesson learned I hope.



Listen to Mr Perfect! He's right of course, but won't make many friends this way.(_;)


Mr. Perfect? Hardly, just someone who knows what he's doing/talking about.
#14
lol I learnt my lesson, it was my brothers fault, I bought a backup drive but that night i came he decided to trip over the HD and BANG.
#15
Having also learned my lesson the hard way, I think this is a really good deal. Most computer shops charge at least £50 for the labour. I had to buy all sorts of cables to get data of my defunct computer, and that all totalled up to more than £25! Heat added :)
#16
williamj1
Having also learned my lesson the hard way, I think this is a really good deal. Most computer shops charge at least £50 for the labour. I had to buy all sorts of cables to get data of my defunct computer, and that all totalled up to more than £25! Heat added :)


No offence, but for me 'learning your lesson' would mean implementing a proper backup either locally and/or remotely. Not paying £25 for a service you may not use, and if you do so has no guarantee of actually working.
#17
williamj1
Having also learned my lesson the hard way, I think this is a really good deal. Most computer shops charge at least £50 for the labour. I had to buy all sorts of cables to get data of my defunct computer, and that all totalled up to more than £25! Heat added :)


Most computer shops don't physically fix/repair physical hard drive problems, if they did it would cost more than £50. They simply use open source data recovery software, which anyone can download (at work, a friends house, internet cafe and so on) and boot from CD/USB to recover what they can from the drive. Have you learned any lesson? A sensible backup regime would negate the need for this £25 service.

Edited By: arduino on Feb 03, 2011 11:20
#18
arduino
shaz2sxy
this will also save data from a dead HD i.e. if motor or heads have seazed. good price considering it cost me £1000 to get 1tb of data back from Seagate a couple of years back
You mean you didn't have a backup? Expensive lesson learned I hope.

Oh for the gift of hindsight.

A man who never made a mistake never made anything worthwhile.
#19
arduino


Most computer shops don't physically fix/repair physical hard drive problems, if they did it would cost more than £50. They simply use open source data recovery software, which anyone can download (at work, a friends house, internet cafe and so on) and boot from CD/USB to recover what they can from the drive.


And they only work if the fault is caused by a software error e.g. a corrupted MBR. If there is a physical fault (e.g. broken read head) software approaches won't work. They actually have to take the drive apart, remove the platters and insert them into a second IDENTICAL drive and see if the info is still there. This costs hundreds and usually has a less than 50% chance of working.

I can assure you that this level of recovery is not covered by Freecom's offer anyway.
#20
I'm not thinking about this for techy people who can go and "simply use open source data recovery software, which anyone can download". The number of people who firstly, wouldn't know how to do a backup, and secondly wouldn't have a clue how to recover it is huge. Therefore, for them, I think this is a good deal :)
#21
williamj1
I'm not thinking about this for techy people who can go and "simply use open source data recovery software, which anyone can download". The number of people who firstly, wouldn't know how to do a backup, and secondly wouldn't have a clue how to recover it is huge. Therefore, for them, I think this is a good deal :)


These days I don't think downloading something from the internet and burning it to CD is beyond the capabilities of most people. Since people seem to have no problem doing very similar things (burning audio cds, video DVDs..). If people don't know how to do a backup, they could google it. Nobody is born knowing how to do this, it's simply taking responsability for yourself and your data. Even the windows XP built in help has easy to follow information on backing things up and restoring them. IIRC it's even included on the 'tour' of windows XP.

Since anything freecom are offering is purely software based (they're not going to go track down an identical disk, swap out a failed onboard controller of fix physical platters), and people would have the same change of doing so themselves if they invedted an hour reading how to do it. IMHO the deal is cold for those reasons.
#22
Kafkaesque
arduino


Most computer shops don't physically fix/repair physical hard drive problems, if they did it would cost more than £50. They simply use open source data recovery software, which anyone can download (at work, a friends house, internet cafe and so on) and boot from CD/USB to recover what they can from the drive.


And they only work if the fault is caused by a software error e.g. a corrupted MBR. If there is a physical fault (e.g. broken read head) software approaches won't work. They actually have to take the drive apart, remove the platters and insert them into a second IDENTICAL drive and see if the info is still there. This costs hundreds and usually has a less than 50% chance of working.

