Jessops 800-80 Astronomical Telescope £39.95 at Jessops - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit
Was researching a camera and came across this telescope reduced to less than half price!

Done a search on the site and this is the cheapest this models ever been.

cashback and quidco should take a few more pounds off

Possibly a good present for a budding astronaut?
More From Jessops:
×
Get the Hottest Deals Daily
Stay informed. Once a day, we'll send you the deals our members voted as the best.
Failed
BurnBabyBurn Avatar
4y, 11m agoFound 4 years, 11 months ago
Options

All Comments

(64) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
Page:
#1
http://www.jessops.com/ce-images/PRODUCT/PRODUCT_ENLARGED/AJESSBS705139102_001.jpg

http://www.jessops.com/ce-images/PRODUCT/PRODUCT_ENLARGED/AJESSBS705139102.jpg
2 Likes #2
Maybe better with a Skywatcher Heritage 76mm or Celestron firstscope for a few pounds more.
#3
80mm would be a good size for a beginner's refractor, but a reflector needs a larger aperture, at least 105 or 115. The altazimuth mount will prove to be a bit awkward too, but it looks like it has a modern "red dot" type finder scope, which is a plus.
#4
I really want a telescope but have no knowledge at all... Any recommendations? Will this be ok for a complete doofus?
1 Like #5
kevola76
I really want a telescope but have no knowledge at all... Any recommendations? Will this be ok for a complete doofus?


There is a ton of information for beginners on the web. Whatever you end up buying, do a bit of surfing first. I know people who have bought quite good telescopes but were unable to make much use of them because they didn't "gen up" on the subject first. In the old days, youngsters used to hang around with others, sharing instruments, for months or years before they could afford their own (or even make them themselves) so when the time came, they knew what they were doing.

Edited By: LongPockets on Jan 02, 2012 00:07: p
5 Likes #6
Get a good pair of binoculars for this price instead.
#7
Another vote for a pair of bins first. No carrying heavy and fragile equipment about, no set up time and no learning curve except for the night sky you are looking at.

I bought these

7dayshop 10x50

They have gone up to £18 from the £15 I paid just a few months ago, but for that price they are still a good buy. Lovely clear views - you can see all 4 of Jupiter's Gallilean moons with these.

Lidl occasionally do the same sort of deal and their bins get good reviews too.

Certainly cheaper than shelling out on a scope straight away, and if you want a more stable viewing experience then a cheapish tripod and a binocular mount (also available from 7dayshop) will improve things. Or you could lean on an upturned broom.
#8
Thanks for the advice :)
#9
Wish i knew more about telescopes to pick up something like this! I've heard that it's better to pick up a pair of good binoculars first.

Still at less thank half price this has go to be hot!
#10
I just got this telescope for christmas and this was my first ever one. But instead of zooming in it is zooming out. I am a noob to all this so any suggestions would be appreciated. And not its not the wrong way round lol it is set up correctly from manual.
#11
DO NOT BUY THIS I WAS TRYING TO ADJUST THE ANGLE OF THE TELESCOPE AND THE BAR SNAPPED IN HALF. SAVE YOUR MONEY AND BUY ANOTHER ONE.
#12
Just change my mind now i have found the moon lol. Its good for the price BUT it is very easy to break.
1 Like #13
callumd94
Just change my mind now i have found the moon lol. Its good for the price BUT it is very easy to break.


Ha ha, you should have asked me and not wasted your time looking for it, its in the sky X)
#14
I bought this before christmas and took it back - it was better to see with the naked eye. Waste of money IMO.
#15
callumd94
I just got this telescope for christmas and this was my first ever one. But instead of zooming in it is zooming out. I am a noob to all this so any suggestions would be appreciated. And not its not the wrong way round lol it is set up correctly from manual.


My advice, take it back and swap it for some binoculars like I did :-)
#16
Great thread - I've also been reading up on astronomy after getting the 'Philip's Atlas of the Universe' by Patrick Moore a few months back I've always wanted to get into star gazing (or at least get a basic understanding of things) but never had the willpower.

Was amazed to find out one of them was actually Jupiter over xmas (which I only knew because my brother had an iPhone app!).

