Harry Potter 1-5 Blu Ray Collection £39.99 @ HMV + Quidco [£37.99 After Quidco] - HotUKDeals
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HARRY POTTER AND THE PHILOSOPHER'S STONE charts the young wizard's induction at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry; in HARRY POTTER AND THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS Harry is in his second year at the school, and already battling the dark forces that threaten to destroy Hogwarts; the adventure continues with HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN, where Harry and his friends must defeat a dangerous convict who has escaped from Azkaban Prison and is said to be headed towards Hogwarts. The fourth instalment of the franchise, HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE, is decidedly darker in tone, with Harry facing a plot to assassinate him during the Tri Wizard festival. In HARRY POTTER AND THE ORDER OF THE PHOENIX, our hero experiences a bout of teenage angst while defending Hogwarts from a strange prophecy...
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7y, 7m agoFound 7 years, 7 months ago
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#1
Pretty much the same price at Amazon and The Hut, but seems a good price for these on blu ray.
#2
Niafromwales
Pretty much the same price at Amazon and The Hut, but seems a good price for these on blu ray.


Yeah amazon & hmv have just reduced this in price (can't even find it at the hut :thinking:). I choose to highlight hmv because of quidco, quicker shipping & cardboard sleeve's for protection. :)
#3
[QUOTE=adsldave](can't even find it at the hut :thinking:).

That would be because I'm telling lies :oops:
The DVD box set is £39.29 at The Hut. Makes this seem even better!! :-D
banned#4
Do the Mcdonalds codes still work?
banned#5
Conscept
Do the Mcdonalds codes still work?


nah those ended last month!!

If i hadnt just got them all on hd id have probably snapped this up, with student discount its only £36 which is brilliant for 5 films!

Plus as mentioned at least generally hmv are very good at packing boxsets (as they shrink wrap them to the cardboard so they dont bash about!)
banned#6
JustifiedAncient
nah those ended last month!!

If i hadnt just got them all on hd id have probably snapped this up, with student discount its only £36 which is brilliant for 5 films!

Plus as mentioned at least generally hmv are very good at packing boxsets (as they shrink wrap them to the cardboard so they dont bash about!)


Yeah, I have student dis aswell.
Thing is.
It's all packaged up for 5 blurays. But there is more films to come out and it will look daft having the others seperate. Unless I buy them all seperate..

Then again I could just pull out of the box haha
#7
Conscept
Yeah, I have student dis aswell.
Thing is.
It's all packaged up for 5 blurays. But there is more films to come out and it will look daft having the others seperate. Unless I buy them all seperate..

Then again I could just pull out of the box haha


yeah - same applies for James Bond releases :thumbsup:

don't see why anyone would buy an incomplete set? :?
#8
Hot. :thumbsup:
#9
toonarmani
yeah - same applies for James Bond releases :thumbsup:

don't see why anyone would buy an incomplete set? :?


Absolutely - it's no secret there will be another three films, so might as well hold out until they release the entire boxset.
#10
Xb0xGuru
Absolutely - it's no secret there will be another three films, so might as well hold out until they release the entire boxset.


By the time they've made the next three films, BluRay will be soooooo last year.
Same with the Bond ones. It's just a question of when you jump in.

I'm waiting for Battlestar Galactica complete.
#11
londislagerhound
By the time they've made the next three films, BluRay will be soooooo last year.


The DVD format is 12 years old this year and still going strong. I really can't see Blu ray being a defunct format in half of this time. It'll take a vast majority of the population to move to Blu ray in the next 5 years, let alone it being a superceded format.
#12
Xb0xGuru
The DVD format is 12 years old this year and still going strong. I really can't see Blu ray being a defunct format in half of this time. It'll take a vast majority of the population to move to Blu ray in the next 5 years, let alone it being a superceded format.


I want to buy a standalone Blu-ray player and the Panny one is seriously tempting me but I simply wont pay this kind of money for the discs and the excuse that you pay 'a premium' for new technology is wearing thin now since the format is almost 3 years old yet the cost of the discs has remained prohibitive.

The fact of the matter is that the movie companies are ripping the **** out of the public with Blu-ray with ridiculously high prices for the discs and for that reason alone you wont get a massive scale adoption to Blu-ray. Qualitywise movies might be better to look at on Blu-ray but a crap movie is a crap movie whether its on Betamax, VHS, Laserdisc, DVD, HD DVD or Blu-ray no amount of bells and whistles will ever change that fact.
#13
Ev0lution
I want to buy a standalone Blu-ray player and the Panny one is seriously tempting me but I simply wont pay this kind of money for the discs and the excuse that you pay 'a premium' for new technology is wearing thin now since the format is almost 3 years old yet the cost of the discs has remained prohibitive.

