Intel Core i7-4790K 'Devils Canyon' CPU - £250.97 @ Dabs + 2% cashback - HotUKDeals
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Use code GIMME10 for £10 off.

No point me regurgitating all the technical blurb here. Anyone who will be interested in this deal already knows all about this new chip.

Hardly any retailers have these in stock yet and when they do get inventory they sell out incredibly fast.

If you are interested be quick!
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Comments/page:
#1
Right on time! Bought mine.
Have some heat!
#2
romulo
Right on time! Bought mine.
Have some heat!

Overclockers UK had some in stock earlier in the week. They were priced at £269.99+delivery and all went like hot cakes.

They have totally sold out of the 4790K chips now, but still have the 4690K (both boxed and OEM) if anyone fancies the i5 instead of the i7.

http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=CP-540-IN
http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=CP-542-IN

Edited By: ScoobyStoo on Jun 24, 2014 20:31
#3
this or the i5 4670k? for gaming purposes.
#4
belsibub
How long before they are down to the price of the 70k's?


When the demand at this price is exhausted. A month or two I would guess.
#5
ScoobyStoo
belsibub
How long before they are down to the price of the 70k's?

When the demand at this price is exhausted. A month or two I would guess.
Not worth a £30 premium v's performance increase surely?
3 Likes #6
Carlcsw2k
this or the i5 4670k? for gaming purposes.

Gaming the 4670k is all you need even the old i5 2500k are more then good enough still.
#7
I'm waiting for Amazon to list this, hopefully their price is lower. I'm waiting to this to put my build together. :) Anyway, heat - the best price I've been seeing is £257 @ Ebuyer
#8
F*ck it, couldn't resist. Ordered final two parts from dabs: this and MSI Z97 Gaming 5 :D
#9
belsibub
ScoobyStoo
belsibub
How long before they are down to the price of the 70k's?

When the demand at this price is exhausted. A month or two I would guess.
Not worth a £30 premium v's performance increase surely?

It really is if you plan to overclock. I don't want to OC but I will down the line.
#10
belsibub
ScoobyStoo
belsibub
How long before they are down to the price of the 70k's?

When the demand at this price is exhausted. A month or two I would guess.
Not worth a £30 premium v's performance increase surely?

All depends how the retail units overclock. The engineering samples that the tech sites reviewed weren't great overclockers.

Time to play the silicon lottery...
#11
Out of stock now. Knew they wouldn't last long.
#12
Hey ScoobyStoo, order with confidence, plenty more landing friday/monday!

Cheers
Dunc @ dabs.com
#13
DabsDotCom
Hey ScoobyStoo, order with confidence, plenty more landing friday/monday!

Cheers
Dunc @ dabs.com

Hi Dunc,

Is this still the case? I've had mine on pre-order with you since yesterday and your website is now saying 'More than 50 due in 5-7 days'??
#14
I've just bought one, back in stock now.
2 Likes #15
My one arrived yesterday. Just putting it through its paces today and have discovered that Intel have enabled VT-d and TSX on this chip. These were both disabled on the original unlocked Haswell chips.

I can't see many overclockers getting excited about virtualisation so I doubt VT-d will be a big deal. However, when Intel disabled TSX on the 4670K and 4770K it ruffled quite a few feathers.

Good to see they haven't crippled this chip at all. It's a proper flagship product now. Still runs hot but absolute killer performance.

Will start to push the overclock tomorrow. See how close to 5GHz I can get.

Edited By: ScoobyStoo on Jun 27, 2014 19:36
#16
Keep us updated what you manage (and your overclock settings). I hope it can at least reach 4.8Ghz. That's what I have my 2600k running at at the moment!
#17
ScoobyStoo, was yours from an L3 or L4 batch? Seems to be a mixture of older and newer chips around.
#18
bungler
ScoobyStoo, was yours from an L3 or L4 batch? Seems to be a mixture of older and newer chips around.


Batch number on mine is L418C134
#19
ScoobyStoo
bungler
ScoobyStoo, was yours from an L3 or L4 batch? Seems to be a mixture of older and newer chips around.