Particular thanks to deebstermac - went for those cheap binoculars to start off!
#17
I'm in the same predicament - I want to get into astronomy - have had a passing interest for years but now the kids have moved out and I have more time (and money) on my hands I am going to get into this more- but like you unsure what scope to get. The first thing to do as has been mentioned is swat up on things - http://stargazerslounge.com this is a good start - get yourself registered (its free) and do some research - there's loads of very helpful and friendly people in the forums her that will give you good advice before you make your first leap.

Hope it helps and good luck - personally I would not go for the telescope in the thread above but we all have our budget constraints and personal requirements.
2 Likes #18
The best advice I can give wether you buy a small scope or binoculars is to buy a book called "turn left at orion". It's a fantastic book and will get even the novice finding nebulaes in minutes.
#19
thc
The best advice I can give wether you buy a small scope or binoculars is to buy a book called "turn left at orion". It's a fantastic book and will get even the novice finding nebulaes in minutes.


Just to endorse what THC says above- just waiting for this book to be delivered by Amazon but its pretty much universally praised on any of the astronomy forums I've looked at so far.
#20
Or why not just buy one for a few hundred quid more that automagically goes to interesting things:

http://www.f1telescopes.co.uk/shop.php?id=648&level=&name=Celestron%20NexStar%206%20(XLT)%20SE
suspended#21
My daughter (age 6) is fascinated by space ... so I was looking to get something so she use. I hear what everyone is saying about getting decent binoculars, but she'll struggle to find what she's looking for ... the idea that I could set something up and fix it at a point in the sky for her to look at is appealing. Am I wasting my time looking for something around the £50 mark? Any advice greatly appreciated.
7 Likes #22
Telescopes under £200+ are a waste of time. Often plastic lenses and mounts that are so wobbly you will not be able to point them accurately enough. Frequently these cheap scopes are marketed on the basis of '500x' magnification, when even a £2500 professional instrument like a 10" Meade will struggle to show a clear image at that magnification. I am guessing the 800 in the title refers to a supposed max magnification; such statements should be banned under the Trade Descriptions Act on small scopes as they are lies, damn lies etc. They also take a lot of work setting up and aligning outside which is not want you want as a total novice trying to learn.

I started astronomy 35 years ago with a pair of 7x50 binoculars. Get a sun lounger setup in the garden and lay down to use them; much more stable than standing up or leaning against a wall. Sweep Orion in the southern sky with them and enjoy the wider field and stable view that you will get over a telescope.

Do not be tempted to go too high with the binocular magnification. The first number is the mag, the second is the field of view. As the first increase, the second decreases generally unless you spend serious money. 7x50 is about the lowest power wise, 10x50 is good. Beware of stuff where the second number is much below 50 as this will reduce the field of view and you won't be able to appreciate some of the larger objects.

A pair of these will show you the moons of Jupiter easily (with a steady hand), numerous star clusters and nebula and amazing '3d' views of the moon. Another vote also for 'Turn left at Orion', although I learned with an older book called 'A New Way to See the Stars' which is also fantastic.

Hope this helps
1 Like #23
ZedZed
My daughter (age 6) is fascinated by space ... so I was looking to get something so she use. I hear what everyone is saying about getting decent binoculars, but she'll struggle to find what she's looking for ..


As an almost-beginner, inspired by a child of similar age, here's what I did, for around £50.

First, a pair of good binoculars; I missed the Lidl deal so went to http://www.strathspey.co.uk/
(they have a great buyer's guide too). I also bought a tripod mounting bracket.
Second, from Amazon a 'Hama Star 63 Tripod' (mentioned on HUKD of course!) for under £15.

The tripod extends so tall that a child can look up into the binoculars quite successfully, and holds a place well.

That tripod doesn't turn too smoothly so there's some fiddling around involved, but for the price it's great.
1 Like #24
ZedZed
My daughter (age 6) is fascinated by space ... so I was looking to get something so she use. I hear what everyone is saying about getting decent binoculars, but she'll struggle to find what she's looking for ... the idea that I could set something up and fix it at a point in the sky for her to look at is appealing. Am I wasting my time looking for something around the £50 mark? Any advice greatly appreciated.


