Hisense 55M7000 4K ULED HDR 4K Ultra HD Smart TV, 55" With Freeview HD & Ultra Slim Design £699 @ John Lewis with 5yr guarantee! - HotUKDeals
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Hisense 55M7000 4K ULED HDR 4K Ultra HD Smart TV, 55" With Freeview HD & Ultra Slim Design £699 @ John Lewis with 5yr guarantee! £699.99

£699.99 @ John Lewis
55" 4K ULED TV for under £700 with a 5 yr guarantee thrown in from John Lewis. Damn. I want this. I can't have it though. Maybe others can? "Bring the brilliance of full-colour HDR to your livin… Read More
groakybaby Avatar
6m, 2w agoFound 6 months, 2 weeks ago
55" 4K ULED TV for under £700 with a 5 yr guarantee thrown in from John Lewis.

Damn. I want this. I can't have it though. Maybe others can?

"Bring the brilliance of full-colour HDR to your living room with Hisense’s stunning set. Mingling pin-sharp 4K, vivid 10-bit colour and the brand’s innovative ULED technology, your shows will look remarkable. All of this tech is joined by the app-filled Hisense Smart platform, PVR compatibility and elegant Ultra Slim design. Bright, colourful and cutting-edge, this feature-packed set will the hub of your home entertainment system."
More From John Lewis:
groakybaby Avatar
6m, 2w agoFound 6 months, 2 weeks ago
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(1)
8 Likes
Really don't understand the rush for 4K.

Media just hasn't caught up and the content out there that's worth watching specifically on 4K versus 1080p is hardly exhaustive.

Unless you physically need a new TV my advice is to wait, the technology on display at CES is enough of a step change to warrant the wait, if only to benefit on today's sets at a healthy reduction in the months to come (yes, I know thing will always depreciate). There's some exciting stuff coming this year:

More OLED.
Proper HDR sets with appropriate dimming.
HDR standardisation / Manufacturers supporting the 4 competing HDR and HLG technologies.
And very thin TV's, like this one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7wXsUJrBGCI

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1 Like #1
Same price at RS. Bought one on Saturday. It's a great screen. £50 less at Crompton and Moore though. Try to get JL to price match
1 Like #2
Back up at £689 at C&M now. I price matched at £649 yesterday.
2 Likes #3
courtster
Back up at £689 at C&M now. I price matched at £649 yesterday.

Isn't that only a 2 yr guarantee though? Compared with JL's 5 yr-er
1 Like #4
To buy now or to wait until July /august question. Just when I was trying to convince my brain to buy to the hisense 55m7000 (which I am told is comparable to Sammy ks7000 in picture quality but cheaper), another reason to wait for the release of the MU8700 to get the full benefits of HDR10 (1000 nits ) is making the decision harder and harder. As I am aware the m7000 uses true 10 bits panel only display in 8bits with dithering. I therefore have few questions for you guys if I may:
1. Is HDR 10 bits significantly more superior than 8 bit with dithering and if yes, will the average Joe notice the difference between 10 bits than 8 bits with dithering?
2. Is there many HDR 10 contents available to watch.
3. Is 8bits with dithering just as enjoyable as 10bit or is 10 bits the way forum?
4. Any idea when hisense will release prices for the UK 2017 models?
1 Like #5
danieltruman
Same price at RS. Bought one on Saturday. It's a great screen. £50 less at Crompton and Moore though. Try to get JL to price match
How thin is the TV?
The back which house the components look bulky that may make the TV stick out too much when wall mounted.
#6
ibl0010
danieltruman
Same price at RS. Bought one on Saturday. It's a great screen. £50 less at Crompton and Moore though. Try to get JL to price match
How thin is the TV?
The back which house the components look bulky that may make the TV stick out too much when wall mounted.


Without the stand it's 6cm thick - it was slightly thicker than I thought but I'm not wall mounting
2 Likes #7
Looks good, but going to keep holding for now.

