HomeGuard WOB753 Wireless All Scan Camera ~ £28.49 @ Ebuyer (P&P £4.60) - HotUKDeals
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HomeGuard WOB753 Wireless All Scan Camera ~ £28.49 @ Ebuyer (P&P £4.60)

£28.49 @ Ebuyer
The HomeGuard HD 720P Wireless Pan-Tilt-Zoom Dome Camera is a simple to use 720P IP camera that can be conveniently positioned within the home (within wireless range of your internet router) and remot… Read More
fennekin Avatar
banned4m, 1d agoFound 4 months, 1 day ago
The HomeGuard HD 720P Wireless Pan-Tilt-Zoom Dome Camera is a simple to use 720P IP camera that can be conveniently positioned within the home (within wireless range of your internet router) and remotely controlled from your computer, tablet or SmartPhone. It features great picture quality, capturing video in full HD 720P at 30 frames per second, a micro SD socket to capture video onto a micro SD card (up to 64GB, included built-in 8GB micro SD card) and a wealth of other great features. If you want a simple surveillance product to protect your home or a discreet way to monitor children, elderly relatives or pets wherever you are in the world, then this is the ideal solution for you.

HOMEGUARD offers a range of affordable CCTV Solutions for home or small business security. With a range of Security cameras, digital video recorders, Wireless&IP Cameras and other accessories, Our aim is to offer high-quality products and service without the premium price.

Features
• Superb Picture Quality with HD 720P Resolution
• Remotely Control Camera via Computer & Smart Devices
• Easy Setup, 100% Plug & Play via iOS, Android, Windows PC and Mac
• Local Micro SD storage up to 64GB (included built-in 8GB micro SD card)
• Motion Detection, Send Picture or Video to Micro SD Card / FTP / Email

Specifications
- Hardware Features 10/100Mbps RJ45 Port,WI-FI Support, Power Interface, Reset Button, Built-in 8GB Micro SD Card, 22 infrared LED, 20m Night Vision Range
- Resolution 1280 x 720, 640 x 360, 320 x 180
- IR-CUT YES
- Compression/Max Frame Rate H.264/MJPEG, 30fps
- Image Sensor / Lens 1/4" CMOS Sensor, f=6mm, F=2.0 Viewing Angle:45°
- Pan / Tilt Range Horizontal 350°, Vertical 90°
- Motion Detection Supported, Will Activate Camera
- Security Protocols 64/128-bit WEP, WPA/WPA2, WPA-PSK/WPA2-PSK,WPS
- Camera Dimensions 215mm x 130mm x 237mm
- Power Input 12V DC, <10W

Contents
- HD 720p Wireless Pan-Tilt-Zoom Dome Camera
- Power Adapter
- Wifi Antenna
- Mounting Bracket Set
- RJ45 Network Cable
- Manual
Deal Tags:
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fennekin Avatar
banned4m, 1d agoFound 4 months, 1 day ago
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(28) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
1 Like #1
Great price
banned#2
lucyferror
Great price
I think so too, unfortunately ...
banned#4
This price is with shipping cost ?
1 Like #5
I think you need 1080 , If I'm not mistaken this is 720 which will give you a bad pic if zooming in.
#6
Georgedeals
I think you need 1080 , If I'm not mistaken this is 720 which will give you a bad pic if zooming in.


+1
#7
Be aware of data protection issues on domestic CCTV if using ptz...
#8
mrwhitelabel
Be aware of data protection issues on domestic CCTV if using ptz...

For example....
#9
Initially very tempted but lack of info and the rather mixed reviews on Home Gaurd stuff on amazon has put me off. I like using a browser to operate, configure and view recordings but I cant find out whether or not this camera supports it.