I can assure you that this level of recovery is not covered by Freecom's offer anyway.


I agree 100%, this is a £25 tax on the lazy :P
1 Like #23
Yep, this deal is great for giving non-techy people a false sense of security that will be dashed when Freecom shrugs their shoulders, tells you your data is unrecoverable, and points you at the small print that states that there is no guarantee they will recover your data.

Back up.

For example Carbonite will cost you about £30 a year assuming a 3 year contract. It's designed for people who are not technical and runs transparently once set up. There are other benefits related to remote access and recovery of deleted/overwritten files too.
#24
Kafkaesque
williamj1
Having also learned my lesson the hard way, I think this is a really good deal. Most computer shops charge at least £50 for the labour. I had to buy all sorts of cables to get data of my defunct computer, and that all totalled up to more than £25! Heat added :)

No offence, but for me 'learning your lesson' would mean implementing a proper backup either locally and/or remotely. Not paying £25 for a service you may not use, and if you do so has no guarantee of actually working.

I have so many hard drives with back up files as well as my ClickFree © back up system but let's say you go abroad taking your laptop and Camera with you, and you save the images from your camera to your laptop each day. .. and the laptop crashes and you can't recover your images then you have a problem.. . I know that hard drive a very cheap now, but I remember when hard drives cost more than £100 and less than 500kb yes FIVE HUNDRED KB's and cameras (digital) cost over £700 for a .75mxp and took less than 17 images on to a build in flash card . . and of course back-up hard drives can fail also
#25
Kafkaesque
Yep, this deal is great for giving non-techy people a false sense of security that will be dashed when Freecom shrugs their shoulders, tells you your data is unrecoverable, and points you at the small print that states that there is no guarantee they will recover your data.

Back up.

For example Carbonite will cost you about £30 a year assuming a 3 year contract. It's designed for people who are not technical and runs transparently once set up. There are other benefits related to remote access and recovery of deleted/overwritten files too.


Indeed, and the last thing you should be doing with a damaged disk is sticking it in the post :P
#26
arduino
Since anything freecom are offering is purely software based (they're not going to go track down an identical disk, swap out a failed onboard controller of fix physical platters), and people would have the same change of doing so themselves if they invedted an hour reading how to do it. IMHO the deal is cold for those reasons.


Kafkaesque
And they only work if the fault is caused by a software error e.g. a corrupted MBR. If there is a physical fault (e.g. broken read head) software approaches won't work. They actually have to take the drive apart, remove the platters and insert them into a second IDENTICAL drive and see if the info is still there. This costs hundreds and usually has a less than 50% chance of working.

I can assure you that this level of recovery is not covered by Freecom's offer anyway.


OK guys - you have both made very bold claims there. Time for you to back them up!!!
#27
jakethecat
arduino
Since anything freecom are offering is purely software based (they're not going to go track down an identical disk, swap out a failed onboard controller of fix physical platters), and people would have the same change of doing so themselves if they invedted an hour reading how to do it. IMHO the deal is cold for those reasons.


Kafkaesque
And they only work if the fault is caused by a software error e.g. a corrupted MBR. If there is a physical fault (e.g. broken read head) software approaches won't work. They actually have to take the drive apart, remove the platters and insert them into a second IDENTICAL drive and see if the info is still there. This costs hundreds and usually has a less than 50% chance of working.

I can assure you that this level of recovery is not covered by Freecom's offer anyway.


OK guys - you have both made very bold claims there. Time for you to back them up!!!


http://shop.freecom.com/store/freecom/en_IE/pd/productID.220042500/categoryId.52245300


How it works: 1) Purchase the Data Recovery Service package 2) Register your hard drive online at http://www.freecom.com/datarecovery 3) In case your hard drive crashes contact us online or via our local Service Centers 4) Send the drive to our laboratory free of charge, using our shipping label 5) Our technicians will send you a diagnostic report, including a list of recoverable files 6) Our laboratory will recover your data and send the recovered data back

There is always a possibility that your computer’s hard drive or your external hard drive may crash. A hard drive crash would mean that you lose all data that is stored on that drive. Imagine your digital photos, your music or video collection, your important documents. All gone!

