Jessops 800-80 Astronomical Telescope Was £99.00 NOW £39.99 - HotUKDeals
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An Ideal starter scope for any budding astronomer, everything required to open up the fantastic world of astronomy and bring the delights of space observation down to earth. Furthermore, the unit is supplied part assembled making the assembly process a breeze.

Specification:
800mm focal length
80mm objective diameter
Focal ratio: F/10
40x Minimum magnification
399x Maximum magnification


Box Contents:
Reflector telescope
6mm, 12.5mm and 20mm eyepieces
Electronic red dot finder scope (battery included)
3x Barlow lens
Aluminium tripod
Altitude slow-motion adjustment bar
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uglybeautyqueen Avatar
5y, 11m agoFound 5 years, 11 months ago
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#1
just picked one up for my son's after having both of them pester for months for a telescope
banned#2
Good price, I paid close to £90 for a similar one last year!
#3
I think i'll pick one of these up in-store. Thanks for the tip off...
#4
no problem, i think its a fantastic price as i paid £30 for one no where near as good as this one. which is going back tomorrow.

Edited By: uglybeautyqueen on Dec 17, 2010 16:11
8 Likes #5
These toy telescopes are more likely to put off a "budding astronomer" than give any encouragement. You need about a minimum 3 inch objective for a refractor and 5 or 6 inch for a reflector for an "ideal starting scope". The "399x Maximum magnification" is meaningless. You won't be able to see anything if you attempt to use that, just dim, fuzzy blobs flashing across the image area. Neither resolution or light gathering power is up to that magnification, and the mount is not stable enough to keep anything in view at that power either.

Or perhaps this is just a cheap way to stop the pestering. Very effective- they will never ask for another telescope.


Edited By: megotmail on Dec 17, 2010 16:19
3 Likes #6
It will become a useful coathanger for any kid after the disappointment at looking through this, it may be a decent price for a toy but next to useless for a budding Astronomer.

Buy your kids a pair of binoculars if their interested in Astronomy (think Lidl had a reasonable pair at £15)
#7
megotmail
These toy telescopes are more likely to put off a "budding astronomer" than give any encouragement. You need about a minimum 3 inch objective for a refractor and 5 or 6 inch for a reflector for an "ideal starting scope". The "399x Maximum magnification" is meaningless. You won't be able to see anything if you attempt to use that, just dim, fuzzy blobs flashing across the image area. Neither resolution or light gathering power is up to that magnification, and the mount is not stable enough to keep anything in view at that power either.

So what are you saying (_;)

MM
#8
Nice. This looked not bad for £100 when I saw it instore.
2 Likes #9
my son is almost 6 i think its fine for him and to be honest he probably wont use it much but its what he asked for so ive got it for him.
3 Likes #10
megotmail
These toy telescopes are more likely to put off a "budding astronomer" than give any encouragement. You need about a minimum 3 inch objective for a refractor and 5 or 6 inch for a reflector for an "ideal starting scope". The "399x Maximum magnification" is meaningless. You won't be able to see anything if you attempt to use that, just dim, fuzzy blobs flashing across the image area. Neither resolution or light gathering power is up to that magnification, and the mount is not stable enough to keep anything in view at that power either.


But is it good enough for me to peer into that building across the street?
#11
Lidl has two kinds of binoculars for 15 quid at the moment. One is a sensible 10*50 and the other is a zoom, 15-30*60. The Zoom ones are too powerful (i.e. dim) and zoom itself is a useless gimmick in binoculars (it degrades the image quality), but the others might be OK.

TV's favourite one-eyed astronomer always used to inveigh against these toy scopes and recommend binoculars instead. Haven't heard him on the subject lately.
#12
Anyone know if this will fit a DSLR with appropriate adaptor? If so which one please? - M42/ T / T2 ? Thanks.
#13
fulyue

But is it good enough for me to peer into that building across the street?


No. Astronomical telescopes normally show the image upside down.
#14
Trust me and Megotmail on this one.

If your kid has an interest in Astronomy then buy them a pair of Binoculars. They can use the binoculars for all sorts of things like bird watching, at the beach ect. You can always upgrade to something more serious if they keep the interest going.

This is a toy, it will get pulled out once and then put away again.
1 Like #15
And people won't be using this for watching that housewife across the back lane/gardens stripping for bed or bath....oh no, not at all X):p
1 Like #16
GlentoranMark
Trust me and Megotmail on this one.

If your kid has an interest in Astronomy then buy them a pair of Binoculars. They can use the binoculars for all sorts of things like bird watching, at the beach ect. You can always upgrade to something more serious if they keep the interest going.

