Jessops 800-80 Astronomical Telescope £39 save £60 - collect instore or £3.99 delivery - HotUKDeals
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Another cheap starter telescope!
Additional 4% Topcashback too.
An Ideal starter scope for any budding astronomer, everything required to open up the fantastic world of astronomy and bring the delights of space observation down to earth. Furthermore, the unit is supplied part assembled making the assembly process a breeze.

Specification:

* 800mm focal length
* 80mm objective diameter
* Focal ratio: F/10
* 40x Minimum magnification
* 399x Maximum magnification



Box Contents:

* Reflector telescope
* 6mm, 12.5mm and 20mm eyepieces
* Electronic red dot finder scope (battery included)
* 3x Barlow lens
* Aluminium tripod
* Altitude slow-motion adjustment bar
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Comments/page:
#1
http://www.jessops.com/ce-images/PRODUCT/PRODUCT_LARGE/AJESSBS705139102_001.jpg
http://www.jessops.com/ce-images/PRODUCT/PRODUCT_ENLARGED/AJESSBS705139102.jpg
#2
good deal, kids were on about wanting a telescope only last week to see how the filming of transformers 3 is going, on the moon.
1 Like #3
i hate you goose, I hope you die in a jet fighter crash

Another £40 spent due to this site :(
#4
Heat added, my mrs has been after one but I think I need to do more research and maybe get something better.
1 Like #5
I wonder if the purchasing department at jessops saw BBC@ Stargazing :)
banned 6 Likes #6
Would this be suitable for seeing into a bedroom window approximaetly 78.92 feet away and frequented by a young lady called Fanny Trimbush?

Edited By: SHOWMAN36 on Jan 29, 2011 12:33
#7
@Showman36, if you were okay with the fact that she'll be upside down in your viewfinder, then sure, go for it :p
#8
SHOWMAN36
Would this be suitable for seeing into a bedroom window approximaetly 78.92 feet away and frequented by a young lady called Fanny Trimbush?

You live near me then lol
4 Likes #9
Adidas Addict
Heat added, my mrs has been after one but I think I need to do more research and maybe get something better.

Was thinking the same thing but then decided I'd rather have £39 worth of scope sat in the corner collecting dust than a £200 one lol
#10
"399x Maximum magnification"

Balderdash. This kind of claim means "rubbish toy telescope" anywhere knowledgeable stargazers gather.
But if your aim is to shut your kid up about astronomy, this should do the trick. Beware though, the begging for a pony will start up shortly.
#11
LongPockets
"399x Maximum magnification"

Balderdash. This kind of claim means "rubbish toy telescope" anywhere knowledgeable stargazers gather.
But if your aim is to shut your kid up about astronomy, this should do the trick. Beware though, the begging for a pony will start up shortly.


Going by what was mentioned on stargazing and the hundreds/thousands people spend, I'm going to assume this is still better than my crappy binoculars :)
#12
this should be good for gazing at some heavenly bodies :{
1 Like #13
sten
this should be good for gazing at some heavenly bodies :{


miles away maybe. if its down the road you'll be seeing their pimples or dandruff due to overzooming
#14
Good Deal - if I did not live in the middle of Suburbia Id be sorely tempted. Hot from me.
#15
Anyone know if this can connect to a digital camera and how to do it? (other than cellotape and string (_;) )
#16
schizoboy
LongPockets
"399x Maximum magnification"

Balderdash. This kind of claim means "rubbish toy telescope" anywhere knowledgeable stargazers gather.
But if your aim is to shut your kid up about astronomy, this should do the trick. Beware though, the begging for a pony will start up shortly.


Going by what was mentioned on stargazing and the hundreds/thousands people spend, I'm going to assume this is still better than my crappy binoculars :)


Depends. For the moon or open star clusters (like Pleiades) a £40 pair of binocs will do great, especially if you can steady them on something (like a wall?). I have my doubts that this will resolve the planets well.
#17
This is a pretty poor telescope actually.

The difference between a good scope and a bad scope is like night and day.