With our Data Recovery Service/Anti Datastrophe Systema hard drive crash is not the end of the world. Even if your computer does not recognize the hard drive anymore, the data usually is still present on the drive and thereby might still be recoverable in our laboratory.

Registering for our Data Recovery Service means a safe feeling for you. For a period of 3 years, you have the right to one data recovery of your hard drive in case it has crashed.


Starting with step 4, idiocy, if it's damaged you don't want to be sending it anywhere.
Step 5 is automatically generated by every data recovery software, I'm sure they'd have the decency to add a freecom logo at the top. Step 6 send you back the files, cheers guv.

If you understand how a hard drive works, how data is stored you'd know how to get data back from "unreadable disks". Why reinvent the wheel by rewriting and testing the algorythms again when there are time proven open source solutions available. This make no sense from a financial standpoint for freecom.

Their details are intentionally vague, they don't say anywhere they'll attempt to physically fix a disk.

This is obvious marketing to make people afraid and pay for something that may get some of their data back.

You may never have experienced a hard disk drive crash. But ask around... anyone who has ever experienced this will tell you that it almost feels as if the world has stopped turning. In a split second all files, information, documents, photos you have created through the years are gone! Most of them are irreplaceable! Now you can limit the chance of indefinitely losing your data. The data on a crashed hard disk drive is often rescuable. Why take the chance? Protect the data on your computer’s hard disk drive or your external hard drive. Think of it as an additional warranty or an insurance. It’s better to be safe than sorry!


Typical scaremongering.

For them to physicall fix a physically damaged disk, say a typical case a failed onboard controller, they'd need:

An identical drive which compontents could be used from, with matching controller chips, flashed with matching firmware for every drive you could possibly buy. Note over time the firmware and controller chips can change on the same make and model of drive as production levels and software change. They'd also need to get these before they go off the market.

They'd need one of them for each customer they'd be supporting, matching exactly the drive (chipset and firmware as mentioned above) owned by said customer.

Clearly, this isn't going to happen. But hey, what do I know, I'm not trying to make a qucik buck out of people by getting their hopes up, I'd rather they backed stuff up properly so they'd never need such a risky (potentially they'll get nothing back) service.


Edited By: arduino on Feb 03, 2011 12:16
#28
I think between hard disk backup, RAID 1, DVD-R and unlimited free online storage you have pretty much covered all the angles.

Touch wood never had a hard disk die on me in over 20 years worth of use so not likely to be of use to me.
#29
jakethecat


OK guys - you have both made very bold claims there. Time for you to back them up!!!


Well, actually I think the onus is on the company providing the service, and Freecom is vague to the point of just saying the Pixel Fairies will recover your data with absolutely no details about the service they will provide. Also if you click on the link provided to register your HD it just redirects you to their main page.

I actually don't think it's a scam, but it isn't a replacement for a proper backup and there is a danger people will think it is (especially the 'non-techy' people this product is aimed at). And if you are backing up properly this service is just superfluous.
#30
Kafkaesque
jakethecat


OK guys - you have both made very bold claims there. Time for you to back them up!!!


Well, actually I think the onus is on the company providing the service, and Freecom is vague to the point of just saying the Pixel Fairies will recover your data with absolutely no details about the service they will provide. Also if you click on the link provided to register your HD it just redirects you to their main page.

I actually don't think it's a scam, but it isn't a replacement for a proper backup and there is a danger people will think it is (especially the 'non-techy' people this product is aimed at). And if you are backing up properly this service is just superfluous.


Given that their site says:
Registering for our Data Recovery Service means a safe feeling for you. For a period of 3 years, you have the right to one data recovery of your hard drive in case it has crashed.


I get the feeling they're selling the illusion of "safety", don't worry about it, until it goes wrong. Then they have as much chance of getting anything back as a normal punter who'd taken an hour to learn about the tools in question. No small print available, sparse techical details.