I have a few 720p Foscam C1's around the home and they're perfectly fine when it comes to image quality. Like most cameras that use digital zoom, even with 1080p examples the image will always degrade when zoomed in. If this camera uses optical zoom there should be little to no image deterioration when zoomed in.
#10
Graham1979
mrwhitelabel
Be aware of data protection issues on domestic CCTV if using ptz...
For example....


ok well its more than data protection issues , as officially cctv for private use by an individual is not subject to the ICO requirements of data storage etc that commercial ones are if it just covers your property BUT
you also need to be aware that if your camera(s) captures images outside the confines of your of household, those images are subject to the DPA.
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/domestic-cctv-using-cctv-systems-on-your-property/domestic-cctv-using-cctv-systems-on-your-property

however ptz cameras open up the can of worms of harrassment and voyerism charges that can occur as a result of their missuse by being able to track people and zoom in to personal areas.
it depends on their fitting location, their field of view and how is likely to walk past that field of view and where you can zoom too. its a complex grey area, and more a be aware of what you do with it, rather than a dont do it.
as guidence


This document helps you to understand what you need to do if you are considering installing (or have already installed) a CCTV system on your property. A CCTV system includes the camera, storage, recording and all associated equipment.

1. Surveillance Camera Commissioner
The Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 introduced the regulation of public space surveillance cameras in England and Wales. As a result the surveillance camera code of practice (2013) was issued by the Secretary of State under section 30 of the act to ensure that the use of cameras in public places is regulated and only used in pursuit of a specified purpose. The code, which came into force on 12 August 2013, seeks to balance the need for cameras in public places with individuals’ right to privacy.

The code applies to the use of surveillance camera systems that operate in public places in England and Wales, regardless of whether or not there is any live viewing or recording of images or information or associated data. The role of the Surveillance Camera Commissioner (SCC) is to encourage compliance, review operations and provide advice about the code.

You can contact the SCC at [email protected]

2. Information Commissioner’s Office
The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) regulates and enforces the Data Protection Act (DPA) which covers images being recorded by CCTV cameras. Please note that in light of the Rynes judgment by the Court of Justice of the European Union, if your CCTV covers any areas beyond the boundaries of your property it will no longer be regarded as domestic processing and be exempt from the DPA. If you have any questions or complaints about the use of domestic CCTV, please contact the ICO at [email protected] or call 0303 123 1113.

3. General guidance
An individual has the right to protect their property and this can be done by using a CCTV system where it is necessary, such as a security measure. However, the Surveillance Camera Commissioner recommends that users of CCTV systems should operate them in a responsible way to respect the privacy of others.

A CCTV system to protect a domestic dwelling from acts of crime and anti-social behaviour is now commonplace. Although this seems a reasonable use, there have been a number of complaints to the police, ICO and the SCC from neighbours and other members of the public using pavements in the vicinity who believe that cameras are being used to spy on them and their families.

Below is a short set of considerations to guide you through steps for ensuring that your CCTV security system reduces the risk of intruding on the privacy of others, including neighbours.

3.1 Reasons for getting a CCTV system
Think about the following questions before getting a CCTV system:

why do I need CCTV?
could I use another means to protect my home, such as improved lighting?
what do I want my CCTV camera to view and record? (this could be the front door, a parking space, the back yard, a shed etc)
3.2 How your CCTV system affects others
It is important to consider the privacy of others while setting up your system. Ask yourself:

where will I position the CCTV to ensure minimal intrusion in to my neighbour’s and other people’s privacy?
will the range of the cameras overlook my neighbour’s property, pavements and other areas? (if so, consider ways to reduce intrusion such as using privacy filters)
how will my neighbours feel about my CCTV?
1 Like #11
mrwhitelabel
Be aware of data protection issues on domestic CCTV if using ptz...
Wouldn't want any criminals rights breached eh...
#12
Guessing the zoom is digital as it only lists fixed lens size, to all the haters and CCTV pro's... this is great value and although I have a fully setup ip system, I've just ordered a couple of these (free P&P over 50 quid). 10yrs back you couldn't have bought this for a 500 quid!
2 Likes #13
mrwhitelabel
Graham1979
mrwhitelabel
Be aware of data protection issues on domestic CCTV if using ptz...
For example....