I'd suggest something like this and a tripod: http://www.amazon.com/Celestron-SkyMaster-Binoculars-Tripod-Adapter/dp/B00008Y0VN?SubscriptionId=AKIAILSHYYTFIVPWUY6Q&tag=duckduckgo-r-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B00008Y0VN

A friend introduced me to stargazing with a similar set-up ages ago (military grade binoculars and a military telescope not meant for stargazing). But now you have decent intro Celestrons so I don't know what's the saner route.
#25
I started looking for a telescope a few months ago, to begin with. I also found that any experienced astronomer would say the same, and a lot of people who buy under £100 scopes regret it, I saw a site with a handful of scopes and example images of the moon from the scopes, and the cheapest one that I would be happy with was around the £160 mark for a clear image of the moon - and that's a pretty close object, Jupiter's moons would still be small and blurry through them. I'm going to pick up some binoculars instead for around £20, and use those while I save up for a better scope, no point paying £100+ for something as good as £20 :)

(the offer is still pretty good though for it being a scope, shame it's a jessops own brand though)

khrest
Telescopes under £200+ are a waste of time. Often plastic lenses and mounts that are so wobbly you will not be able to point them accurately enough. Frequently these cheap scopes are marketed on the basis of '500x' magnification, when even a £2500 professional instrument like a 10" Meade will struggle to show a clear image at that magnification. I am guessing the 800 in the title refers to a supposed max magnification; such statements should be banned under the Trade Descriptions Act on small scopes as they are lies, damn lies etc. They also take a lot of work setting up and aligning outside which is not want you want as a total novice trying to learn.

I started astronomy 35 years ago with a pair of 7x50 binoculars. Get a sun lounger setup in the garden and lay down to use them; much more stable than standing up or leaning against a wall. Sweep Orion in the southern sky with them and enjoy the wider field and stable view that you will get over a telescope.

Do not be tempted to go too high with the binocular magnification. The first number is the mag, the second is the field of view. As the first increase, the second decreases generally unless you spend serious money. 7x50 is about the lowest power wise, 10x50 is good. Beware of stuff where the second number is much below 50 as this will reduce the field of view and you won't be able to appreciate some of the larger objects.

A pair of these will show you the moons of Jupiter easily (with a steady hand), numerous star clusters and nebula and amazing '3d' views of the moon. Another vote also for 'Turn left at Orion', although I learned with an older book called 'A New Way to See the Stars' which is also fantastic.

Hope this helps
#26
i'm so glad i subscribed to this thread now.... there has been some excellent advice in here, especially khrest!


however, i think i might complicate and blow things wide open in here with the question i'm about to ask.....

as someone who loves star gazing with my own eyes and does a lot of photography, i'd love to combine my two passions. I've photographed the moon before with a 300mm lens but once cropped in it starts to look less impressive. :(

i'm more than happy to buy a pair of bino's to start me off but i'm guessing there's no way to attach a camera to them to photograph through.

so here's the question, what would be a good scope to photograph through and how easy is it to do?



rilian

As an almost-beginner, inspired by a child of similar age, here's what I did, for around £50.

First, a pair of good binoculars; I missed the Lidl deal so went to http://www.strathspey.co.uk/
(they have a great buyer's guide too). I also bought a tripod mounting bracket.
Second, from Amazon a 'Hama Star 63 Tripod' (mentioned on HUKD of course!) for under £15.



what was the lidl deal please and how did you attach the bino's to the tripod? was it just the standard screw thread on the tripod head straight onto them, or did u have to buy an adapter?
#27
Some really good information here.