Will add to the shortlist along with the KS7000 incase a deal too good to refuse pops up... :p
#8
groakybaby
courtster
Back up at £689 at C&M now. I price matched at £649 yesterday.
Isn't that only a 2 yr guarantee though? Compared with JL's 5 yr-er
Same price @ RS with 6 yrs...
#9
groakybaby
courtster
Back up at £689 at C&M now. I price matched at £649 yesterday.
Isn't that only a 2 yr guarantee though? Compared with JL's 5 yr-er
I price matched the £649 at C&M with JL and got the 5 years. I was surprised to see them respond on a Sunday. Excellent customer service.
8 Likes #10
Really don't understand the rush for 4K.

Media just hasn't caught up and the content out there that's worth watching specifically on 4K versus 1080p is hardly exhaustive.

Unless you physically need a new TV my advice is to wait, the technology on display at CES is enough of a step change to warrant the wait, if only to benefit on today's sets at a healthy reduction in the months to come (yes, I know thing will always depreciate). There's some exciting stuff coming this year:

More OLED.
Proper HDR sets with appropriate dimming.
HDR standardisation / Manufacturers supporting the 4 competing HDR and HLG technologies.
And very thin TV's, like this one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7wXsUJrBGCI
4 Likes #11
ShroomHeadToad
The_Hoff
Really don't understand the rush for 4K.
Media just hasn't caught up and the content out there that's worth watching specifically on 4K versus 1080p is hardly exhaustive.
Unless you physically need a new TV my advice is to wait, the technology on display at CES is enough of a step change to warrant the wait, if only to benefit on today's sets at a healthy reduction in the months to come (yes, I know thing will always depreciate). There's some exciting stuff coming this year:
More OLED.
Proper HDR sets with appropriate dimming.
HDR standardisation / Manufacturers supporting the 4 competing HDR and HLG technologies.
And very thin TV's, like this one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7wXsUJrBGCI
While I agree the latest 1080p LED screens are inferior to last years model, if you are in the market for a new TV there really isn't much of a choice when every decent screen is 4K, we're being nudged by the manufacturers towards higher cost 4K screens.

That's why I explicitly mentioned if you need (i.e your don't have one, it broke) then 4K makes sense. What I don't see sense in is throwing away a decent 1080P set for a second rate 4K screen, or indeed any 4K screen at the moment. Especially until manufacturers commit to support those devices after the HDR standards are addressed.

Dolby Vision is pretty much the only standard with specific criteria of which they independently certify devices with (the cost of doing so isn't welcome obviously), the others are more akin to a wildwest of conjecture and interpretation with no independent body to police manufacturers labelling their devices as HDR compliant (they might comply with only 1 element only), even Samsung with their Premium label are stretching it with many devices, like the 7000 series, which can only achieve 1000 nits for a few short seconds and doesn't have entirely appropriate dimming to prevent the backlight causing issues in dark scenes.

Most of this is addressed in the next wave of products thankfully as they're less worried about being first to market and more happy to cooperate it seems - only Samsung seem to have said they have no plans to support other HDR standards, whereas Sony, LG, Panasonic have said they plan to adopt all of the standards they're capable of.

Of much more interest to me is HLG which will allow HDR like contrast for live TV, it should be agnostic of device type but I won't be buying in to it until I know I can benefit from HDR for programming supporting it, that's what I watch most of (live TV) and so that's what I value.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/rd/blog/2016-12-bbc-high-dynamic-range-2016
2 Likes #12
I doubt there will be much 4K content on terrestrial or satellite TV even in 3-5 years time, most current SD channels will (hopefully) only get upgraded to 720p or 1080i/p.

Always something better around the corner, in fact it's already here Dell 32" UltraSharp 8K Monitor someone lend me $5K oO



Edited By: ShroomHeadToad on Jan 09, 2017 17:38: link
#13
why hasn't TV prices dropped yet.. CES was announced what 2/3 days ago?
#14
iz123456789
why hasn't TV prices dropped yet.. CES was announced what 2/3 days ago?


