Hisense H55M6600 55" Curved Smart 4K Ultra HD with HDR £699 Amazon - HotUKDeals
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Hisense H55M6600 55" Curved Smart 4K Ultra HD with HDR £699.00 Amazon

£699.00 @ Amazon
Hisense H55M6600 55" Smart 4K Ultra HD with HDR Curved TV for £699 AMAZON 55" Curved 4K UHD Television. With 4 times the resolution of Full HD TV’s, 4K UHD TV can deliver amazing picture quality, a… Read More
kaiser051 Avatar
5m, 4w agoFound 5 months, 4 weeks ago
Hisense H55M6600 55" Smart 4K Ultra HD with HDR Curved TV for £699 AMAZON

55" Curved 4K UHD Television. With 4 times the resolution of Full HD TV’s, 4K UHD TV can deliver amazing picture quality, accurate detail and vibrant colors. Everything you watch looks 4 x sharper than Full HD. 4K UHD makes every pixel come to life and displays the real world like you have never seen before. Become captivated in the breath taking curve of UHD. The ultra slim design makes it a stylish choice. Design meets function with the Hisense H55M6600 Curved 4K TV.
kaiser051 Avatar
5m, 4w agoFound 5 months, 4 weeks ago
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#1
Apoligies if ive missed anything,im stuck in work and posted this via mobile just thought it might appeal to some people as it seems cheaper than elsewhere £799 @ A.O and Ebay before any codes



Edited By: kaiser051 on Oct 30, 2016 09:06: Update
#2
3 Likes #3
"HDR Compatible" whatever that means?

Big Differences in HDR Performance

Unfortunately, though, what we've found so far in our labs is that while some HDR-capable TVs produce super-bright, colorful HDR images, others don’t. How can this be? Well, some televisions have the hardware to really take full advantage of HDR. Others can only read the HDR metadata, which is the information embedded in the digital signal that tells the TV how the image should be displayed. These sets, which are being called "HDR-capable" or "HDR-compatible," then try to accommodate the instructions as best they can, based on the TV's capabilities.

Brightness, for example, is a big challenge. Top-performing TVs with HDR can hit anywhere from 500 to 1,000 nits, the unit used to measure brightness. But some so-called "HDR-compatible" TVs can only produce 100 to 300 nits, so they don't have the headroom to produce the peak levels of brightness required for HDR. As a result, we have some TVs in our labs that use the acronym HDR in their packaging, but that don’t look much different from standard dynamic range sets.

SOURCE: http://www.consumerreports.org/lcd-led-oled-tvs/what-is-an-hdr-tv-and-should-i-get-one/

Edited By: cutthroat_jake on Oct 30, 2016 10:46: Link
#4
cutthroat_jake
"HDR Compatible" whatever that means?Big Differences in HDR Performance
Unfortunately, though, what we've found so far in our labs is that while some HDR-capable TVs produce super-bright, colorful HDR images, others don’t. How can this be? Well, some televisions have the hardware to really take full advantage of HDR. Others can only read the HDR metadata, which is the information embedded in the digital signal that tells the TV how the image should be displayed. These sets, which are being called "HDR-capable" or "HDR-compatible," then try to accommodate the instructions as best they can, based on the TV's capabilities.
Brightness, for example, is a big challenge. Top-performing TVs with HDR can hit anywhere from 500 to 1,000 nits, the unit used to measure brightness. But some so-called "HDR-compatible" TVs can only produce 100 to 300 nits, so they don't have the headroom to produce the peak levels of brightness required for HDR. As a result, we have some TVs in our labs that use the acronym HDR in their packaging, but that don’t look much different from standard dynamic range sets.

SOURCE: http://www.consumerreports.org/lcd-led-oled-tvs/what-is-an-hdr-tv-and-should-i-get-one/
Your right it depends on your budget really i want a 10 bit panel myself but i know il.have to pay double this at least for a 55 inch 10 bit screen its all down to what your willing to spend and what your requirements are

Edited By: kaiser051 on Oct 30, 2016 10:54
#5
kaiser051
cutthroat_jake
"HDR Compatible" whatever that means?Big Differences in HDR Performance
Unfortunately, though, what we've found so far in our labs is that while some HDR-capable TVs produce super-bright, colorful HDR images, others don’t. How can this be? Well, some televisions have the hardware to really take full advantage of HDR. Others can only read the HDR metadata, which is the information embedded in the digital signal that tells the TV how the image should be displayed. These sets, which are being called "HDR-capable" or "HDR-compatible," then try to accommodate the instructions as best they can, based on the TV's capabilities.
Brightness, for example, is a big challenge. Top-performing TVs with HDR can hit anywhere from 500 to 1,000 nits, the unit used to measure brightness. But some so-called "HDR-compatible" TVs can only produce 100 to 300 nits, so they don't have the headroom to produce the peak levels of brightness required for HDR. As a result, we have some TVs in our labs that use the acronym HDR in their packaging, but that don’t look much different from standard dynamic range sets.