Batch number on mine is L418C134

Thanks mate, that's one of the newer ones.
#20
Been waiting for a new system, i5 or i7 hmmmm... Not sure, want this machine to last a few years and now they have VT-d on K chips I don't need to look at Xeons.
#21
Can't get my 4790K over 4.6GHz stable on air cooling. Devil's Canyon is just as much a lottery for overclocking as Haswell was. Great stock performance though.

Edited By: Easy2BCheesy on Jun 30, 2014 10:11
#22
Easy2BCheesy
Can't get my 4790K over 4.6GHz stable on air cooling. Devil's Canyon is just as much a lottery for overclocking as Haswell was. Great stock performance though.

Heat limited or hit the voltage wall?
#23
How's the DSR returns process for this company?
#24
smsmasters
How's the DSR returns process for this company?

Same as all the other big retailers. However, don't for a minute think that they are going to let you buy 10, test them all, cherry pick the best overclocker and then return the others.
#25
ScoobyStoo
smsmasters
How's the DSR returns process for this company?

Same as all the other big retailers. However, don't for a minute think that they are going to let you buy 10, test them all, cherry pick the best overclocker and then return the others.

But they have to, legally.
8 Likes #26
darren01021988
ScoobyStoo
smsmasters
How's the DSR returns process for this company?

Same as all the other big retailers. However, don't for a minute think that they are going to let you buy 10, test them all, cherry pick the best overclocker and then return the others.

But they have to, legally.

Incorrect.

Firstly, the Distance Selling Regulations have now been replaced with the Consumer Contracts Regulations as of 13th June 2014.

"A deduction can be made if the value of the goods has been reduced as a result of a customer handling the goods more than was necessary.

The extent to which a customer can handle the goods is the same as it would be if you were assessing them in a shop."


If you were assessing a boxed CPU in a shop you would not be allowed to break the seal to inspect the CPU. A broken Intel seal means that the item cannot be resold as new. Any hardware retailer knows people attempt to do this and they are on the watch for it.

Of course, you could buy OEM chips from a tray to avoid breaking any seal, but the vast majority of those have already been assessed by the retailers themselves and any good overclockers removed for their own builds. Hence why those in the know pay the extra tenner for boxed products (that and the extended warranty).

I have to be honest, this has boiled my p*ss somewhat. What makes people think they are so special as to be entitled to cherry pick a golden chip at the expense of everyone else? Pay your money and play the silicon lottery like the rest of us.

Edited By: ScoobyStoo on Jun 30, 2014 12:18
#27
GIMME10 voucher no longer valid
#28
I pre-ordered this from OC and have had it about a week. It sits happily at just under 4.7 at 70 degrees when running at 100%. Cooling is a Noctura NH D14 sink/fan in a Fractal Design XL case.
#29
ScoobyStoo
Easy2BCheesy
Can't get my 4790K over 4.6GHz stable on air cooling. Devil's Canyon is just as much a lottery for overclocking as Haswell was. Great stock performance though.

Heat limited or hit the voltage wall?

Heat. Perfectly fine at 1.25v and stable at 4.6GHz, but temps zoom into the 80s as we hit 1.3v. To be honest, the extra few hundred MHz don't justify the amount of money I'd need to spend on a new cooler and I really doubt I'd get 5GHz based on what I've seen so far.
#30
ScoobyStoo
darren01021988
ScoobyStoo
smsmasters
How's the DSR returns process for this company?

Same as all the other big retailers. However, don't for a minute think that they are going to let you buy 10, test them all, cherry pick the best overclocker and then return the others.

But they have to, legally.

Incorrect.

Firstly, the Distance Selling Regulations have now been replaced with the Consumer Contracts Regulations as of 13th June 2014.

"A deduction can be made if the value of the goods has been reduced as a result of a customer handling the goods more than was necessary.

The extent to which a customer can handle the goods is the same as it would be if you were assessing them in a shop."


If you were assessing a boxed CPU in a shop you would not be allowed to break the seal to inspect the CPU. A broken Intel seal means that the item cannot be resold as new. Any hardware retailer knows people attempt to do this and they are on the watch for it.

Of course, you could buy OEM chips from a tray to avoid breaking any seal, but the vast majority of those have already been assessed by the retailers themselves and any good overclockers removed for their own builds. Hence why those in the know pay the extra tenner for boxed products (that and the extended warranty).