I still have John Lewis price matches from 27/12/16 which are still valid for £629.99 and £1029.99 for the 55M7000 and 65M7000, but after seeing the new OLEDs shown at CES I'm going to wait until the 2016 65inch models drop down to more affordable prices.

The way I see it the difference between the 2016 and 2017 models are nearly negligible when compared to any regular LCD.
#15
I want to see how competitive the new Sony OLEDS are. not that I can afford one but more along the lines that LG will be 3rd gen this year and Panasonic 2nd gen.
#16
Has anyone wall mounted this?
Can anyone recommend a decent wall mount that allows the tv to be adjusted at different angles?
#17
danieltruman
ibl0010
danieltruman
Same price at RS. Bought one on Saturday. It's a great screen. £50 less at Crompton and Moore though. Try to get JL to price match
How thin is the TV?
The back which house the components look bulky that may make the TV stick out too much when wall mounted.
Without the stand it's 6cm thick - it was slightly thicker than I thought but I'm not wall mounting
When you say 6cm think, is the the top frame or the button which which has the speaker at the back.
#18
is the HDR on the 55m7000 any good?
1 Like #19
Paid £589 for this TV from AO 2 weeks ago. Just to inform people of potential price for this TV in the near future (hopefully).
2 Likes #20
the new hisense 2017 range and prices in dollars, coming to the UK in march.
http://m.wbtv.com/wbtv/pm_/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=od:1maS7ULY
#21
Pizzle
Paid £589 for this TV from AO 2 weeks ago. Just to inform people of potential price for this TV in the near future (hopefully).
Did you use a code to get it at that price. Is yes, is the code still available.
#22
Have the 65 inch and it is superb with the right firmware updates etc.
#23
woolymammoth8606
the new hisense 2017 range and prices in dollars, coming to the UK in march.
http://m.wbtv.com/wbtv/pm_/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=od:1maS7ULY
I thought the new TV are scheduled to come out in the UK around July / august.
#24
woolymammoth8606
the new hisense 2017 range and prices in dollars, coming to the UK in march.
http://m.wbtv.com/wbtv/pm_/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=od:1maS7ULY
I thought the new TV are scheduled to come out in the UK around July / august.
woolymammoth8606
the new hisense 2017 range and prices in dollars, coming to the UK in march.
http://m.wbtv.com/wbtv/pm_/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=od:1maS7ULY
The prices in that link is for the models that's gonna be released in the us. No prices for the model coming to the UK in that link.
#25
woolymammoth8606
the new hisense 2017 range and prices in dollars, coming to the UK in march.
http://m.wbtv.com/wbtv/pm_/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=od:1maS7ULY
I thought the new TV are scheduled to come out in the UK around July / august.
woolymammoth8606
the new hisense 2017 range and prices in dollars, coming to the UK in march.
http://m.wbtv.com/wbtv/pm_/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=od:1maS7ULY
The prices in that link is for the models that's gonna be released in the us. No prices for the model coming to the UK in that link.
#26
Was all set for a Samsung UE60KS7000 and holding off for a decent price drop but the 65" model of this is getting a lot of praise.

Anyone got one of these running Xbox One S or PS4 Pro and comment on how the HDR stuff fairs?
1 Like #27
clarky666
Was all set for a Samsung UE60KS7000 and holding off for a decent price drop but the 65" model of this is getting a lot of praise.

Anyone got one of these running Xbox One S or PS4 Pro and comment on how the HDR stuff fairs?


This will be nowhere close to the Samsung.
1 Like #28
clarky666
Was all set for a Samsung UE60KS7000 and holding off for a decent price drop but the 65" model of this is getting a lot of praise.
Anyone got one of these running Xbox One S or PS4 Pro and comment on how the HDR stuff fairs?

Tested the Hisense at home for a weekend then bought this KS7000. Would have preferred the LG OLED55B6V but it's twice the price! 4k HDR content was a bit meh on the Hisense, quite washed out. Stunning on the Sammy though and no judder for me.

Really worth checking them out properly if you can.
#29
iz123456789
why hasn't TV prices dropped yet.. CES was announced what 2/3 days ago?