Thanks to all who have taken the time to post. :)
#28
I'm not sure of any that you 'attach' its a process of point the scope in the right place, and point the camera into the eyepiece of the scope and take a picture, without moving the scope. Most scopes will work fine doing this as far as I know - I will try and find the site I saw where someone does just that.

cookie_monster

i'm more than happy to buy a pair of bino's to start me off but i'm guessing there's no way to attach a camera to them to photograph through.

so here's the question, what would be a good scope to photograph through and how easy is it to do?
1 Like #29
check out the skywatcher infinity 76p. its really cool, different, easy to use and very well reviewed. We were using ours last night to look at jupiter's moons. you can pick these up for the same price. and oh yeah, it looks like a penguin!
#30
khrest
Telescopes under £200+ are a waste of time. Often plastic lenses and mounts that are so wobbly you will not be able to point them accurately enough. Frequently these cheap scopes are marketed on the basis of '500x' magnification, when even a £2500 professional instrument like a 10" Meade will struggle to show a clear image at that magnification. I am guessing the 800 in the title refers to a supposed max magnification; such statements should be banned under the Trade Descriptions Act on small scopes as they are lies, damn lies etc. They also take a lot of work setting up and aligning outside which is not want you want as a total novice trying to learn.

The 800 refers to the length of the scope

I have the big brother of this - the 1100/110 which i got for Christmas. It's available for £90 I think, which is a steal - In the very limited time i've had to use it (thanks to the weather) here is my opinion.

Very easy to set up, after a few goes I can now get set up in a couple of minutes. It'd big but not too heavy and more stable than I thought it would be (especially after reading some reviews). I've had brilliant images of the moon, and Jupiter & it's moons so far. It's basically a no frills telescope - none of the gagetry to track or find stars for you.

I suspect better eyepieces may be a decent investment, but the supplied ones are fine to get you started. I was a bit dissapointed by the tripod / mount as it wasn't very smooth to turn, so when i tried to track anything i usually lost it, but then i realised it was my fault as i had tightened everything too much and not got the counterweights quite right - so it's now much better. My first attempt to look at Jupiter didnt go too well, very blurry images, so i was again a bit dissapointed but it must have been atmospheric interference (or just general incompetance on my part!) as when I looked again last night it was great, very clear.

Has made my 4yr old son go "wow" several times, which is pretty good! Have tried binos before, which were great but I think this is a step up (though I have the larger scope than the one in this deal)
#31
khrest
Telescopes under £200+ are a waste of time.

+1 ..i learned this after much research and had to up my budget.

Only problem for me is that light pollution is obscene as the local university keep its sports floodlights on every night, but at least drunks can stagger past at 4am and see a nice big green field to pee on.
#32
[quote=cookie_monster]
so here's the question, what would be a good scope to photograph through and how easy is it to do?
[quote=rilian]

Any scope that you are happy with the images you get when looking with your eyes will be good for astro photography.

Assuming you have a dslr you'll need a t-ring or t2-ring for your camera, then a camera adapter for your scope. The t-ring attaches to your camera as a lens would, then the adapter attached to that on one end, and the scope on the other.

That said - I have an HTC desire phone, and the lens on the phone camerea sits nicely in the eyepiece of my scope just help up against it, so i've taken some cracking pictures of the moon that way!
#33
This is a brilliant buy.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Celestron-31045-Astromaster-130EQ/dp/B000MLL6RS
http://www.telescopereviews.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/celestron-astromaster-130eq-telescope.jpg

Edited By: MikeT on Jan 03, 2012 11:28
#34
here's some great software, free interactive map of the sky, www.stellarium.org

problem with low budget telescopes is folks find they don't reach there expectations so give up, binoculars are a good place to start, and they can always be handy, if you get serious bigger binoculars for astro exist at less than £100.

CookieMonster - camera on a telescope is more than possible (or camera with telephoto lens), moon & planets on a simple scope, wide shots of the night sky etc. Deep space close up's are difficult without a very good tracking (not just goto) mount for a telescope. gets to be an expensive hobby. As stevetynant said www.stargazerslounge.com is worth looking at.

BBC have another stargazing evening in a couple of weeks
#35
jackbauer77
My first attempt to look at Jupiter didnt go too well, very blurry images, so i was again a bit dissapointed but it must have been atmospheric interference (or just general incompetance on my part!) as when I looked again last night it was great, very clear.


when you say jupiter was very clear, how clear are we talking? are we talking a clear faint dot or can you see it and it's bands quite clearly? :)



jackbauer77
[quote=cookie_monster]
so here's the question, what would be a good scope to photograph through and how easy is it to do?
[quote=rilian]

Any scope that you are happy with the images you get when looking with your eyes will be good for astro photography.