I have to be honest, this has boiled my p*ss somewhat. What makes people think they are so special as to be entitled to cherry pick a golden chip at the expense of everyone else? Pay your money and play the silicon lottery like the rest of us.
id love you to point me to that exact provision under the consumer protection regs.

ill give you the site i would refer to:-

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2000/2334/contents/made

I cant see anything about this under the section entitled "Recovery of sums paid by or on behalf of the consumer on cancellation, and return of security"
#31
From 13 June 2014 the Consumer Contracts Regulations, which implement the Consumer Rights Directive in UK law, come into effect.

The regulations apply to items bought online, at a distance, or away from a trader's premises (for example, at home or at work).

They replace the Distance Selling Regulations and Doorstep Selling Regulations. They also make it an obligation for traders to give consumers certain information.
#32
doodoodoo
From 13 June 2014 the Consumer Contracts Regulations, which implement the Consumer Rights Directive in UK law, come into effect.

The regulations apply to items bought online, at a distance, or away from a trader's premises (for example, at home or at work).

They replace the Distance Selling Regulations and Doorstep Selling Regulations. They also make it an obligation for traders to give consumers certain information.
but that doesn't appear to address what I couldn't find in the regulations which one user claimed allowed a seller to deduct money from a refund.
#33
bouncy99
but that doesn't appear to address what I couldn't find in the regulations which one user claimed allowed a seller to deduct money from a refund.

When in doubt about any legalisation it's best to go directly to the Statutory Instrument itself.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/265898/consumer-contracts-information-cancellation-and-additional-payments-regulations-2013.pdf

Regulation 34(9) is the relevant one here. It's on page 16.

"If (in the case of a sales contract) the value of the goods is diminished by any amount as a
result of handling of the goods by the consumer beyond what is necessary to establish the nature,
characteristics and functioning of the goods, the trader may recover that amount from the
consumer, up to the contract price."


The operational nature, characteristics and functioning of a CPU can all be established without opening the box (e.g. the stock frequencies, required socket etc.). All the K designation means is that the CPU multiplier is unlocked. It makes no guarantee about overclocking characteristics. You could conceivably buy an unlocked chip which couldn't be overclocked beyond stock settings and you wouldn't have any grounds for formal complaint. The chip would be functioning to spec. Obviously you'd have to be monumentally unlucky for that to happen though.

The CCR weren't just put in place to enhance buyers’ rights. They were also drafted to amend some holes in the DSR which allowed buyers to abuse suppliers. Cases exactly such as the example here of a buyer cherry picking a CPU at the direct expense of the supplier.
#34
markinoxon
I pre-ordered this from OC and have had it about a week. It sits happily at just under 4.7 at 70 degrees when running at 100%. Cooling is a Noctura NH D14 sink/fan in a Fractal Design XL case.

What are your temps when running Prime95 FFS? Mine are just huge.
#35
ScoobyStoo
bouncy99
but that doesn't appear to address what I couldn't find in the regulations which one user claimed allowed a seller to deduct money from a refund.

When in doubt about any legalisation it's best to go directly to the Statutory Instrument itself.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/265898/consumer-contracts-information-cancellation-and-additional-payments-regulations-2013.pdf

Regulation 34(9) is the relevant one here. It's on page 16.

"If (in the case of a sales contract) the value of the goods is diminished by any amount as a
result of handling of the goods by the consumer beyond what is necessary to establish the nature,
characteristics and functioning of the goods, the trader may recover that amount from the
consumer, up to the contract price."


The operational nature, characteristics and functioning of a CPU can all be established without opening the box (e.g. the stock frequencies, required socket etc.). All the K designation means is that the CPU multiplier is unlocked. It makes no guarantee about overclocking characteristics. You could conceivably buy an unlocked chip which couldn't be overclocked beyond stock settings and you wouldn't have any grounds for formal complaint. The chip would be functioning to spec. Obviously you'd have to be monumentally unlucky for that to happen though.

The CCR weren't just put in place to enhance buyers’ rights. They were also drafted to amend some holes in the DSR which allowed buyers to abuse suppliers. Cases exactly such as the example here of a buyer cherry picking a CPU at the direct expense of the supplier.
it look slike the one i referred you to dates back to 2000, original dsr i guess.
#36
SilkySean
Keep us updated what you manage (and your overclock settings). I hope it can at least reach 4.8Ghz. That's what I have my 2600k running at at the moment!

