How Cool Is This Telescience Telescope - £12.50 Instore @ Tesco - HotUKDeals
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Have a close encounter with planets and stars with this Telescience telescope. The telescope has a glass lens and aluminium body. It features a diagonal mirror, erector lens and 3x Barlow lens. This telescope has a magnification of up to 375 times, a 50mm objective diameter and 500mm focal length. It comes with an aluminium tripod and star map.

Picked one up for a nephew's christmas present, lol
Not the best scope around but descent for a kid I'd think.
Loads still in the South Queensferry store.
Showing as £50 online but I'm sure these were around £25 to £30 before xmas.

This might be of use to any novice too

Free star gazing booklet from the BBC
http://www.hotukdeals.com/freebies/free-star-gazing-booklet-from-bbc-1102818

This may also help
http://www.stellarium.org/
- hawk299
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6 Likes #1
http://www.banguniverse.com/userfiles/image/patrick_moore3.jpg

Astoundingly Good Find Solar HeatAdded - Cold Voters Don't Know Their Pluto From Uranus :p !!!



Edited By: Boz on Dec 28, 2011 18:36: .
#2
Spiffing find!
#3
Boz
http://www.banguniverse.com/userfiles/image/patrick_moore3.jpg

Astoundingly Good Find !!!

lol
1 Like #4
Saw this is Kings Lynn Gaywood store today, was going to post about 1pm but decided not to, but I can confirm this is probably nationwide
#5
Aeschylus
Saw this is Kings Lynn Gaywood store today, was going to post about 1pm but decided not to, but I can confirm this is probably nationwide

Cheers Aeschylus, good to have it confirmed that it's in other stores.
1 Like #6
Excellent price but I think the description "close encounter with planets" is going a bit far. They'll still look little more than twinkling dots of light.
#7
This would be a fantastic piece of kit to look at the moon, but little else - an absolute bargain though.
1 Like #8
The moon landings were faked, this telescope would only prove this.

I remember looking at the moon as a child in 1947, and I didn't see a flag.
3 Likes #9
Boz

Astoundingly Good Find Solar HeatAdded - Cold Voters Don't Know Their Pluto From Uranus :p !!!



Rubbish, ones a dog and the other is what MP's speak out of!
2 Likes #10
"This telescope has a magnification of up to 375 times"

Nonsense. It would be unusable at this magnification, or even half that.

Not a bad price for a toy, but proper telescopes are never sold on the basis of these fantastic magnification claims. The aperture size is the important figure, and 50mm is too small to give the resolving power (and light gathering) needed to see detail at high magnifications. You get big, dim, fuzzy blobs. The bigger you make them, the fuzzier and dimmer they get.
#11
An Erector on a Telescope and for that reason i'm out X)
#12
LongPockets
"This telescope has a magnification of up to 375 times"

Nonsense. It would be unusable at this magnification, or even half that.

Not a bad price for a toy, but proper telescopes are never sold on the basis of these fantastic magnification claims. The aperture size is the important figure, and 50mm is too small to give the resolving power (and light gathering) needed to see detail at high magnifications. You get big, dim, fuzzy blobs. The bigger you make them, the fuzzier and dimmer they get.


as long as we can check out the hot neighbours in their lingerie who cares :p
#13
kylewalker
LongPockets
"This telescope has a magnification of up to 375 times"

Nonsense. It would be unusable at this magnification, or even half that.

Not a bad price for a toy, but proper telescopes are never sold on the basis of these fantastic magnification claims. The aperture size is the important figure, and 50mm is too small to give the resolving power (and light gathering) needed to see detail at high magnifications. You get big, dim, fuzzy blobs. The bigger you make them, the fuzzier and dimmer they get.


as long as we can check out the hot neighbours in their lingerie who cares :p


binoculars work better.. ;)
#14
Well it's not.
In fact it looks hot. oO
#15
nice deal, I'll look into it
1 Like #16
You had me at erector.
1 Like #17
You can buy a pair of binoculars with the same sized objective lens (ie. 2 of these telescopes) for not much more which will prove much more useful than this toy. This will gather dust and put a child off.

Binoculars are so much more versatile, they can be used much more than astronomical uses. I own a 102mm scope, have a passion for the subject yet get far better use out of the 50mm Binoculars that I own (I seen Venus through them tonight)

This is a toy, buy your child binoculars and they can upgrade to something useful if they still have an interest in the subject.
#18
GlentoranMark
You can buy a pair of binoculars with the same sized objective lens (ie. 2 of these telescopes) for not much more which will prove much more useful than this toy. This will gather dust and put a child off.

Binoculars are so much more versatile, they can be used much more than astronomical uses
I own a 102mm scope, have a passion for the subject yet get far better use out of the 50mm Binoculars that I own (I seen Venus through them tonight)

This is a toy, buy your child binoculars and they can upgrade to something useful if they still have an interest in the subject.