ok well its more than data protection issues , as officially cctv for private use by an individual is not subject to the ICO requirements of data storage etc that commercial ones are if it just covers your property BUT
you also need to be aware that if your camera(s) captures images outside the confines of your of household, those images are subject to the DPA.
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/domestic-cctv-using-cctv-systems-on-your-property/domestic-cctv-using-cctv-systems-on-your-property

however ptz cameras open up the can of worms of harrassment and voyerism charges that can occur as a result of their missuse by being able to track people and zoom in to personal areas.
it depends on their fitting location, their field of view and how is likely to walk past that field of view and where you can zoom too. its a complex grey area, and more a be aware of what you do with it, rather than a dont do it.
as guidence


This document helps you to understand what you need to do if you are considering installing (or have already installed) a CCTV system on your property. A CCTV system includes the camera, storage, recording and all associated equipment.

1. Surveillance Camera Commissioner
The Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 introduced the regulation of public space surveillance cameras in England and Wales. As a result the surveillance camera code of practice (2013) was issued by the Secretary of State under section 30 of the act to ensure that the use of cameras in public places is regulated and only used in pursuit of a specified purpose. The code, which came into force on 12 August 2013, seeks to balance the need for cameras in public places with individuals’ right to privacy.

The code applies to the use of surveillance camera systems that operate in public places in England and Wales, regardless of whether or not there is any live viewing or recording of images or information or associated data. The role of the Surveillance Camera Commissioner (SCC) is to encourage compliance, review operations and provide advice about the code.

You can contact the SCC at [email protected]

2. Information Commissioner’s Office
The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) regulates and enforces the Data Protection Act (DPA) which covers images being recorded by CCTV cameras. Please note that in light of the Rynes judgment by the Court of Justice of the European Union, if your CCTV covers any areas beyond the boundaries of your property it will no longer be regarded as domestic processing and be exempt from the DPA. If you have any questions or complaints about the use of domestic CCTV, please contact the ICO at [email protected] or call 0303 123 1113.

3. General guidance
An individual has the right to protect their property and this can be done by using a CCTV system where it is necessary, such as a security measure. However, the Surveillance Camera Commissioner recommends that users of CCTV systems should operate them in a responsible way to respect the privacy of others.

A CCTV system to protect a domestic dwelling from acts of crime and anti-social behaviour is now commonplace. Although this seems a reasonable use, there have been a number of complaints to the police, ICO and the SCC from neighbours and other members of the public using pavements in the vicinity who believe that cameras are being used to spy on them and their families.

Below is a short set of considerations to guide you through steps for ensuring that your CCTV security system reduces the risk of intruding on the privacy of others, including neighbours.

3.1 Reasons for getting a CCTV system
Think about the following questions before getting a CCTV system:

why do I need CCTV?
could I use another means to protect my home, such as improved lighting?
what do I want my CCTV camera to view and record? (this could be the front door, a parking space, the back yard, a shed etc)
3.2 How your CCTV system affects others
It is important to consider the privacy of others while setting up your system. Ask yourself:

where will I position the CCTV to ensure minimal intrusion in to my neighbour’s and other people’s privacy?
will the range of the cameras overlook my neighbour’s property, pavements and other areas? (if so, consider ways to reduce intrusion such as using privacy filters)
how will my neighbours feel about my CCTV?
There's a lot of things people shouldn't do... like the scroat that stole my daughters dashcam and saynav from her car out side our house last sunday morning... idiot country too concerned with other peoples rights whilst their own get trampled...
#14
mrwhitelabel
Be aware of data protection issues on domestic CCTV if using ptz...