SOURCE: http://www.consumerreports.org/lcd-led-oled-tvs/what-is-an-hdr-tv-and-should-i-get-one/
Your right it depends on your budget really i want a 10 bit panel myself but i know il.have to pay double this at least for a 55 inch 10 bit screen its all down to what your willing to spend and what your requirements are

pretty sure the h55m7000 from hisense is 10bit and 55" for "£799"
#6
HDR means nothing in relation to this TV. A feature improperly implemented is a useless feature.
#7
looking to get new telly any good this?
#8
m1c88
looking to get new telly any good this?
You get what you pay for. I would go OLED its the tech of the future. Not these TV's
#9
ikduncan
kaiser051
cutthroat_jake
"HDR Compatible" whatever that means?Big Differences in HDR Performance
Unfortunately, though, what we've found so far in our labs is that while some HDR-capable TVs produce super-bright, colorful HDR images, others don’t. How can this be? Well, some televisions have the hardware to really take full advantage of HDR. Others can only read the HDR metadata, which is the information embedded in the digital signal that tells the TV how the image should be displayed. These sets, which are being called "HDR-capable" or "HDR-compatible," then try to accommodate the instructions as best they can, based on the TV's capabilities.
Brightness, for example, is a big challenge. Top-performing TVs with HDR can hit anywhere from 500 to 1,000 nits, the unit used to measure brightness. But some so-called "HDR-compatible" TVs can only produce 100 to 300 nits, so they don't have the headroom to produce the peak levels of brightness required for HDR. As a result, we have some TVs in our labs that use the acronym HDR in their packaging, but that don’t look much different from standard dynamic range sets.

SOURCE: http://www.consumerreports.org/lcd-led-oled-tvs/what-is-an-hdr-tv-and-should-i-get-one/
Your right it depends on your budget really i want a 10 bit panel myself but i know il.have to pay double this at least for a 55 inch 10 bit screen its all down to what your willing to spend and what your requirements are

pretty sure the h55m7000 from hisense is 10bit and 55" for "£799"


I've got so confused especially with some TVs having a genuine 10bit panel but then having a processing unit that's 8+2 which defeats the purpose as its designed for 8bit panels essentially.
this leaves me in a bind.

I've been looking for a 55" TV for a month or two now budget of around 1200 and reviews leave me with no clear answer.
I understand that I will not get any perfect TV for that budget but I expect a decent enough picture at least that makes me glad I didn't pay 400 pounds for a cheap one!.

I did look at the hisense 7000 series and they seem functional.albeit expensive compared to everyone else given that they are not Sony, LG or Samsung where you have to pay a hundred or two for the label.

anyone got any suggestions.

main uses will be TV, movies and ps4. SD and HD sources.

cheers.
#10
ikduncan
kaiser051
cutthroat_jake
"HDR Compatible" whatever that means?Big Differences in HDR Performance
Unfortunately, though, what we've found so far in our labs is that while some HDR-capable TVs produce super-bright, colorful HDR images, others don’t. How can this be? Well, some televisions have the hardware to really take full advantage of HDR. Others can only read the HDR metadata, which is the information embedded in the digital signal that tells the TV how the image should be displayed. These sets, which are being called "HDR-capable" or "HDR-compatible," then try to accommodate the instructions as best they can, based on the TV's capabilities.
Brightness, for example, is a big challenge. Top-performing TVs with HDR can hit anywhere from 500 to 1,000 nits, the unit used to measure brightness. But some so-called "HDR-compatible" TVs can only produce 100 to 300 nits, so they don't have the headroom to produce the peak levels of brightness required for HDR. As a result, we have some TVs in our labs that use the acronym HDR in their packaging, but that don’t look much different from standard dynamic range sets.