The fact of the matter is that the movie companies are ripping the **** out of the public with Blu-ray with ridiculously high prices for the discs and for that reason alone you wont get a massive scale adoption to Blu-ray. Qualitywise movies might be better to look at on Blu-ray but a crap movie is a crap movie whether its on Betamax, VHS, Laserdisc, DVD, HD DVD or Blu-ray no amount of bells and whistles will ever change that fact.


Absolute nonsense - look at the cost of DVD players and movies in 2000 (3 years into its launch).

Players - you'd be lucky to pick one up for less than £200.
Movies - You were looking at £20 a movie in the high street, with about £15 a movie online.

I joined the DVD revolution in 2001 and paid £180 for my DVD player (on sale - was £220). The cheapest amount I was buying movies for was from dvdboxoffice . com, a Canadian website where if I was happy to wait a fortnight for a movie, I could get for about £12.

Don't get me wrong - for the most part, people will be happy with DVD versions of so-so movies as the benefit of moving to HD won't be worth it, but this has nothing to do with the pricing of movies or players and everything to do with movie itself.
#14
Xb0xGuru
Absolute nonsense - look at the cost of DVD players and movies in 2000 (3 years into its launch).

Players - you'd be lucky to pick one up for less than £200.
Movies - You were looking at £20 a movie in the high street, with about £15 a movie online.

I joined the DVD revolution in 2001 and paid £180 for my DVD player (on sale - was £220). The cheapest amount I was buying movies for was from dvdboxoffice . com, a Canadian website where if I was happy to wait a fortnight for a movie, I could get for about £12.

Don't get me wrong - for the most part, people will be happy with DVD versions of so-so movies as the benefit of moving to HD won't be worth it, but this has nothing to do with the pricing of movies or players and everything to do with movie itself.


The major difference of DVD vs Blu-Ray compared to DVD vs VHS was that there was a major, major revolutionary difference in the quality of the product and the features that DVD offered over VHS so that somewhat justified the extra cost.

The equivalent jump from DVD to Blu-Ray is nowhere near as much, more of an evolution than a revolution and people are finding it much harder to part with the cash this time. VHS was a dead 20 year old format in its last throes and couldnt go any further when DVD came along. The same argument cannot be used for DVD, if anything its getting stronger as companies are finding more and more ways of increasing the disc size so that more features can be added.
#15
Ev0lution
The major difference of DVD vs Blu-Ray compared to DVD vs VHS was that there was a major, major revolutionary difference in the quality of the product and the features that DVD offered over VHS so that somewhat justified the extra cost.

The equivalent jump from DVD to Blu-Ray is nowhere near as much, more of an evolution than a revolution and people are finding it much harder to part with the cash this time. VHS was a dead 20 year old format in its last throes and couldnt go any further when DVD came along. The same argument cannot be used for DVD, if anything its getting stronger as companies are finding more and more ways of increasing the disc size so that more features can be added.


It depends on how you look at it.

The jump from analog to digital was always going to be major, let there be no doubt about it.

The issue is that DVD-Video is restricted to standard definition, MPEG-2 content purely because of the limitation of space on a DVD9 disc and the encoding agreed by the DVD alliance.

I've no idea where you're getting the idea that DVD can be increased - it has a limit of 2 layers per side (8.5GB).

For many, the jump from SD to HD is just as big. Those who have good quality TVs and sound systems are really benefitting from Blu-ray - the ability to watch movies in 1080p/24 and listen to them in 7.1 HD Audio absolutely blows away DVD in terms of quality.

Look at where DVD was back in 2000 - HMV had a tiny area dedicated to it (about the same as they had for Laserdisc), while the rest of the video section of the store was VHS. Yes, DVD looked great on your CRT telly, but herein lies the problem. We're slowly adopting HD as the standard. It's taking far longer than the switch from VHS to DVD, purely because we need to upgrade more of our hardware to enjoy it fully. Those who have perfectly working CRTs will have no interest in HD until such a time comes when their ol' faithful dies out and they're in the position to purchase another set. Therefore, the reluctance to part with their cash is more to do with the need of upgrading more than just the player.
#16
Xb0xGuru
The jump from analog to digital was always going to be major, let there be no doubt about it.


But it was relatively seamless because you didnt require a hardware upgrade.

Xb0xGuru
I've no idea where you're getting the idea that DVD can be increased - it has a limit of 2 layers per side (8.5GB).


Im pretty sure I have read about 18GB DVDs.

Xb0xGuru
For many, the jump from SD to HD is just as big. Those who have good quality TVs and sound systems are really benefitting from Blu-ray - the ability to watch movies in 1080p/24 and listen to them in 7.1 HD Audio absolutely blows away DVD in terms of quality.


As for the technology jump you are never, ever going to get mass penetration of Blu-ray if you need to spend hundreds if not thousands on an AV Setup. It will always be confined to hobbyists or serious technophiles, they are not massmarket and never will be.

