Homebase: Masterplug Double Socket with USB Charging £8.98 - HotUKDeals
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Homebase: Masterplug Double Socket with USB Charging £8.98

£8.98 @ Homebase
I just saw this in a flyer and found it online too. Read More
ramraideruk Avatar
4m, 4w agoFound 4 months, 4 weeks ago
I just saw this in a flyer and found it online too.
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ramraideruk Avatar
4m, 4w agoFound 4 months, 4 weeks ago
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1 Like #2
Expect to be told it is useless as it's not 3.1 volts despite the price. Also expect to be told it is unsafe as you can't switch the USB off.
#3
Also waste of electricity if cannot turn off
1 Like #4
HotUKDuncan
Expect to be told it is useless as it's not 3.1 volts despite the price. Also expect to be told it is unsafe as you can't switch the USB off.


now told
1 Like #5
If nothing is plugged into the USB port it is NOT using electricity, there is no load/resistance to generate a current flow.
#6
Twin pack £11.99 at Argos
4 Likes #7
sam_of_london
Also waste of electricity if cannot turn off


change your name to Sam full of misinformation.
why do you think you can go to poundland and take a blurred photo of anything random you can afford, stick that on here as a deal, when its a pound or less all the time, then hunt for someone else's deals to spread misinformation about,
is it because your jealous?
#8
They can waste electricity if badly designed - just like some badly designed plugin chargers (not so much nowadays, but was much more common)

There are also safety issues with some of them (eg. general poor construction, poor separation between mains and low voltage side, poor design of the LV side). Hopefully not with decent brand products, but I'd be very wary of cheap ones, no name one etc. juts like I'm very wary of cheap plugin chargers (one got extremely hot and plastic deformed, one started buzzing and fell apart). It's really not worth it for saving a few quid.

And in a few years when it's all USB-C they will be annoying :-)
2 Likes #9
Used to be vaguely concerned about the waste of electricity leaving chargers plugged in (not enough to really do anything about it, but still...) - until EDF came and fitted the smart meter last week - now we have a readout of our current use in pence per hour... of course did the standard thing of going round turning things on and off to see what uses what.

Turns out that our night time use, with 3 fridges, 3 TVs, a couple of radios, and a monitor on standby, a laptop "sleeping" but active, 2 printers on standby, android box, fire stick and 2 chromecasts plugged in, 3 active baby monitor cameras plus receiver, a small nightlight, and lastly at least half a dozen chargers plugged in (that I can think of)... with all that going on, our use is... 1p per hour. I'm well aware it all adds up, and that's £90ish a year, but I'll happily pay that not to run around switching all that stuff on and off at the plug every day.

Other appliances are something else entirely of course - we've become allergic to the tumble dryer in the space of a week (24pph!), the microwave isn't as popular as it once was (19pph), the oven gets turned off the second supper is done (lots pph), and watching the monitor while boiling the kettle has almost ruined my morning cuppa!
2 Likes #10
bazpoint
Used to be vaguely concerned about the waste of electricity leaving chargers plugged in (not enough to really do anything about it, but still...) - until EDF came and fitted the smart meter last week - now we have a readout of our current use in pence per hour... of course did the standard thing of going round turning things on and off to see what uses what.
Turns out that our night time use, with 3 fridges, 3 TVs, a couple of radios, and a monitor on standby, a laptop "sleeping" but active, 2 printers on standby, android box, fire stick and 2 chromecasts plugged in, 3 active baby monitor cameras plus receiver, a small nightlight, and lastly at least half a dozen chargers plugged in (that I can think of)... with all that going on, our use is... 1p per hour. I'm well aware it all adds up, and that's £90ish a year, but I'll happily pay that not to run around switching all that stuff on and off at the plug every day.
Other appliances are something else entirely of course - we've become allergic to the tumble dryer in the space of a week (24pph!), the microwave isn't as popular as it once was (19pph), the oven gets turned off the second supper is done (lots pph), and watching the monitor while boiling the kettle has almost ruined my morning cuppa!
Tumble dryer 24p per hour? I don't actually think that's too bad! oO
3 Likes #11
Soukmadik
If nothing is plugged into the USB port it is NOT using electricity, there is no load/resistance to generate a current flow.