This is a toy, it will get pulled out once and then put away again.



I agree but if a young kid wants one for Christmas it is only £30 why not.
#17
fulyue
megotmail
These toy telescopes are more likely to put off a "budding astronomer" than give any encouragement. You need about a minimum 3 inch objective for a refractor and 5 or 6 inch for a reflector for an "ideal starting scope". The "399x Maximum magnification" is meaningless. You won't be able to see anything if you attempt to use that, just dim, fuzzy blobs flashing across the image area. Neither resolution or light gathering power is up to that magnification, and the mount is not stable enough to keep anything in view at that power either.
But is it good enough for me to peer into that building across the street?

For near 40 quid it should knock on the door too!!!!!
#18
megotmail
fulyue

But is it good enough for me to peer into that building across the street?


No. Astronomical telescopes normally show the image upside down.


So,could you recommend a good one for peering into buildings across the street?

Edited By: DerryBhoy on Dec 17, 2010 17:04
#19
DerryBhoy
megotmail
fulyue

But is it good enough for me to peer into that building across the street?


No. Astronomical telescopes normally show the image upside down.


So,could you recommend a good one for peering into buildings across the street?


You want something with a rectified image for terrestrial observation. This means a spotting scope generally.
2 Likes #20
As a keen astronomer, I hope you take my advice

It's a £40 piece of junk...Don't buy it...you have been warned!

I dont even think the eyepiece elements are made of glass.

A cheap pair of £15 binoculars from Lidl, (Bressers, and they are very good for the money too) will give them far more enjoyment of the night sky.

... AND dad can use for peering into buildings across the street :)



Edited By: tony4563 on Dec 17, 2010 18:40
#21
I've got the Lidl zoom binoculars which are great for the price. When I use the zoom I lean them on something to steady the movement, great for moon gazing or for bird watching. The zoom can be a bit blurred sometimes, other times simply awesome.
#22
Agreed. Binoculars are a better way to go. Good deal if just as a starter present though.
#23
Yes I like bird watching... some good ones in that building across the street :-)
#24
Waste of money for astro uses.
1 Like #25
At least anyone that buy's it will have somewhere to hang their coats after the first use.

I also am a keen amateur astronomer, I own both binoculars and a small telescope (4" Celestron refractor) and can honestly say I use the binoculars much more than the telescope. Binoculars are so versatile and it takes 30 seconds to get them ready while 10 minutes to set up my scope. They are a great way for finding you're way about the sky and you'll see so much more through a pair of 10x50's than a 70mm f/10 reflector. The only thing worth looking at through this will be the Moon.

BTW seriously teach your kids to never look through a telescope at the Sun. I projected the Sun's image when I first got my Celestron for 5 seconds and no more and destroyed a 9mm eyepiece. Your kid will be blinded if they look at the Sun. Can't stress this enough.
#26
megotmail
These toy telescopes are more likely to put off a "budding astronomer" than give any encouragement. You need about a minimum 3 inch objective for a refractor and 5 or 6 inch for a reflector for an "ideal starting scope". The "399x Maximum magnification" is meaningless. You won't be able to see anything if you attempt to use that, just dim, fuzzy blobs flashing across the image area. Neither resolution or light gathering power is up to that magnification, and the mount is not stable enough to keep anything in view at that power either.

Or perhaps this is just a cheap way to stop the pestering. Very effective- they will never ask for another telescope.



I can't agree more. Had a chat with the other half and indeed a 3" objective really isn't enough. She really wouldn't be happy with anything less than 6"!
#27
If it's purchased as a toy telescope to mess about with then that's as much as you can expect from something like this. The optics on a cheap (cheapy cheap) pair of 10 x 50 binoculars will wipe the floor with this one.
#28
" The only thing worth looking at through this will be the Moon "

Which will have all the colours of a kaleidascope and be awashed in purple haze due to poor optics


" I can't agree more. Had a chat with the other half and indeed a 3" objective really isn't enough. She really wouldn't be happy with anything less than 6"! "

Good job mines a 10 incher...
3 Likes #29
Not a lot of proper alternatives being offered - not as good looking but a proper bit of kit for a kids starter according to quite a few astronomy sites. (I was looking last year for my lad - but he changed his mind and got a DS - blinking kids) And it's at least made by a real telescope specialist.

£38.69 from Amazon - slightly cheaper from market place.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Celestron-21024-76-mm-Firstscope/dp/B001UQ6E4Y/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1292618774&sr=1-1

Cheapest i could find with a quick google - there may be cheaper out there.

http://direct.tesco.com/q/R.206-3823.aspx - £39.97 but looks like quicker delivery.