A DVD can be bought in Lidl for as little as a tenner and plugged into a 14" Alba and watched by anyone and they can buy 6 DVDs for £20 which is the price of 1 new Blu-Ray in most cases.

I am not doubting Blu-ray's qualities for a second just the ability of the format to ever manage to adopt the average Joe in time to make a significant market share for itself.
#17
Ev0lution
But it was relatively seamless because you didnt require a hardware upgrade.


Except for the DVD player itself, which at launch was about £200 to £300. Not forgetting if you wanted to benefit from DD 5.1 Audio, you would have needed a surround system which could handle this. You also had to repurchase all your movies in DVD format (which at launch were £20-25 each).

Ev0lution

Im pretty sure I have read about 18GB DVDs.


Yes, if you have a DSDL (Double sided, dual layer) DVDs (which are exremely rare), you can fit almost 18GB on one disc.


Ev0lution
As for the technology jump you are never, ever going to get mass penetration of Blu-ray if you need to spend hundreds if not thousands on an AV Setup. It will always be confined to hobbyists or serious technophiles, they are not massmarket and never will be.


I'm sure the same was said for DVD when it was first released.

Ev0lution
A DVD can be bought in Lidl for as little as a tenner and plugged into a 14" Alba and watched by anyone and they can buy 6 DVDs for £20 which is the price of 1 new Blu-Ray in most cases.


Anyone with a 14" TV is not going to benefit from HD full stop, so it's a nullified argument as with the price comparison, when I'd already stated that in 2001 DVDs were (and still are in certain high street shops) around the £20 mark. The only reason you can get real cheap DVDs now is because the R&D and production costs have already been paid for by the early adopters. This is how new technology evolves. It happened with DVD and it'll happen with Blu-ray.

Ev0lution

I am not doubting Blu-ray's qualities for a second just the ability of the format to ever manage to adopt the average Joe in time to make a significant market share for itself.


It doesn't need to do anything in a hurry - it's the only disc-based HD format out there and is already gaining a good market share (probably not as better as DVD vs VHS after 3 years, but still respectable). As HDTV prices tumble, so will the price of Blu-ray players. More are sold and the price comes down as the R&D is paid for. For a totally new format, 3 years is nothing. It's a quarter of the life of DVD and look what's been achieved in the last 3 years there!
#18
Xb0xGuru
It doesn't need to do anything in a hurry - it's the only disc-based HD format out there and is already gaining a good market share (probably not as better as DVD vs VHS after 3 years, but still respectable). As HDTV prices tumble, so will the price of Blu-ray players. More are sold and the price comes down as the R&D is paid for. For a totally new format, 3 years is nothing. It's a quarter of the life of DVD and look what's been achieved in the last 3 years there!


It hasnt achieved anything special at all. The sales of Blu-ray hardware are skewed dramatically by the PS3 giving it a far higher market share than it would have normally had. A smart move by Sony but not enough to think its going to all of a sudden shoot into the stratosphere sales wise.

Your simply cannot project that the Blu-ray format will automatically become as popular as DVD. It doesnt have anywhere near as many marketing features or market conditions in its favour as DVD had.
#19
Ev0lution
It hasnt achieved anything special at all. The sales of Blu-ray hardware are skewed dramatically by the PS3 giving it a far higher market share than it would have normally had. A smart move by Sony but not enough to think its going to all of a sudden shoot into the stratosphere sales wise.

Your simply cannot project that the Blu-ray format will automatically become as popular as DVD. It doesnt have anywhere near as many marketing features or market conditions in its favour as DVD had.


You're also forgetting that for the first 2 years it was in a format war with HD-DVD. Not only did it sell incredibly well in these two years for a HD format in an already saturated DVD market (approx 50% of what DVD managed in the first two years), but also under intense competition. DVD had NO competition because there was nothing like it in the market.

I don't think the PS3 sales are skewing the figures anywhere near as much as you think they do - I personally bought a PS3 for Blu-ray playback. I'm sure others have done likewise.

In the same way I cannot project that Blu-ray will be as popular, you can't say it won't! It's another nullified, pointless argument. I can say it's looking promising tho - you ought to check out the wiki page.

for instance:

According to Adams Media Research, high-definition software sales were slower in the first two years than standard DVD software sales.[43] 16.3 million standard DVD software units were sold in the first two years (1997-1998) compared to 8.3 million high-definition software units (2006-2007).[43][44] One reason given for this difference was the smaller marketplace (26.5 million HDTVs in 2007 compared to 100 million SDTVs in 1998).


So after two years, DVD only penetrated 16% of the market whereas Blu-ray managed just under 32% (double), if you take it as red that those buying Blu-ray players are using HDTVs. Again, taking into account that they were losing a certain amount of sales to HD-DVD, it's nigh-on impressive.

The market is ripe for a HD Movie solution and whether you like it or not, Blu-ray ticks all the boxes. As the takeup for HDTV increases, the demand for Blu-ray will increase with it.

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