That's not true, all AC-DC convertors draw a small idle current when no load is attached.

There are some USB wall sockets that detect if no items are plugged in and switch off the power but this doesn't look to be one of them.
#12
mummymelly
bazpoint
Used to be vaguely concerned about the waste of electricity leaving chargers plugged in (not enough to really do anything about it, but still...) - until EDF came and fitted the smart meter last week - now we have a readout of our current use in pence per hour... of course did the standard thing of going round turning things on and off to see what uses what.
Turns out that our night time use, with 3 fridges, 3 TVs, a couple of radios, and a monitor on standby, a laptop "sleeping" but active, 2 printers on standby, android box, fire stick and 2 chromecasts plugged in, 3 active baby monitor cameras plus receiver, a small nightlight, and lastly at least half a dozen chargers plugged in (that I can think of)... with all that going on, our use is... 1p per hour. I'm well aware it all adds up, and that's £90ish a year, but I'll happily pay that not to run around switching all that stuff on and off at the plug every day.
Other appliances are something else entirely of course - we've become allergic to the tumble dryer in the space of a week (24pph!), the microwave isn't as popular as it once was (19pph), the oven gets turned off the second supper is done (lots pph), and watching the monitor while boiling the kettle has almost ruined my morning cuppa!
Tumble dryer 24p per hour? I don't actually think that's too bad! oO


Haha, that's on the cooler "synthetics" setting - I haven't checked what it is on "cottons" yet!
1 Like #13
bazpoint
Used to be vaguely concerned about the waste of electricity leaving chargers plugged in (not enough to really do anything about it, but still...) - until EDF came and fitted the smart meter last week - now we have a readout of our current use in pence per hour... of course did the standard thing of going round turning things on and off to see what uses what.
Turns out that our night time use, with 3 fridges, 3 TVs, a couple of radios, and a monitor on standby, a laptop "sleeping" but active, 2 printers on standby, android box, fire stick and 2 chromecasts plugged in, 3 active baby monitor cameras plus receiver, a small nightlight, and lastly at least half a dozen chargers plugged in (that I can think of)... with all that going on, our use is... 1p per hour. I'm well aware it all adds up, and that's £90ish a year, but I'll happily pay that not to run around switching all that stuff on and off at the plug every day.
Other appliances are something else entirely of course - we've become allergic to the tumble dryer in the space of a week (24pph!), the microwave isn't as popular as it once was (19pph), the oven gets turned off the second supper is done (lots pph), and watching the monitor while boiling the kettle has almost ruined my morning cuppa!
Well said. I don't have a smart meter and refuse to get one as life is too short to be worrying about living on a timer ! Allways suspected items on sleep mode used not enough to worry about and as I use about a third of what you do £30 a year is a good price to save me living time to turn them all off !!
#14
looks a good deal but I bought the Lisse USB socket from Homebase.
you buy the shelf seperate for an extra 1.99 . I have put one in my sons room to stop his tablet and phone from being kicked/trodden on and have also put one in the kitchen. It also comes with a spacer so it will fit 25mm back boxes
#15
Gormond
Soukmadik
If nothing is plugged into the USB port it is NOT using electricity, there is no load/resistance to generate a current flow.
That's not true, all AC-DC convertors draw a small idle current when no load is attached.
There are some USB wall sockets that detect if no items are plugged in and switch off the power but this doesn't look to be one of them.