Nothing to be aware of then.
#15
Out of stock now
#16
link I posted isn't
#17
Waldolf
mrwhitelabel
Be aware of data protection issues on domestic CCTV if using ptz...
Nothing to be aware of then.
Depends on the type of neighbours you have and if they are gonna moan and complain about you.....
#18
stealth666
mrwhitelabel
Graham1979
mrwhitelabel
Be aware of data protection issues on domestic CCTV if using ptz...
For example....
ok well its more than data protection issues , as officially cctv for private use by an individual is not subject to the ICO requirements of data storage etc that commercial ones are if it just covers your property BUT
you also need to be aware that if your camera(s) captures images outside the confines of your of household, those images are subject to the DPA.
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/domestic-cctv-using-cctv-systems-on-your-property/domestic-cctv-using-cctv-systems-on-your-property

however ptz cameras open up the can of worms of harrassment and voyerism charges that can occur as a result of their missuse by being able to track people and zoom in to personal areas.
it depends on their fitting location, their field of view and how is likely to walk past that field of view and where you can zoom too. its a complex grey area, and more a be aware of what you do with it, rather than a dont do it.
as guidence


This document helps you to understand what you need to do if you are considering installing (or have already installed) a CCTV system on your property. A CCTV system includes the camera, storage, recording and all associated equipment.

1. Surveillance Camera Commissioner
The Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 introduced the regulation of public space surveillance cameras in England and Wales. As a result the surveillance camera code of practice (2013) was issued by the Secretary of State under section 30 of the act to ensure that the use of cameras in public places is regulated and only used in pursuit of a specified purpose. The code, which came into force on 12 August 2013, seeks to balance the need for cameras in public places with individuals’ right to privacy.

The code applies to the use of surveillance camera systems that operate in public places in England and Wales, regardless of whether or not there is any live viewing or recording of images or information or associated data. The role of the Surveillance Camera Commissioner (SCC) is to encourage compliance, review operations and provide advice about the code.

You can contact the SCC at [email protected]

2. Information Commissioner’s Office
The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) regulates and enforces the Data Protection Act (DPA) which covers images being recorded by CCTV cameras. Please note that in light of the Rynes judgment by the Court of Justice of the European Union, if your CCTV covers any areas beyond the boundaries of your property it will no longer be regarded as domestic processing and be exempt from the DPA. If you have any questions or complaints about the use of domestic CCTV, please contact the ICO at [email protected] or call 0303 123 1113.

3. General guidance
An individual has the right to protect their property and this can be done by using a CCTV system where it is necessary, such as a security measure. However, the Surveillance Camera Commissioner recommends that users of CCTV systems should operate them in a responsible way to respect the privacy of others.

A CCTV system to protect a domestic dwelling from acts of crime and anti-social behaviour is now commonplace. Although this seems a reasonable use, there have been a number of complaints to the police, ICO and the SCC from neighbours and other members of the public using pavements in the vicinity who believe that cameras are being used to spy on them and their families.

Below is a short set of considerations to guide you through steps for ensuring that your CCTV security system reduces the risk of intruding on the privacy of others, including neighbours.

3.1 Reasons for getting a CCTV system
Think about the following questions before getting a CCTV system:

why do I need CCTV?
could I use another means to protect my home, such as improved lighting?
what do I want my CCTV camera to view and record? (this could be the front door, a parking space, the back yard, a shed etc)
3.2 How your CCTV system affects others
It is important to consider the privacy of others while setting up your system. Ask yourself:

where will I position the CCTV to ensure minimal intrusion in to my neighbour’s and other people’s privacy?
will the range of the cameras overlook my neighbour’s property, pavements and other areas? (if so, consider ways to reduce intrusion such as using privacy filters)
how will my neighbours feel about my CCTV?
There's a lot of things people shouldn't do... like the scroat that stole my daughters dashcam and saynav from her car out side our house last sunday morning... idiot country too concerned with other peoples rights whilst their own get trampled...


I posted more so people don't have legal issues.