They have all year, Samsung KS7000 was £1500 spring last year. Its about £850 just now.
1 Like #30
http://www.displayspecifications.com/en/model/1beb5f1

The spec on this looks pretty good but don't buy it just because its HDR compatible because the brightness of 380cd/m2 is actually less than some non HDR tv's. Yes it has a 10bit panel (8bit+FRC) so will be able to do good shadow detail but its not going to do the high dynamic range for the simple reason the panel has standard brightness. The hdr picture is not going to compare well to a good example of the Samsung KS7000 which has getting on 3x the brightness.
#31
The_Hoff
Really don't understand the rush for 4K.
Yep. I won't be replacing my 1080p plasma until it breaks or until one of these becomes affordable...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imP4WlXq53Y
1 Like #32
Kind of shameful they are selling an HDR TV with 380cd/m2, but then it's hardly alone... every HDR TV below £1000 is guilty of this, with the one exception being the Samsung KS7000. It's like selling a car that claims to be 'racetrack ready' but when you buy it, you find that it only comes with 3 wheels and has a top speed of 30MPH.
#33
Jams80
Kind of shameful they are selling an HDR TV with 380cd/m2, but then it's hardly alone... every HDR TV below £1000 is guilty of this, with the one exception being the Samsung KS7000. It's like selling a car that claims to be 'racetrack ready' but when you buy it, you find that it only comes with 3 wheels and has a top speed of 30MPH.

Not sure your analogy is correct, it's not that profound. It's manufacturers taking advantage of the confusion they have caused via the lack of agreed standard, naughty indeed.

I'd describe it as buying a track ready car that simply handles like a normal road car, it'll get round but just won't do a great job at it.
1 Like #34
The_Hoff
Jams80
Kind of shameful they are selling an HDR TV with 380cd/m2, but then it's hardly alone... every HDR TV below £1000 is guilty of this, with the one exception being the Samsung KS7000. It's like selling a car that claims to be 'racetrack ready' but when you buy it, you find that it only comes with 3 wheels and has a top speed of 30MPH.
Not sure your analogy is correct, it's not that profound. It's manufacturers taking advantage of the confusion they have caused via the lack of agreed standard, naughty indeed.
I'd describe it as buying a track ready car that simply handles like a normal road car, it'll get round but just won't do a great job at it.

I'd say it's worse than that... most of these sets don't even HALF meet the standards required for HDR. It's not that it doesn't do a good job, it doesn't do it AT ALL! You might as well not have it, you won't notice. What's harder to quantify is how many people are buying in to this nonsense and purchasing for this reason, when they probably already have a set that's just as good, or at the very least are simply unaware they are being lied to. Would they buy it if they knew the truth? I suspect many wouldn't.
#35
Jams80
The_Hoff
Jams80
Kind of shameful they are selling an HDR TV with 380cd/m2, but then it's hardly alone... every HDR TV below £1000 is guilty of this, with the one exception being the Samsung KS7000. It's like selling a car that claims to be 'racetrack ready' but when you buy it, you find that it only comes with 3 wheels and has a top speed of 30MPH.
Not sure your analogy is correct, it's not that profound. It's manufacturers taking advantage of the confusion they have caused via the lack of agreed standard, naughty indeed.
I'd describe it as buying a track ready car that simply handles like a normal road car, it'll get round but just won't do a great job at it.
I'd say it's worse than that... most of these sets don't even HALF meet the standards required for HDR. It's not that it doesn't do a good job, it doesn't do it AT ALL! You might as well not have it, you won't notice. What's harder to quantify is how many people are buying in to this nonsense and purchasing for this reason, when they probably already have a set that's just as good, or at the very least are simply unaware they are being lied to. Would they buy it if they knew the truth? I suspect many wouldn't.

That's also fair, especially in the world of sales commission, Currys and so on i'm sure will be briefing people fully on the limitations of the "HDR" sets the punters are buying.

The power of marketing...
#36
This is actually one of Hisense's brightest panel displays.