We're in agreement, if you back things up properly (it's not hard kids) this service is utterly useless, it may turn out to be utterly useless also since they may not be able to recover anything from a damaged drive.
#31
arduino
jakethecat
arduino
Since anything freecom are offering is purely software based (they're not going to go track down an identical disk, swap out a failed onboard controller of fix physical platters), and people would have the same change of doing so themselves if they invedted an hour reading how to do it. IMHO the deal is cold for those reasons.


Kafkaesque
And they only work if the fault is caused by a software error e.g. a corrupted MBR. If there is a physical fault (e.g. broken read head) software approaches won't work. They actually have to take the drive apart, remove the platters and insert them into a second IDENTICAL drive and see if the info is still there. This costs hundreds and usually has a less than 50% chance of working.

I can assure you that this level of recovery is not covered by Freecom's offer anyway.


OK guys - you have both made very bold claims there. Time for you to back them up!!!


http://shop.freecom.com/store/freecom/en_IE/pd/productID.220042500/categoryId.52245300


How it works: 1) Purchase the Data Recovery Service package 2) Register your hard drive online at http://www.freecom.com/datarecovery 3) In case your hard drive crashes contact us online or via our local Service Centers 4) Send the drive to our laboratory free of charge, using our shipping label 5) Our technicians will send you a diagnostic report, including a list of recoverable files 6) Our laboratory will recover your data and send the recovered data back

There is always a possibility that your computer’s hard drive or your external hard drive may crash. A hard drive crash would mean that you lose all data that is stored on that drive. Imagine your digital photos, your music or video collection, your important documents. All gone!

With our Data Recovery Service/Anti Datastrophe Systema hard drive crash is not the end of the world. Even if your computer does not recognize the hard drive anymore, the data usually is still present on the drive and thereby might still be recoverable in our laboratory.

Registering for our Data Recovery Service means a safe feeling for you. For a period of 3 years, you have the right to one data recovery of your hard drive in case it has crashed.


Starting with step 4, idiocy, if it's damaged you don't want to be sending it anywhere.
Step 5 is automatically generated by every data recovery software, I'm sure they'd have the decency to add a freecom logo at the top. Step 6 send you back the files, cheers guv.

If you understand how a hard drive works, how data is stored you'd know how to get data back from "unreadable disks". Why reinvent the wheel by rewriting and testing the algorythms again when there are time proven open source solutions available. This make no sense from a financial standpoint for freecom.

Their details are intentionally vague, they don't say anywhere they'll attempt to physically fix a disk.

This is obvious marketing to make people afraid and pay for something that may get some of their data back.

You may never have experienced a hard disk drive crash. But ask around... anyone who has ever experienced this will tell you that it almost feels as if the world has stopped turning. In a split second all files, information, documents, photos you have created through the years are gone! Most of them are irreplaceable! Now you can limit the chance of indefinitely losing your data. The data on a crashed hard disk drive is often rescuable. Why take the chance? Protect the data on your computer’s hard disk drive or your external hard drive. Think of it as an additional warranty or an insurance. It’s better to be safe than sorry!


Typical scaremongering.

For them to physicall fix a physically damaged disk, say a typical case a failed onboard controller, they'd need:

An identical drive which compontents could be used from, with matching controller chips, flashed with matching firmware for every drive you could possibly buy. Note over time the firmware and controller chips can change on the same make and model of drive as production levels and software change. They'd also need to get these before they go off the market.

They'd need one of them for each customer they'd be supporting, matching exactly the drive (chipset and firmware as mentioned above) owned by said customer.

Clearly, this isn't going to happen. But hey, what do I know, I'm not trying to make a qucik buck out of people by getting their hopes up, I'd rather they backed stuff up properly so they'd never need such a risky (potentially they'll get nothing back) service.



OK - everyone is entitled to an opinion. But you have no evidence to support your opinion and everything you say is based on your own assumptions of what Freecom may/may not do. Think I've got it now...

A couple of little questions for you: -
(1) if you have a failed drive and you want a data recovery service (not just this one - any of the professional services out there) to look at it - how are they supposed to get it unless you ship the drive to them?

(2) have you ever worked for or with a data recovery service and seen what equipment they have available to them to recover data from a hard drive that has suffered hardware failure?