SOURCE: http://www.consumerreports.org/lcd-led-oled-tvs/what-is-an-hdr-tv-and-should-i-get-one/
Your right it depends on your budget really i want a 10 bit panel myself but i know il.have to pay double this at least for a 55 inch 10 bit screen its all down to what your willing to spend and what your requirements are
pretty sure the h55m7000 from hisense is 10bit and 55" for "£799"
Thats also a 8 bit panel mate the 65 inch may be 10 bit

http://www.displayspecifications.com/en/model/1beb5f1

Edited By: kaiser051 on Oct 30, 2016 12:08
#11
not a good deal imho as a 7000 hisense series can be had for a bit more (£849) with a 6 yr warranty @ Richer sounds.

Edited By: afroylnt on Oct 30, 2016 14:22
#12
What's the warranty or guarantee on these from Amazon?
#13
afroylnt
not a good deal imho as a 7000 hisense series can be had for a bit more (£849) with a 6 yr warranty @ Richer sounds.
True but thats a extra £150 for the same 8 bit panel
#14
kaiser051
afroylnt
not a good deal imho as a 7000 hisense series can be had for a bit more (£849) with a 6 yr warranty @ Richer sounds.
True but thats a extra £150 for the same 8 bit panel
I thought the 7000 series had the 10 bit panels?
#15
afroylnt
kaiser051
afroylnt
not a good deal imho as a 7000 hisense series can be had for a bit more (£849) with a 6 yr warranty @ Richer sounds.
True but thats a extra £150 for the same 8 bit panel
I thought the 7000 series had the 10 bit panels?
The h55m7000 has a 8 bit panel according to hisense specs
http://www.displayspecifications.com/en/model/1beb5f1

The 65 inch has 10 bit

Edited By: kaiser051 on Oct 30, 2016 16:31
1 Like #16
I agree that a 10 bit panel is better but for people not willing to pay tge extra £400 plus this might suit i will wait myself and see does the price on 10 bit drop next year
1 Like #17
kaiser051
afroylnt
kaiser051
afroylnt
not a good deal imho as a 7000 hisense series can be had for a bit more (£849) with a 6 yr warranty @ Richer sounds.
True but thats a extra £150 for the same 8 bit panel
I thought the 7000 series had the 10 bit panels?
The h55m7000 has a 8 bit panel according to hisense specs http://www.displayspecifications.com/en/model/1beb5f1
The 65 inch has 10 bit
As usual with HDR TVs specs are a bit confusing; worth waiting for a 10 bit 55 then I think
1 Like #18
Personally I wouldn't buy any TV right now, not with the Black Friday sales around the corner. 4k TV's are one of the biggest selling consumer tech items and there will undoubtedly be some very good offers going next month, especially on the more budget priced TV's.
#19
ikduncan
kaiser051
cutthroat_jake
"HDR Compatible" whatever that means?Big Differences in HDR Performance
Unfortunately, though, what we've found so far in our labs is that while some HDR-capable TVs produce super-bright, colorful HDR images, others don’t. How can this be? Well, some televisions have the hardware to really take full advantage of HDR. Others can only read the HDR metadata, which is the information embedded in the digital signal that tells the TV how the image should be displayed. These sets, which are being called "HDR-capable" or "HDR-compatible," then try to accommodate the instructions as best they can, based on the TV's capabilities.
Brightness, for example, is a big challenge. Top-performing TVs with HDR can hit anywhere from 500 to 1,000 nits, the unit used to measure brightness. But some so-called "HDR-compatible" TVs can only produce 100 to 300 nits, so they don't have the headroom to produce the peak levels of brightness required for HDR. As a result, we have some TVs in our labs that use the acronym HDR in their packaging, but that don’t look much different from standard dynamic range sets.

SOURCE: http://www.consumerreports.org/lcd-led-oled-tvs/what-is-an-hdr-tv-and-should-i-get-one/
Your right it depends on your budget really i want a 10 bit panel myself but i know il.have to pay double this at least for a 55 inch 10 bit screen its all down to what your willing to spend and what your requirements are
pretty sure the h55m7000 from hisense is 10bit and 55" for "£799"
8 Bit............http://www.displayspecifications.com/en/model/1beb5f1
#20
anybody tried compare on that site? so far, all the 10bit panels are 8+2, cant find any 10bit
#21
Is this 8bit panel?

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