Fixed cameras rarely get grief but ptz seem to attract a lot more attention and complaints .
Though to be fair if a neighbour has one of these towards my bedroom I'd not be happy either. .

https://youtu.be/5iH4yggzsQU

Edited By: mrwhitelabel on Dec 24, 2016 09:39: Edit
#19
stealth666
Guessing the zoom is digital as it only lists fixed lens size, to all the haters and CCTV pro's... this is great value and although I have a fully setup ip system, I've just ordered a couple of these (free P&P over 50 quid). 10yrs back you couldn't have bought this for a 500 quid!

For sure tech is so cheap now

I have a x6 2mp ip camera setup for reference.
Some on property some overlook road. I use motion detection masking though so only records when they come on to boundries
#20
I ordered these from tekshop247 and just had an email to say they have cancelled my order as they don't have any (despite showing 30 in stock when I ordered).

Did anyone get theirs from eBuyer ? Any good ?
#21
bbdom
turner brown
ebuyer seemed down but found them here for about the same price if not a few P cheaper http://www.tekshop247.com/consumer-cameras-wob753-homeguard-outdoor-camera-720p-p-1420154.html
I ordered these from tekshop247 and just had an email to say they have cancelled my order as they don't have any (despite showing 30 in stock when I ordered).
Did anyone get theirs from eBuyer ? Any good ?
My order from Gameseek was cancelled. Some utter rubbish about failing QA when being picked, being sent back to supplier but supplier having no replacement stock. Suspect a bells up with pricing and nobody wants to sell at a significantly incorrect low price.
#22
I suspect there is a drop shipper somewhere that these guys all use who put the wrong price on or something over Christmas.
#23
AndyRoyd
My order from Gameseek was cancelled. Some utter rubbish about failing QA when being picked, being sent back to supplier but supplier having no replacement stock. Suspect a bells up with pricing and nobody wants to sell at a significantly incorrect low price.

Strange, my order with gameseek is still open and they claim they will have stock anytime now
#24
freestyle
AndyRoyd
My order from Gameseek was cancelled. Some utter rubbish about failing QA when being picked, being sent back to supplier but supplier having no replacement stock. Suspect a bells up with pricing and nobody wants to sell at a significantly incorrect low price.
Strange, my order with gameseek is still open and they claim they will have stock anytime now
I hope they fulfill your order. Would be interested in being kept updated, thanks.
#25
freestyle
AndyRoyd
My order from Gameseek was cancelled. Some utter rubbish about failing QA when being picked, being sent back to supplier but supplier having no replacement stock. Suspect a bells up with pricing and nobody wants to sell at a significantly incorrect low price.
Strange, my order with gameseek is still open and they claim they will have stock anytime now
Hey, it's been about a month since our previous posts. Did the camera arrive? Cheers.
#26
AndyRoyd
freestyle
AndyRoyd
My order from Gameseek was cancelled. Some utter rubbish about failing QA when being picked, being sent back to supplier but supplier having no replacement stock. Suspect a bells up with pricing and nobody wants to sell at a significantly incorrect low price.
Strange, my order with gameseek is still open and they claim they will have stock anytime now
Hey, it's been about a month since our previous posts. Did the camera arrive? Cheers.