Filthy boy! jk ;)
#19
Bought this for my grandson this afternoon. He's only 11 months old but I always wanted one.
OK it's no Hubble, but for £12.50 it's a bargain.
#20
dsuk
The moon landings were faked, this telescope would only prove this.

I remember looking at the moon as a child in 1947, and I didn't see a flag.


1947? no wonder you couldnt see it! even if they didnt land on the moon I am sure they dont own a time machine meaning they could land there 22 years early!
#21
TrevC
Bought this for my grandson this afternoon. He's only 11 months old but I always wanted one.
OK it's no Hubble, but for £12.50 it's a bargain.


A telescope for a 11 month old ? oO

Edited By: topss on Dec 29, 2011 00:00
#22
topss
TrevC
Bought this for my grandson this afternoon. He's only 11 months old but I always wanted one.
OK it's no Hubble, but for £12.50 it's a bargain.


A telescope for a 11 month old ? oO


He's always wanted one, TBF.
1 Like #23
GlentoranMark
topss
TrevC
Bought this for my grandson this afternoon. He's only 11 months old but I always wanted one.
OK it's no Hubble, but for £12.50 it's a bargain.


A telescope for a 11 month old ? oO


He's always wanted one, TBF.


The tube from the middle of wrapping paper would suffice for an 11 month old ;)
#24
On a serious note, please don't buy this guys, it will end up a coathanger.
#25
This bit of plastic will put the user off astronomy. If you want to interest your child, look up your local astronomical society on Google. Most of them run free star parties where they will show you all the wonders of the sky with a decent telescope that actually makes it worth looking at.

Even for £12.50 all this product can achieve is to turn people off. Why bother?
#26
lcassey
dsuk
The moon landings were faked, this telescope would only prove this.

I remember looking at the moon as a child in 1947, and I didn't see a flag.


1947? no wonder you couldnt see it! even if they didnt land on the moon I am sure they dont own a time machine meaning they could land there 22 years early!


Wow. Thanks for the clarification and explanation of the joke.
#27
This is not cool, my songot one 2 years ago from his grandma, it lasted 2 weeks, cheap tacky plastic, struggles to even find the moon, he thought it was great during that time, but upset after, it went in the bin.

Please buy a pair of binos for the same money, you will see a whole lot more.

Kids think "wow a telescope" I can see the stars, the only thing ours saw was the wheelie bin.

Yes its cheaper than normal, no its dire.

Gun
#28
Maybe you should point it at the sky then an not at your wheelie bin. I think that might help. :-)
#29
TrevC
Bought this for my grandson this afternoon. He's only 11 months old but I always wanted one.
OK it's no Hubble, but for £12.50 it's a bargain.

Its only a bargain if it does what it syas on the tin and this wont
#30
This might be of use to any novice too

Free star gazing booklet from the BBC
http://www.hotukdeals.com/freebies/free-star-gazing-booklet-from-bbc-1102818

This may also help
http://www.stellarium.org/

Edited By: hawk299 on Dec 29, 2011 09:28
#31
Saintledger
kylewalker
LongPockets
"This telescope has a magnification of up to 375 times"

Nonsense. It would be unusable at this magnification, or even half that.

Not a bad price for a toy, but proper telescopes are never sold on the basis of these fantastic magnification claims. The aperture size is the important figure, and 50mm is too small to give the resolving power (and light gathering) needed to see detail at high magnifications. You get big, dim, fuzzy blobs. The bigger you make them, the fuzzier and dimmer they get.


as long as we can check out the hot neighbours in their lingerie who cares :p


binoculars work better.. ;)


noted ;)
#32
tripod 'bearing' of these are useless, they allow wobby when turning adjusting so very hard to fix on a star
#33
if you're serious about astronomy, then there were three podcasts on equipment for astronomers wanting to take photos at http://www.astronomycast.com/ a little while ago - search the page for astrophoto

they reckon you need to spend about £3000, and then only by buying used, to actually get started. they warn you that it's the sort of hobby where you can get ruin yourself financially.

there are links for each podcast to websites with some stunning photos done by amateurs
#34
dsuk
The moon landings were faked, this telescope would only prove this.

I remember looking at the moon as a child in 1947, and I didn't see a flag.