A telescope is almost always the more you pay the better the scope.
2 Likes #18
davej1710
Anyone know if this can connect to a digital camera and how to do it? (other than cellotape and string (_;) )


Couple of ways. You can use the telescope as a huge lens, using a T-adapter, an extension tube, and a camera mount adapter for your SLR.

Or you can get an adapter that lets you try and focus the image in the eyepiece into the camera. Something like this

Then all you need is a really clear night, some stable ground, warm clothes and a couple of hours =P

This is a picture of Saturn I took with my Sky Watcher 130p and my Panasonic DMC-FZ8 a couple of years ago. I don't appear to have any newer stuff at hand.
http://i.imgur.com/sukNI.png
#19
CalumUK
This is a pretty poor telescope actually.

The difference between a good scope and a bad scope is like night and day.

A telescope is almost always the more you pay the better the scope.


The mount looks pretty suspect too.
1 Like #20
LongPockets
"399x Maximum magnification"

Balderdash. This kind of claim means "rubbish toy telescope" anywhere knowledgeable stargazers gather.

Indeed, and with the lenses provided you only get 133x as the maximum anyway, which is probably only of any use for the Moon with this quality of telescope, assuming the focuser is controllable enough.


JBardey
The mount looks pretty suspect too.

I can't see any obvious locking points, so I'd assume it'll either be stiff in motion or it will slide one way or the other due to gravity if not balanced.

Taken a few years ago with just an old 3mpix compact on my 150mm scope, just by holding the camera to the eyepiece (manual focus is needed for this, as the camera has no clue what to do):
http://img62.imageshack.us/img62/1940/dcp0564s.jpg
#21
For the astronomy experts here, if not this telescope then got any recommendation on one that would be good for a beginner?
#22
kdk
For the astronomy experts here, if not this telescope then got any recommendation on one that would be good for a beginner?


....that doesnt cost the earth.... ;)
#23
This is the non-motorized version of my telescope. You only really need the motor for photography.
Supplied eyepieces are pretty good. If you want to know more go to StarGazers Lounge and read some of the threads on there. The community is fairly helpful and there's a lot of information there.

If you just want to casually look at stars, I'd still recommend a pair of binoculars, as there is far less hassle in setting up and viewing.
#24
JBardey
This is the non-motorized version of my telescope. You only really need the motor for photography.
Supplied eyepieces are pretty good. If you want to know more go to StarGazers Lounge and read some of the threads on there. The community is fairly helpful and there's a lot of information there.

If you just want to casually look at stars, I'd still recommend a pair of binoculars, as there is far less hassle in setting up and viewing.


Thanks for your posts I was looking at buying this next week, and the picture of saturn you provided is fantastic. Will definitely get one now. Is it worth ordering the motor as well?

Edited By: jeds on Jan 29, 2011 21:08
#25
Ha! Would you believe that earlier today I saw this on Amazon used for £70 and during my hesitation about getting it someone else bought it. I should have asked for your recommendation earlier in the day. :) Anyway, thanks very much for the tip and the link.
#26
jeds
JBardey
This is the non-motorized version of my telescope. You only really need the motor for photography.
Supplied eyepieces are pretty good. If you want to know more go to StarGazers Lounge and read some of the threads on there. The community is fairly helpful and there's a lot of information there.

If you just want to casually look at stars, I'd still recommend a pair of binoculars, as there is far less hassle in setting up and viewing.


Thanks for your posts I was looking at buying this next week, and the picture of saturn you provided is fantastic. Will definitely get one now. Is it worth ordering the motor as well?


The motorised one is useful if you plan on using a high magnification eyepiece, to keep an object in view for longer, or as I've said want to do photography using your telescope. The motors are about £70+ on their own so it's worth considering buying with the telescope.

To properly track objects in the sky you need to align your telescope with the north star as this is what everything in the sky appears to revolve around. The setup can take 15 minutes but is well worth doing if you are going to spend an evening outside. The instructions with the telescope normally explain aligning the mount. Only the equatorial can track, but maneuvering around the sky can take some getting used to. When I first started this wiki was very helpful.

kdk
Ha! Would you believe that earlier today I saw this on Amazon used for £70 and during my hesitation about getting it someone else bought it. I should have asked for your recommendation earlier in the day. :) Anyway, thanks very much for the tip and the link.