Look at this one, its only about half the brightness of standard 4k sets but supports hdr and has a 10bit panel (8bit +FRC)

http://www.displayspecifications.com/en/model/86e1608

http://ao.com/product/he58kec730uwtsd-hisense-tv-silver-37376-108.aspx?&WT.z_PT=AV&WT.z_AT=LED%20TV&WT.z_MT=Search&WT.z_RTM=PLA&WT.z_MAT=Hisense&WT.z_DT=c&WT.z_FT=Free%20Standing&WT.z_PC=HE58KEC730UWTSD&WT.srch=1&wt.z_cn=AV%20-%20LED%20TVs%20-%20SKU&wt.z_ag=product%20code&wt.z_kw=HE58KEC730UWTSD&gclid=Cj0KEQiAqdLDBRDD-b2sv6-i6MsBEiQAkT3wAsk6ZbiFp4KNG_WLqAS5z1bu4cXZb-E3eek9Rx2_2EsaApsr8P8HAQ

It's actually 3D as well using the active 3D standard which means for 3D its even lower brightness. Doesn't mean its not usable and a good tv though. Why can't I call my tv with 400cd/m2, HDR if a tv with half the brightness of mine is claiming it.
#37
bonzobanana
This is actually one of Hisense's brightest panel displays.
Look at this one, its only about half the brightness of standard 4k sets but supports hdr and has a 10bit panel (8bit +FRC)http://www.displayspecifications.com/en/model/86e1608http://ao.com/product/he58kec730uwtsd-hisense-tv-silver-37376-108.aspx?&WT.z_PT=AV&WT.z_AT=LED%20TV&WT.z_MT=Search&WT.z_RTM=PLA&WT.z_MAT=Hisense&WT.z_DT=c&WT.z_FT=Free%20Standing&WT.z_PC=HE58KEC730UWTSD&WT.srch=1&wt.z_cn=AV%20-%20LED%20TVs%20-%20SKU&wt.z_ag=product%20code&wt.z_kw=HE58KEC730UWTSD&gclid=Cj0KEQiAqdLDBRDD-b2sv6-i6MsBEiQAkT3wAsk6ZbiFp4KNG_WLqAS5z1bu4cXZb-E3eek9Rx2_2EsaApsr8P8HAQ
It's actually 3D as well using the active 3D standard which means for 3D its even lower brightness. Doesn't mean its not usable and a good tv though. Why can't I call my tv with 400cd/m2, HDR if a tv with half the brightness of mine is claiming it.

That link only show a brightness of 200 for the k730. The m7000 is 380 I think. Only Panasonic 50dx750b is 5he only tv I have seen with a brightness of just over 500
#38
Jams80
The_Hoff
Jams80
Kind of shameful they are selling an HDR TV with 380cd/m2, but then it's hardly alone... every HDR TV below £1000 is guilty of this, with the one exception being the Samsung KS7000. It's like selling a car that claims to be 'racetrack ready' but when you buy it, you find that it only comes with 3 wheels and has a top speed of 30MPH.
Not sure your analogy is correct, it's not that profound. It's manufacturers taking advantage of the confusion they have caused via the lack of agreed standard, naughty indeed.
I'd describe it as buying a track ready car that simply handles like a normal road car, it'll get round but just won't do a great job at it.
I'd say it's worse than that... most of these sets don't even HALF meet the standards required for HDR. It's not that it doesn't do a good job, it doesn't do it AT ALL! You might as well not have it, you won't notice. What's harder to quantify is how many people are buying in to this nonsense and purchasing for this reason, when they probably already have a set that's just as good, or at the very least are simply unaware they are being lied to. Would they buy it if they knew the truth? I suspect many wouldn't.

Can I ask what advantages or benefits does 10bit panel HDR 1000 nits have over 8bit with dithering?