.... You looked 12yrs too early for the flag lol
#35
uzi148
Maybe you should point it at the sky then an not at your wheelie bin. I think that might help. :-)


Actually when we finally did point it at the whellie bin, it was so poor we couldnt even see that through it..TO LANDFILL AND BEYOND! (apart from the recyclable bits of course!)
#36
speculatrix
if you're serious about astronomy, then there were three podcasts on equipment for astronomers wanting to take photos at http://www.astronomycast.com/ a little while ago - search the page for astrophoto

they reckon you need to spend about £3000, and then only by buying used, to actually get started. they warn you that it's the sort of hobby where you can get ruin yourself financially.

there are links for each podcast to websites with some stunning photos done by amateurs


are you serious £3000? cmon, im pretty sure u dont have to spend more than £300 - £500 on a motorised goto telescope, or maybe i could be wrong, i live in deep city london
2 Likes #37
Astronomy can be an expensive hobby! You always want more!

I'm very light polluted myself and use my binoculars much more than my telescope. I spent 10 minutes last night looking at the Moon, Jupiter and Venus. My telescope would have taken 10 minutes to set up alone.

Buy your kids a pair of 10 x 50 binoculars and you will get much more use out of them even if your child keeps his interest in the subject. You can always buy him something bigger and more serious if he keeps the hobby going.

Optical quality has improved greatly and prices have dropped substantially since I first got into the subject. You can now buy something useable for just over £100. The skies the limit however (pun intended) when it comes to gear. A decent eyepiece can cost over £100 alone, add to that filters, webcam (if you want an easy way to take photo's), proper mount, software, hardware, a bigger scope etc and you get my drift.

Please don't buy this toy just because it looks good. You will get very little use out if it and maybe worst of all it will put you off the subject.

By buying binoculars you will make the right first step into astronomy.
#38
GlentoranMark
Astronomy can be an expensive hobby! You always want more!

I'm very light polluted myself and use my binoculars much more than my telescope. I spent 10 minutes last night looking at the Moon, Jupiter and Venus. My telescope would have taken 10 minutes to set up alone.

Buy your kids a pair of 10 x 50 binoculars and you will get much more use out of them even if your child keeps his interest in the subject. You can always buy him something bigger and more serious if he keeps the hobby going.

Optical quality has improved greatly and prices have dropped substantially since I first got into the subject. You can now buy something useable for just over £100. The skies the limit however (pun intended) when it comes to gear. A decent eyepiece can cost over £100 alone, add to that filters, webcam (if you want an easy way to take photo's), proper mount, software, hardware, a bigger scope etc and you get my drift.

Please don't buy this toy just because it looks good. You will get very little use out if it and maybe worst of all it will put you off the subject.

By buying binoculars you will make the right first step into astronomy.


true, im more interested in deep space stuff, im pretty sure u cant look at nebulas with a binoculars, as you would need steady hands, yes telescopes take long to set up, but on a good day u can see more with it in one day than you could see with a binoculars for years.
#39
rza89
speculatrix
if you're serious about astronomy, then there were three podcasts on equipment for astronomers wanting to take photos at http://www.astronomycast.com/ a little while ago - search the page for astrophoto

they reckon you need to spend about £3000, and then only by buying used, to actually get started. they warn you that it's the sort of hobby where you can get ruin yourself financially.

there are links for each podcast to websites with some stunning photos done by amateurs


are you serious £3000? cmon, im pretty sure u dont have to spend more than £300 - £500 on a motorised goto telescope, or maybe i could be wrong, i live in deep city london

I'd not bother m8.
The ambient light from London's lights will cut down on the ability of any 'scope.
Mind you, I'm no expert.
I've thought about astronmy but never took it up as no telescope that I could ever afford can match the ones the pro's use.
I'd think "Why produce pokey, low standard results when there are so many fantastic photos available to look at in books and online?".
Apart from discovering a passing body before anyone else I can't see the use.
Good luck to those engrossed in it but it's not for me, even though I have an interest.
#40
if you're serious about astronomy, then there were three podcasts on equipment for astronomers wanting to take photos at http://www.astronomycast.com/ a little while ago - search the page for astrophoto

they reckon you need to spend about £3000, and then only by buying used, to actually get started. they warn you that it's the sort of hobby where you can get ruin yourself financially.

there are links for each podcast to websites with some stunning photos done by amateurs


It's been noted several times on this thread that astronomy can be an expensive subject but it doesn't necessarily have to be. Real science can be done with the naked eye alone and you can contribute greatly to the scientific community by simply keeping records of your observations.

Estimating variable stars is one such way to do this. Stars like Betelgeuse in Orion vary in brightness and astronomers need data to understand what is happening. The more observations, the better the data and there are many naked eye stars that stars that are less well observed.

Weather and rarer aurorae observations can also help.

For the armchair observer you can help the community by going to http://www.galaxyzoo.org (or one of the many spin offs) and crunching the data with your naked eye. Two new planets have been announced recently by planetaryhunters.org that were found by people just like you and me. You don't have to have an honours degree and work for NASA to do real science.

I know there are others but thats all I can think of on the top of my head.

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