Got fed up with them gaining interest on my money when they stopped having the decency to respond to contact so got a refund from paypal
#27
freestyle
AndyRoyd
freestyle
AndyRoyd
My order from Gameseek was cancelled. Some utter rubbish about failing QA when being picked, being sent back to supplier but supplier having no replacement stock. Suspect a bells up with pricing and nobody wants to sell at a significantly incorrect low price.
Strange, my order with gameseek is still open and they claim they will have stock anytime now
Hey, it's been about a month since our previous posts. Did the camera arrive? Cheers.
Got fed up with them gaining interest on my money when they stopped having the decency to respond to contact so got a refund from paypal
OK, thanks. I eventually bought a smilar unit at around £50 as mentioned in post 14 here, but for my low requirements I would have preferred the equally lower price of £30 from ebuyer.
#28
mrwhitelabel
Graham1979
mrwhitelabel
Be aware of data protection issues on domestic CCTV if using ptz...
For example....
ok well its more than data protection issues , as officially cctv for private use by an individual is not subject to the ICO requirements of data storage etc that commercial ones are if it just covers your property BUT
you also need to be aware that if your camera(s) captures images outside the confines of your of household, those images are subject to the DPA.
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/domestic-cctv-using-cctv-systems-on-your-property/domestic-cctv-using-cctv-systems-on-your-property
however ptz cameras open up the can of worms of harrassment and voyerism charges that can occur as a result of their missuse by being able to track people and zoom in to personal areas.
it depends on their fitting location, their field of view and how is likely to walk past that field of view and where you can zoom too. its a complex grey area, and more a be aware of what you do with it, rather than a dont do it.
as guidence

This document helps you to understand what you need to do if you are considering installing (or have already installed) a CCTV system on your property. A CCTV system includes the camera, storage, recording and all associated equipment.
1. Surveillance Camera Commissioner
The Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 introduced the regulation of public space surveillance cameras in England and Wales. As a result the surveillance camera code of practice (2013) was issued by the Secretary of State under section 30 of the act to ensure that the use of cameras in public places is regulated and only used in pursuit of a specified purpose. The code, which came into force on 12 August 2013, seeks to balance the need for cameras in public places with individuals’ right to privacy.
The code applies to the use of surveillance camera systems that operate in public places in England and Wales, regardless of whether or not there is any live viewing or recording of images or information or associated data. The role of the Surveillance Camera Commissioner (SCC) is to encourage compliance, review operations and provide advice about the code.
You can contact the SCC at [email protected]
2. Information Commissioner’s Office
The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) regulates and enforces the Data Protection Act (DPA) which covers images being recorded by CCTV cameras. Please note that in light of the Rynes judgment by the Court of Justice of the European Union, if your CCTV covers any areas beyond the boundaries of your property it will no longer be regarded as domestic processing and be exempt from the DPA. If you have any questions or complaints about the use of domestic CCTV, please contact the ICO at [email protected] or call 0303 123 1113.
3. General guidance
An individual has the right to protect their property and this can be done by using a CCTV system where it is necessary, such as a security measure. However, the Surveillance Camera Commissioner recommends that users of CCTV systems should operate them in a responsible way to respect the privacy of others.
A CCTV system to protect a domestic dwelling from acts of crime and anti-social behaviour is now commonplace. Although this seems a reasonable use, there have been a number of complaints to the police, ICO and the SCC from neighbours and other members of the public using pavements in the vicinity who believe that cameras are being used to spy on them and their families.
Below is a short set of considerations to guide you through steps for ensuring that your CCTV security system reduces the risk of intruding on the privacy of others, including neighbours.
3.1 Reasons for getting a CCTV system
Think about the following questions before getting a CCTV system:
why do I need CCTV?
could I use another means to protect my home, such as improved lighting?
what do I want my CCTV camera to view and record? (this could be the front door, a parking space, the back yard, a shed etc)
3.2 How your CCTV system affects others
It is important to consider the privacy of others while setting up your system. Ask yourself:
where will I position the CCTV to ensure minimal intrusion in to my neighbour’s and other people’s privacy?
will the range of the cameras overlook my neighbour’s property, pavements and other areas? (if so, consider ways to reduce intrusion such as using privacy filters)
how will my neighbours feel about my CCTV?
Issue is easily overcome by registering your household CCTV with the ICO they even have a new cheaper registration option for households at a cost of £35 a year and you address won't be displayed on the register unless you want it to be otherwise you can have an email address as contact information. Once you are registered you are covered under the data protection act and just have to process any request for access to footage. Should also cover you if your camera does cover any public roads/footpaths outside your boundry. https://ico.org.uk/registration/cctv

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