Am I right in thinking that gamers and films lover are the people that would need HDR 10 bit with 1000 nits. I am sure most people are just average TV viewer and not need full HDR panel or full brightNess to watch eastenders or lose woman.
#39
ibl0010
bonzobanana
This is actually one of Hisense's brightest panel displays.
Look at this one, its only about half the brightness of standard 4k sets but supports hdr and has a 10bit panel (8bit +FRC)http://www.displayspecifications.com/en/model/86e1608http://ao.com/product/he58kec730uwtsd-hisense-tv-silver-37376-108.aspx?&WT.z_PT=AV&WT.z_AT=LED%20TV&WT.z_MT=Search&WT.z_RTM=PLA&WT.z_MAT=Hisense&WT.z_DT=c&WT.z_FT=Free%20Standing&WT.z_PC=HE58KEC730UWTSD&WT.srch=1&wt.z_cn=AV%20-%20LED%20TVs%20-%20SKU&wt.z_ag=product%20code&wt.z_kw=HE58KEC730UWTSD&gclid=Cj0KEQiAqdLDBRDD-b2sv6-i6MsBEiQAkT3wAsk6ZbiFp4KNG_WLqAS5z1bu4cXZb-E3eek9Rx2_2EsaApsr8P8HAQ
It's actually 3D as well using the active 3D standard which means for 3D its even lower brightness. Doesn't mean its not usable and a good tv though. Why can't I call my tv with 400cd/m2, HDR if a tv with half the brightness of mine is claiming it.
That link only show a brightness of 200 for the k730. The m7000 is 380 I think. Only Panasonic 50dx750b is 5he only tv I have seen with a brightness of just over 500

That was my point the tv of this thread has 380 cd/m2 which isn't HDR brightness but some of the other Hisense models are worse for example the 200 cd/m2 model I linked to above. Many of the other Hisense models are between those values. The KS7000 by Samsung is 1000 cd/m2 and I think they are looking at 1500 cd/m2 for the ideal brightness for HDR but 1000 is probably within the range of acceptable brightness.

Need three things for proper HDR

A bright display, and a high contrast ratio 10bit panel that will give you the wide colour gamut with no visible stepping of colours going from deep blacks to natural light brightness.
#40
ibl0010
Jams80
The_Hoff
Jams80
Kind of shameful they are selling an HDR TV with 380cd/m2, but then it's hardly alone... every HDR TV below £1000 is guilty of this, with the one exception being the Samsung KS7000. It's like selling a car that claims to be 'racetrack ready' but when you buy it, you find that it only comes with 3 wheels and has a top speed of 30MPH.
Not sure your analogy is correct, it's not that profound. It's manufacturers taking advantage of the confusion they have caused via the lack of agreed standard, naughty indeed.
I'd describe it as buying a track ready car that simply handles like a normal road car, it'll get round but just won't do a great job at it.
I'd say it's worse than that... most of these sets don't even HALF meet the standards required for HDR. It's not that it doesn't do a good job, it doesn't do it AT ALL! You might as well not have it, you won't notice. What's harder to quantify is how many people are buying in to this nonsense and purchasing for this reason, when they probably already have a set that's just as good, or at the very least are simply unaware they are being lied to. Would they buy it if they knew the truth? I suspect many wouldn't.
Can I ask what advantages or benefits does 10bit panel HDR 1000 nits have over 8bit with dithering?

Am I right in thinking that gamers and films lover are the people that would need HDR 10 bit with 1000 nits. I am sure most people are just average TV viewer and not need full HDR panel or full brightNess to watch eastenders or lose woman.

The dithering part is done by software so its an additional load on the cpu/gpu of the logic board. If your playing a game in game mode such processing can be switched off to reduce input lag however if your playing a game with HDR with 10bit colour then it will still be shown correctly even in game mode on a 10bit panel.

It's only really important for 4k and HDR material and sources. However even lower quality material including standard definition can be upscaled for resolution and feature improved dithering and colour.

Increased brightness makes a more realistic and impressive image which is really the point of 'high dynamic range'.

You don't need it though and sometimes the cutting edge sets have poor reliability. Lot of problems with the KS7000 model from Samsung, many people have issues with them. The less advanced stuff is often less stressful and just works to its lower standard of picture and sound quality.

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