Not a problem. Shame you missed out, that telescope for £70 would have been a steal.

Telescopes can be a demanding mistress, but have some patience and you'll be able to see some truly breathtaking things in the sky with them. I remember taking that picture of Saturn, the feeling of accomplishment was huge, especially when I sat and thought about how far away it is.

Only other thing I'd say is look for a local Astronomy group. They'll have meets and have all manner of telescopes there, most people will allow you to look through and use their telescopes, as well as answering questions.

This is going to be my next purchase. It's a monster!
#27
Sorry to be cheeky but is there a motorised version you can link to so I can see it as I'm interested in purchasing one as I would love to start using it with my camera cheers
#28
Meant to say aswell what are the key things to look for to get a decent telescope in this price range I understand the more you pay etc but we are just starting out n don't want to spent hundreds n hundreds cheers
#29
jaffacat
Sorry to be cheeky but is there a motorised version you can link to so I can see it as I'm interested in purchasing one as I would love to start using it with my camera cheers
I know nothing about telescopes but I was able to find a version of the Skywatcher Explorer 130 that JBardey recommended for £119 or with a motor for £149 (+£10 shipping in either case, I think). Here's the link. That was the best price I could find by about £10 for the non-motorized one (I didn't price check the motorized one).

Edited By: kdk on Jan 30, 2011 11:41: spelling
#30
jaffacat
Meant to say aswell what are the key things to look for to get a decent telescope in this price range I understand the more you pay etc but we are just starting out n don't want to spent hundreds n hundreds cheers


Pretty much stick to the well known manufacturers, SkyWatcher, Celestron, Meade and you'll get a good instrument that will last for years, and keep it's value if you decide it's not for you.

The larger the diameter of the telescope the more light you'll gather the dimmer the objects you can see. The upper limits really depend on the amount of space you have and your budget. The Skywatcher 130 is a 6" telescope, which is pretty good as a starting point.

Don't be fooled by claims of magnification on the box, for example this claims to give you 399x magnification, but this will be a poor image (likely very very dim). A telescope of this size will realistically give a decent image up to 150x magnification.

Magnification is worked out by dividing the focal length (typically a large number, in this case it's 800, with this style telescope it works out to be roughly the length of the optical tube) by the currently selected eyepiece.

So to get their mythical 399x magnification they are using the smallest eyepiece (the 6mm) coupled with the 3x barlow lens. Realistically using the 6mm eyepiece by itself would be the highest you can go using this telescope (133x magnification).

Higher powers are only useful for viewing planets or the moon, due to their narrow field of view. A lot of the time I use a 25mm or 30mm eyepiece on my Skywatcher (26x or 20x magnifications (650/25 or 650/30)).

This thread over at stargazers lounge explains the math behind it a bit.
#31
Cool thanks for the advice
1 Like #32
For this price range get Binoculars!

Magnification isnt as much use as light gathering ability
beside with binoculars your using both eyes and hence 4x the contrast!

This is practically useless for Astronomy as are the high magnifications this claims!
As a rough guide:
For this type of telescope (Reflector) you want a 4.5" or very approx 115mm diameter not 80mm!
and for Refractor Telescope 3"
These minimum values are suggested by the likes of Patrick Moore et all

so your looking to pay more and better of with a better make like suggested above

A good recommendation is 7x50 Binoculars (thats only a magnification of 7x btw)
or 10x50 binos (sometimes on a great deal from Lidl)
here even though the latter have a higher magnification the former give you a better light gathering to magnification ratio/eye relief etc

then get a tripod and binocular adaptor
Thats generally more useful for starting out


Edited By: corzair on Jan 30, 2011 19:52
#33
Get these instead:

http://www.firstlightoptics.com/proddetail.php?prod=revelation_15x70&cat=150

I promise you these binoculars will give much better views.

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