Edited By: MINCER on Dec 17, 2010 21:09: addition
1 Like #30
Saw this today in town. Looked OK. Probably not £99 worth, but certainly a good deal at £40. Heat added. That said I agree with most of the more disparaging comments above.

Advantage: Is a Newtonian Reflector, so will provide a better image and more stability then a refractor of the same size
Disadvantage: Aperture too small to see planets well, flimsy and will probably loosen up over a year.

That said, parents, let's be realistic. Our little Johnny probably isn't the next Carl Sagan, he just wants a telescope and better to spend £40 on something that will be used once then £100!

If you want a really good 'proper' telescope at a good price look here. You don't get better value then a TAL and they will last forever...

http://www.sherwoods-photo.com/tal_scopes/tal_fs.htm

Edited By: Dan Gray on Dec 17, 2010 21:20
#31
supergran
She really wouldn't be happy with anything less than 6"!

:{
#32
MINCER
Not a lot of proper alternatives being offered - not as good looking but a proper bit of kit for a kids starter according to quite a few astronomy sites. (I was looking last year for my lad - but he changed his mind and got a DS - blinking kids) And it's at least made by a real telescope specialist.£38.69 from Amazon - slightly cheaper from market place. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Celestron-21024-76-mm-Firstscope/dp/B001UQ6E4Y/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1292618774&sr=1-1Cheapest i could find with a quick google - there may be cheaper out there.

Well done mincer
1 Like #33
#35
leighonigar
DerryBhoy
megotmail
fulyue

But is it good enough for me to peer into that building across the street?


No. Astronomical telescopes normally show the image upside down.


So,could you recommend a good one for peering into buildings across the street?


You want something with a rectified image for terrestrial observation. This means a spotting scope generally.


Priceless - :) I love this site
#36
But in all honesty to OP - the advice on here is great - dont bother with this because kids love astronomy and this will just put them off. A good intro book with lots of pics and decent pair of Bino's is much better.
#37
Dan Gray
Saw this today in town. Looked OK. Probably not £99 worth, but certainly a good deal at £40. Heat added. That said I agree with most of the more disparaging comments above.

Advantage: Is a Newtonian Reflector, so will provide a better image and more stability then a refractor of the same size
Disadvantage: Aperture too small to see planets well, flimsy and will probably loosen up over a year.

That said, parents, let's be realistic. Our little Johnny probably isn't the next Carl Sagan, he just wants a telescope and better to spend £40 on something that will be used once then £100!

If you want a really good 'proper' telescope at a good price look here. You don't get better value then a TAL and they will last forever...

http://www.sherwoods-photo.com/tal_scopes/tal_fs.htm


Yeah love it!
"Please be aware that this product is supplied with a solar eyepiece filter
which should not be used."
WTF?
#38
CoenFan

"Please be aware that this product is supplied with a solar eyepiece filter
which should not be used."
WTF?


Seriously, don't use it. These can shatter from the heat and leave you looking straight at the sun at full power. That will burn your retina before you can blink.

Why do the manufacturers include these items in their kits? Who knows. They are made in the far east, by inscrutable Asians.
1 Like #39
After looking at the moon using my spotting scope there was so much detail.craters etc.

I was just wondering what you could see with a pair of binoculars. Apart from the moon all there would be would be spots in the sky (which you could see with the naked eye) or is there something i should be trying to look at.
Must admit in London you dont see the stars easily. When we went to Norfolk it was like being on another planet with thousands of stars to be seen, satellites etc.
#40
GlentoranMark
At least anyone that buy's it will have somewhere to hang their coats after the first use.

I also am a keen amateur astronomer, I own both binoculars and a small telescope (4" Celestron refractor) and can honestly say I use the binoculars much more than the telescope. Binoculars are so versatile and it takes 30 seconds to get them ready while 10 minutes to set up my scope. They are a great way for finding you're way about the sky and you'll see so much more through a pair of 10x50's than a 70mm f/10 reflector. The only thing worth looking at through this will be the Moon.

BTW seriously teach your kids to never look through a telescope at the Sun. I projected the Sun's image when I first got my Celestron for 5 seconds and no more and destroyed a 9mm eyepiece. Your kid will be blinded if they look at the Sun. Can't stress this enough.


lol...I had a similar experience to this, when the solar eclipse event happened over 10 years ago...pointed my argos refractor telescope at the sun and projected the image onto a piece of paper. Before I knew it, it had melted away the plastic sides of the eyepiece.

+1 to the 'use once and it gets put away' comment, mines been in the garage for donkeys

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