From the MK website ......Zero standby power consumption, auto disconnect when plug
removed,

https://www.mkelectric.com/Documents/2015%20Catalogue%20Update/Catalogue%20PDF/UKMK393-0315-EN_USB_FINAL.pdf

(_;)
#16
bazpoint
Used to be vaguely concerned about the waste of electricity leaving chargers plugged in (not enough to really do anything about it, but still...) - until EDF came and fitted the smart meter last week - now we have a readout of our current use in pence per hour... of course did the standard thing of going round turning things on and off to see what uses what.
Turns out that our night time use, with 3 fridges, 3 TVs, a couple of radios, and a monitor on standby, a laptop "sleeping" but active, 2 printers on standby, android box, fire stick and 2 chromecasts plugged in, 3 active baby monitor cameras plus receiver, a small nightlight, and lastly at least half a dozen chargers plugged in (that I can think of)... with all that going on, our use is... 1p per hour. I'm well aware it all adds up, and that's £90ish a year, but I'll happily pay that not to run around switching all that stuff on and off at the plug every day.
Other appliances are something else entirely of course - we've become allergic to the tumble dryer in the space of a week (24pph!), the microwave isn't as popular as it once was (19pph), the oven gets turned off the second supper is done (lots pph), and watching the monitor while boiling the kettle has almost ruined my morning cuppa!

Mate you're doing it wrong. Just flick the main switch on your CU and everything will go off without having to run around :p
#17
If this shares the 2.1A between ports while two devices are connected it might result in slow charges.
#18
bazpoint
Used to be vaguely concerned about the waste of electricity leaving chargers plugged in (not enough to really do anything about it, but still...) - until EDF came and fitted the smart meter last week - now we have a readout of our current use in pence per hour... of course did the standard thing of going round turning things on and off to see what uses what.
Turns out that our night time use, with 3 fridges, 3 TVs, a couple of radios, and a monitor on standby, a laptop "sleeping" but active, 2 printers on standby, android box, fire stick and 2 chromecasts plugged in, 3 active baby monitor cameras plus receiver, a small nightlight, and lastly at least half a dozen chargers plugged in (that I can think of)... with all that going on, our use is... 1p per hour. I'm well aware it all adds up, and that's £90ish a year, but I'll happily pay that not to run around switching all that stuff on and off at the plug every day.

Oh sure, I wasn't really commenting as regards cost, just a reply to the comment about them not using any electricity when something not plugged in. Modern chargers are very good, pretty much switching off, just a very tiny. power usage but some old ones were pretty rubbish. Certainly not worth worrying about them all. Certainly modern producta on standby use <1W nowadays. It's the white goods that rack up the pounds really

Surprised your night time usage is that low though. 1p/hr suggests about equivalent of 100W running continuously, which isn't much. We don't get anywhere near that, our base load is in the order of about 400 W IIRC (though there is a fish tank - 100W heater on a roughly 50% duty cycle and a low power server on 24/7)
#19
Soukmadik
Gormond
Soukmadik
If nothing is plugged into the USB port it is NOT using electricity, there is no load/resistance to generate a current flow.
That's not true, all AC-DC convertors draw a small idle current when no load is attached.
There are some USB wall sockets that detect if no items are plugged in and switch off the power but this doesn't look to be one of them.
From the MK website ......Zero standby power consumption, auto disconnect when plug
removed,https://www.mkelectric.com/Documents/2015%20Catalogue%20Update/Catalogue%20PDF/UKMK393-0315-EN_USB_FINAL.pdf(_;)
That's because it will have a mechanical switch in the socket to switch off the supply (like a shaver socket). Nice try but no cigar.
#20
Soukmadik
Gormond
Soukmadik
If nothing is plugged into the USB port it is NOT using electricity, there is no load/resistance to generate a current flow.
That's not true, all AC-DC convertors draw a small idle current when no load is attached.
There are some USB wall sockets that detect if no items are plugged in and switch off the power but this doesn't look to be one of them.
From the MK website ......Zero standby power consumption, auto disconnect when plug
removed,https://www.mkelectric.com/Documents/2015%20Catalogue%20Update/Catalogue%20PDF/UKMK393-0315-EN_USB_FINAL.pdf(_;)
What's your point here? I already said that some products can do that but this isn't one of them.
1 Like #21
PiratePete
bazpoint
Used to be vaguely concerned about the waste of electricity leaving chargers plugged in (not enough to really do anything about it, but still...) - until EDF came and fitted the smart meter last week - now we have a readout of our current use in pence per hour... of course did the standard thing of going round turning things on and off to see what uses what.
Turns out that our night time use, with 3 fridges, 3 TVs, a couple of radios, and a monitor on standby, a laptop "sleeping" but active, 2 printers on standby, android box, fire stick and 2 chromecasts plugged in, 3 active baby monitor cameras plus receiver, a small nightlight, and lastly at least half a dozen chargers plugged in (that I can think of)... with all that going on, our use is... 1p per hour. I'm well aware it all adds up, and that's £90ish a year, but I'll happily pay that not to run around switching all that stuff on and off at the plug every day.
Other appliances are something else entirely of course - we've become allergic to the tumble dryer in the space of a week (24pph!), the microwave isn't as popular as it once was (19pph), the oven gets turned off the second supper is done (lots pph), and watching the monitor while boiling the kettle has almost ruined my morning cuppa!
Well said. I don't have a smart meter and refuse to get one as life is too short to be worrying about living on a timer ! Allways suspected items on sleep mode used not enough to worry about and as I use about a third of what you do £30 a year is a good price to save me living time to turn them all off !!
For some like me, although mainly motivated by my wallet, it's an ethical decision too. Until 100% green energy is coming into our homes, I'm not happy leaving devices plugged in pulling power when they're not in use.
1 Like #22
shadey12
sam_of_london
Also waste of electricity if cannot turn off