Don't get me wrong, backups win every time but for every person that does take a backup, there will be 25 that don't.

If you go to any data recovery specialist, the price for a laptop/desktop hdd is around the £300-£500 mark. All Freecom are offering is a low cost insurance policy for a service that might be needed. Their business model will be based around the fact that 95%+ of customers will never need the service and that 95%+ cover the costs involved for a full data recover service for the few that need it with some profit margin in there as well.
#32
jakethecat

OK - everyone is entitled to an opinion. But you have no evidence to support your opinion and everything you say is based on your own assumptions of what Freecom may/may not do. Think I've got it now...

A couple of little questions for you: -
(1) if you have a failed drive and you want a data recovery service (not just this one - any of the professional services out there) to look at it - how are they supposed to get it unless you ship the drive to them?

(2) have you ever worked for or with a data recovery service and seen what equipment they have available to them to recover data from a hard drive that has suffered hardware failure?

Don't get me wrong, backups win every time but for every person that does take a backup, there will be 25 that don't.

If you go to any data recovery specialist, the price for a laptop/desktop hdd is around the £300-£500 mark. All Freecom are offering is a low cost insurance policy for a service that might be needed. Their business model will be based around the fact that 95%+ of customers will never need the service and that 95%+ cover the costs involved for a full data recover service for the few that need it with some profit margin in there as well.


Obviously you've not "got it". You clearly don't understand my explanation of what would be required to fix a physical hard drive problem, reread my previous post and tell me what you don't understand about what is required, and I'll explain it to you futher. I would have thought that the economy of scale I explained would be sufficent.

To answer your questions:

1) Any data recovery service worth their salt come to where you are, safely remove your drive, put it in a shock proof case (it's actually suspended in a shock proof case) and take it to their lab. Putting anything like this in the post is idiocy.

2) Yes, I have. You seem to find it odd that people know what they're talking about.

Again, you're missing the point, even paying £4K for a SCSI drive to go through an attempt to repair a physical problem, purely to get the data off it, there is no garuntee it will work. This is what business go for when the poop hits the fan. This is why they pay big bucks for it.

This is why they don't do this for your average Joe, it costs ass loads of money.

If you think sending an already damaged disk through the post is a good idea, good luck to you, but you're wrong. I'd have thought anyone would be able to grasp that this can only make a bad situation worse.

The people who really know what they're doing in the data recover industry only support a subset of products (SCSI and server/SAN grade drives because of the cost involved in maintaining, the reliability of the software etc).

There are all sorts of cowboys in the computer/data repair industry, exactly they same as there are cowboy plumbers an electricians.

Your explanation of freecoms business module, albeit speculation (you seem to have an issue when others can logically support their statements, yet have no problem making unfounded specualtions yourself), again proves they can't be doing physical disk repairs, as the money they'd be required to spend on an inventory of harddrives, storage of such and people who actually know what their doing would outweigh the money they're charging.

You also seem to be ignoring the fact that it's trivial to setup a sensible backup regime, negating the need for such a service, which may not even work.



Edited By: arduino on Feb 03, 2011 15:01: fixed typo
1 Like #33
Ok, I'm just procrastinating from work now, but let me try to construct a scenario:

You have a wedding ring which you habitually leave on the edge of the bathroom sink while washing your hands. The plughole is big enough that the ring could fit down it. A plumber would charge you anywhere from £50 to £250 to recover it depending how far down the drain it goes, and there is no guarantee he could retrieve it even after charging you the money.

You have identified the possibility of this happening. Do you

a) Pay your plumber £25 in advance on the vague promise that he'll 'have a go' at recovering your ring in the event it goes down the drain.

b) Pay £30 to fit a drain hole cover that would prevent the ring going down the drain.

For those who are metaphor impaired:

'The ring' is your data
'The ring falling into the sink' is your hard drive crashing
'The Drain hole cover' is a back up plan
'The plumber' is Freecom
#34
you could say the same about any form of insurance. . even AA superscription or extended warranties. . how many have paid and never had to make a claim . and how many who have and have been grateful that they had such cover ??
#35
iscom
you could say the same about any form of insurance. . even AA superscription or extended warranties. . how many have paid and never had to make a claim . and how many who have and have been grateful that they had such cover ??