Assuming you have a dslr you'll need a t-ring or t2-ring for your camera, then a camera adapter for your scope. The t-ring attaches to your camera as a lens would, then the adapter attached to that on one end, and the scope on the other.

That said - I have an HTC desire phone, and the lens on the phone camerea sits nicely in the eyepiece of my scope just help up against it, so i've taken some cracking pictures of the moon that way!


yes a dslr and yes, i've heard a t-ring mention before :) is the adapter from the t-ring to the scope a generic thing or is it scope specific?

thats actually a really really good idea! :D i've got a galaxy S2 and the pictures are amazing from it. i'd definitely try that or my canon point and shoot up against the eye piece :)


i think i'll also be investing in a copy of Turn left at Orion which i've heard several good things about before :)
#36
b6bloke
This is a brilliant buy.

[url=http%253A%252F%252Fwww.amazon.co.uk%252FCelestron-31045-Astromaster-130EQ%252Fdp%252FB000MLL6RS]http://www.amazon.co.uk/Celestron-31045-Astromaster-130EQ/dp/B000MLL6RS[/url]
http://www.telescopereviews.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/celestron-astromaster-130eq-telescope.jpg

can you elaborate b6?


mickjack
here's some great software, free interactive map of the sky, www.stellarium.org

problem with low budget telescopes is folks find they don't reach there expectations so give up, binoculars are a good place to start, and they can always be handy, if you get serious bigger binoculars for astro exist at less than £100.

CookieMonster - camera on a telescope is more than possible (or camera with telephoto lens), moon & planets on a simple scope, wide shots of the night sky etc. Deep space close up's are difficult without a very good tracking (not just goto) mount for a telescope. gets to be an expensive hobby. As stevetynant said www.stargazerslounge.com is worth looking at.

BBC have another stargazing evening in a couple of weeks

thank you :)
#37
I just order one for Collection at Leicester store. After placing order, few minutes later I received telephone from Jessops saying that the item you have order is the last one and its damaged so we can't sell that.
Thanks for letting me know.
#38
or even this http://www.amazon.co.uk/Skywatcher-HERITAGE-130P-FlexTubeTM-Parabolic-Dobsonian/dp/B005KIXM66/ref=sr_1_3?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1325590849&sr=1-3

If you keep an eye on e-bay you can pick up a very good telescope for pennies and a lot of them are pick up only so that limits the bidders.
#39
[quote=cookie_monster]
when you say jupiter was very clear, how clear are we talking? are we talking a clear faint dot or can you see it and it's bands quite clearly? :)

Better than a faint dot, but not fine detail of the bands - basically i could tell there were bands, so maybe 'very clear' was overselling it a bit! At worst it was a very bright big dot ;-)
If you have a look at the last image at the bottom of the page - this is very similar to the best i've seen of Jupiter so far - http://www.universetoday.com/89397/whats-that-very-bright-star-is-it-the-planet-jupiter/

All my viewing has been done from my driveway so far - i'm hoping a trip out of town and up some dark hills will produce some better results.
#40
"Any scope that you are happy with the images you get when looking with your eyes will be good for astro photography."

Not from what I've read - but it might be helpful if someone with real knowledge of this subject could comment (I'm a complete newb myself so don't want to confuse things for fellow starters)

If someone with a better knowledge of astronomy would like to comment I'd be eternally grateful but this is what I've picked up based on what I've read so far in my search for a new scope and are the general guidelines I'm using in my search.

Telescopes can be reflectors or refractors - one is better suited for deep space objects - one is better for planetary observations.

If possible and budget allows you should be looking for one with at least 150mm primary mirror diameter for the light gathering properties it has.

The mount seems to be nearly as important as the scope itself.

You can't photograph Deep Space Objects on a long exposure without a motorised mount.

Go to Telescopes use GPS and can be programmed to be directed at whatever star or constellation is in its database but are more expensive

Portability is important - its no good getting a scope with a huge mirror and mount if the effort it takes to set it up stops you from using it - the best scope is the one you use not the one left in the spare bedroom.

Anyone else like to correct me or give some more advice I'd be grateful - seems like theres a lot of us on here on the verge of taking up this fascinating hobby.

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Top of Page
Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!