change your name to Sam full of misinformation.
why do you think you can go to poundland and take a blurred photo of anything random you can afford, stick that on here as a deal, when its a pound or less all the time, then hunt for someone else's deals to spread misinformation about,
is it because your jealous?
Seen this bloke spouting rubbish so many times previously. Can we not just ban him on the grounds of being unfactual? X)
#23
galoka
bazpoint
Used to be vaguely concerned about the waste of electricity leaving chargers plugged in (not enough to really do anything about it, but still...) - until EDF came and fitted the smart meter last week - now we have a readout of our current use in pence per hour... of course did the standard thing of going round turning things on and off to see what uses what.
Turns out that our night time use, with 3 fridges, 3 TVs, a couple of radios, and a monitor on standby, a laptop "sleeping" but active, 2 printers on standby, android box, fire stick and 2 chromecasts plugged in, 3 active baby monitor cameras plus receiver, a small nightlight, and lastly at least half a dozen chargers plugged in (that I can think of)... with all that going on, our use is... 1p per hour. I'm well aware it all adds up, and that's £90ish a year, but I'll happily pay that not to run around switching all that stuff on and off at the plug every day.
Oh sure, I wasn't really commenting as regards cost, just a reply to the comment about them not using any electricity when something not plugged in. Modern chargers are very good, pretty much switching off, just a very tiny. power usage but some old ones were pretty rubbish. Certainly not worth worrying about them all. Certainly modern producta on standby use <1W nowadays. It's the white goods that rack up the pounds really
Surprised your night time usage is that low though. 1p/hr suggests about equivalent of 100W running continuously, which isn't much. We don't get anywhere near that, our base load is in the order of about 400 W IIRC (though there is a fish tank - 100W heater on a roughly 50% duty cycle and a low power server on 24/7)
I expect you know this but others might not: if you measure your consumption with a clip-on energy meter (or even a cheap plug-in one) it takes no account of power factor, and the power factor of small electronic devices is very poor. The net result is that the meter will give an inaccurately high reading when there is not much power being consumed. Timing the flashes on the electricity meter (or the display on a smart meter) is the only way to get an accurate figure.
#24
pibpob
Soukmadik
Gormond
Soukmadik
If nothing is plugged into the USB port it is NOT using electricity, there is no load/resistance to generate a current flow.
That's not true, all AC-DC convertors draw a small idle current when no load is attached.
There are some USB wall sockets that detect if no items are plugged in and switch off the power but this doesn't look to be one of them.
From the MK website ......Zero standby power consumption, auto disconnect when plug
removed,https://www.mkelectric.com/Documents/2015%20Catalogue%20Update/Catalogue%20PDF/UKMK393-0315-EN_USB_FINAL.pdf(_;)
That's because it will have a mechanical switch in the socket to switch off the supply (like a shaver socket). Nice try but no cigar.

I apologise if the term "AUTO DISCONNECT" confuses you......... no banana for you :D

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