Completed my 24/7 overclock.

Best I could get out of it was:

Core: 4625MHz (125 x 37) at 1.28V
Cache: 4500MHz (125 x 36) at 1.28V

Couldn't push it to do 4.7GHz in any configuration, even with silly voltages.

Pretty run of the mill overclock for this chip really. From looking at the numbers on various sites it appears nearly all 4790Ks will push to 4.5GHz, most will push to 4.6GHz, hardly any will go to 4.7GHz unless you are lucky or use voltages so high the chip is likely to degrade.

Having said that the IMC on these chips is fantastic. It can push my memory sticks right to their limit even at this overclock.


Edited By: ScoobyStoo on Jul 04, 2014 09:48
#37
I'm still conducting real world tests, but so far I seem to be stable at 4.7Ghz at 1.26V (47 x 100), temps hit 85 degrees though, which is a little strange. I'm going to resit my cooler with some better thermal paste to see if I can get the temps down!!!
#38
SilkySean
I'm still conducting real world tests, but so far I seem to be stable at 4.7Ghz at 1.26V (47 x 100), temps hit 85 degrees though, which is a little strange. I'm going to resit my cooler with some better thermal paste to see if I can get the temps down!!!

Which stress tests are yielding the high temps? Remember that the IVR on the chip will automatically bump voltages for AVX instructions. Prime95 was updated in May to use the AVX2 instruction set. As a result if I run short FFTs which all fit in the cache (no processing pauses for RAM access) my temps instantly hit 100C and I start thermal throttling.

All in all a great upgrade for me (came to the 4790K from an old first gen core chip). However, it will be interesting to see how the unlocked Broadwell SKUs overclock when they are released next year. Might upgrade my chip if they perform better.
#39
I've stress tested with Intel Extreme Tuning Utility, AIDA64 and Prime95 (blend test) at 4.7Ghz, 1.260v, all stable. Although Prime95 is not recommended for Haswell. Been playing CS:GO and DayZ all night and they've been fine (CS:GO BSOD's with 1.25v or less).

Temps still hitting 85 every time on stress tests though. 4.8Ghz is impossible without hitting 95. Short FFT's on Prime also put me into the 100's. I've set cache ratio to 44 @ 1.18v, CPU Input @ 1.9v, still can't get the temps down.

I'm blaming my thermal paste at the moment for the high temps at low voltages. I slapped it on rather than using the pea method, so probably have lots of air bubbles. I'm going to take it off, clean everything properly and apply some IC Diamond paste using the pea method. Hopefully that'll put me under 80 degrees and I might even attempt 4.8Ghz again. I had it stable at 1.35v but it was just too damn hot.



Edited By: SilkySean on Jul 07, 2014 02:56
#40
SilkySean
I've stress tested with Intel Extreme Tuning Utility, AIDA64 and Prime95 (blend test) at 4.7Ghz, 1.260v, all stable. Although Prime95 is not recommended for Haswell. Been playing CS:GO and DayZ all night and they've been fine (CS:GO BSOD's with 1.25v or less).

Temps still hitting 85 every time on stress tests though. 4.8Ghz is impossible without hitting 95. Short FFT's on Prime also put me into the 100's. I've set cache ratio to 44 @ 1.18v, CPU Input @ 1.9v, still can't get the temps down.

I'm blaming my thermal paste at the moment for the high temps at low voltages. I slapped it on rather than using the pea method, so probably have lots of air bubbles. I'm going to take it off, clean everything properly and apply some IC Diamond paste using the pea method. Hopefully that'll put me under 80 degrees and I might even attempt 4.8Ghz again. I had it stable at 1.35v but it was just too damn hot.

I didn't even try my chip above 1.3V. I will probably hang onto it for a few years and I don't want excessive voltage to degrade its 24/7 performance. No point pushing hard for an extra 100MHz now, only for the chip to degrade in 3 months time to the point where I have to drop the overclock.

If you can run your cores at 4.7GHz at 1.26V and cache at 4.4GHz at 1.18V then you have a good chip. Those numbers are well above the average. Congrats.

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