Sigh, again...

No matter if it's a physically damaged disk or not this is not an insurance policy, you may not get your data back. It's not that difficult to understand. This isn't an extended warranty, they're not offering to replace your data, or take you back to Miami to retake your holiday snaps! I can't understand why people think of this as some sort of viable backup or as you put it insurance. It's simply not comparable to either of those.

If you want to be able to get your data back, back it up.
1 Like #36
iscom
you could say the same about any form of insurance. . even AA superscription or extended warranties. . how many have paid and never had to make a claim . and how many who have and have been grateful that they had such cover ??


You can't say the same. You are not getting the fundamental difference between data and a physical object.

A backup plan means you have duplicated your data, it is in essence 'Backed Up' (Feel free to use 'Air quotes')

You can now take your laptop and say (imagination fails me...) run it over with a bulldozer. You will still have all your precious photos and porn.

Alternatively you can go with Freecom and post your hard drive (now the size of an A4 sheet and 2mm thick...) and see how well they do at getting your data back for you.

To use your insurance analogy:

Your car is stolen, you go to your insurer Freecom and they say "No problem, we'll have a look around the place and if we find your car we'll send it right back to you... Nope, can't see it anywhere... Oh well"
1 Like #37
HDs are cheap. Keep at least two backups and keep them in different places for extra security. Encrypt backups too in case of loss or theft. That way your data remains safe. Even the experts cannot always recover badly damaged disks. They can't do anything if it is stolen. Much better to back up and look after your own stuff. No need for this service.
#38
A bit off the point with regards to this actual deal.

Stupidly, I delayed buying a back up hard disk for so long that my HDD went kaput before I backed it up. I'm told my motherboard as well as the HDD has gone. The computer will start but will not load windows and can not find the HDD.

Can this HDD be salvaged? how? and will freecom cover this? Also how can you be sure that the data will not be kept or redistributed?
#39
Hunter1985 - Feb 04, 2011 21:50
A bit off the point with regards to this actual deal.

Stupidly, I delayed buying a back up hard disk for so long that my HDD went kaput before I backed it up. I'm told my motherboard as well as the HDD has gone. The computer will start but will not load windows and can not find the HDD.

Can this HDD be salvaged? how? and will freecom cover this? Also how can you be sure that the data will not be kept or redistributed?

Try putting your HD in an external enclosure and try connecting it to another computer. If it works then whoopee but, if not, all may not be lost. Decent data recovery software can salvage a lot, sometimes everything as long as the HD is not too damaged. I use a Mac so I don't know what is available for a PC but, Data Rescue II on a Mac is the best recovery software that I have come across. It can rescue data from a PC disk too. I have used it fairly successfully for several friends who have neglected to backup their PCs.

It is unlikely that your data would be kept or redistributed but there are no guarantees of that. That is why I keep all of my backups encrypted. This is something that the government, councils and, businesses should have learned to do long ago.
#40
Hunter1985
A bit off the point with regards to this actual deal.

Stupidly, I delayed buying a back up hard disk for so long that my HDD went kaput before I backed it up. I'm told my motherboard as well as the HDD has gone. The computer will start but will not load windows and can not find the HDD.

Can this HDD be salvaged? how? and will freecom cover this? Also how can you be sure that the data will not be kept or redistributed?


Regarding the freecom offer, please read and understand the previous comments. You're right, you have no way to tell what they do with your data once they have it. This is actually quite common practice. See here.

Are you sure both the power and the data cables are connected properly?

Boot from a linux CD (try Trinity or Ubuntu). This will boot your 'damaged' drive in read only mode, which is what you want when the integrity of the device is in question. You could either then backup your data to a USB drive or to another machine on your network (i.e. connected to your router).

If you are new to linux Ubuntu will be easier to use. Again, read and understand that copying your data to an external hard drive, and storing it in the same place isn't really a backup policy. What if your house burned down?

If you have any questions you're welcome to PM me.

Cheers

Edited By: arduino on Feb 05, 2011 09:39: .

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