Jessops Astronomical Telescope 1100-102 102mm £40.47 @ Jessops - HotUKDeals
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Jessops Astronomical Telescope 1100-102 102mm £40.47 @ Jessops

£40.47 @ Jessops
Really good starter scope. Use code binos10 to get price to £40.47 collect in store. Delivery is available but may be a bit of a wait. Spec: Jessops Astronomical Telescope 1100-102 Larger tele… Read More
teggl97 Avatar
2y, 9m agoFound 2 years, 9 months ago
Really good starter scope. Use code binos10 to get price to £40.47 collect in store.

Delivery is available but may be a bit of a wait.

Spec:
Jessops Astronomical Telescope 1100-102
Larger telescope for brighter deep sky images

Unlike many starter telescopes, the Jessops 1100-102 Reflector Telescope has a 102mm objective diameter, much larger than the 60-80mm normally found.

What benefit does this have? Well it means that there's a much larger area to capture light which means a much brighter image and sharper details.

This well built telescope comes supplied with three eyepieces and a 3x Barlow lens for a range of different magnifications. The tripod mount also has a fine adjustment feature for easy following of astronomical objects.

Specifications

Configuration: Newtonian Reflector
1100mm Focal length
102mm objective diameter
Red dot finder scope
3x Barlow lens supplied
6mm, 12.5mm & 20mm eyepieces included
Maximum magnification of 400x
Including tripod & counter balance weights
Micro adjustment controls
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All Comments

(29) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
Don't know much about these things but my boy is looking for one... Can use this to view planets or it is not powerful enough?
#2
chrisrichardson24
Don't know much about these things but my boy is looking for one... Can use this to view planets or it is not powerful enough?

If you can locate them sure.
#3
chrisrichardson24
Don't know much about these things but my boy is looking for one... Can use this to view planets or it is not powerful enough?

I've been reading some reviews online and you can view some planets with it. Maybe try this one to get started; http://www.jessops.com/online.store/categories/products/jessops/600-50-junior-astronomical-telescope-83137/show.html you can use the same discount code
2 Likes #4
How can this be astronomical and yet still be a deal? ;-)
#5
chrisrichardson24
Don't know much about these things but my boy is looking for one... Can use this to view planets or it is not powerful enough?
buy what you can afford and check the astronomers forums of tips. one of the best i can give you is get out of the city to avoid light pollution which masks the night sky. in some cases a pair of binoculars can be more powerful than a telescope. and don't opt for juniors ans smaller fashioned ones as it'll be a waste.
5 Likes #6
kristoff
How can this be astronomical and yet still be a deal? ;-)

http://awesomegifs.com/wp-content/uploads/jon-stewart-colbert-bravo.gif

:)
#7
A very good price for a 4" reflector telescope. Site reviews are a bit dodgy, but reading into them it would appear that some people can't even get an image... very strange. However have ordered for future delivery as only shops with stock were London and Shrewsbury. Thanks for the find.
1 Like #8
I've tried this type of telescope before & generally they are all poor. To get a good telescope you need to spend a lot more than £50. After a couple of tries you will pack this up forget about it. Do yourself a favour, go to a club & try some scopes out to see what you get for your cash.
#9
Tabintab
I've tried this type of telescope before & generally they are all poor. To get a good telescope you need to spend a lot more than £50. After a couple of tries you will pack this up forget about it. Do yourself a favour, go to a club & try some scopes out to see what you get for your cash.

So does that tell us this scope cant really see planets? If not, which sort of price range to see a decent planet images? Would be cool to point us to a right direction. Which sort of brand and model you can recommend us?
#10
mixandmatchfash
Tabintab
I've tried this type of telescope before & generally they are all poor. To get a good telescope you need to spend a lot more than £50. After a couple of tries you will pack this up forget about it. Do yourself a favour, go to a club & try some scopes out to see what you get for your cash.

So does that tell us this scope cant really see planets? If not, which sort of price range to see a decent planet images? Would be cool to point us to a right direction. Which sort of brand and model you can recommend us?
what would you class as a decent planet image?
#11
Another daft question, I know absolutely nothing about these.

But can you use use these as binoculars for more closer to earth viewing? such as airplanes ..etc.
1 Like #12
Beginners might want to check out dobsonian telescopes - they're on a base that swivels, so it's fairly intuitive to navigate your way around the sky. I found my first look through a scope to bit a little underwhelming, but then you get better at finding the more interesting stuff, realise what you're actually looking at, etc etc. Read up on eyepieces, scope types, mounts (some are manual, some have tracking motors, some are computer controlled)

Also have a look at Stellarium (free star map software) and Google Sky Maps on Android phones
#13
J4GG4
Another daft question, I know absolutely nothing about these.

But can you use use these as binoculars for more closer to earth viewing? such as airplanes ..etc.

An aeroplane would be hard to target because they move so relatively fast. Even if you did manage to get it in view, it'd be gone again very quickly. I suppose you could use it for looking across landscapes, etc, but binoculars would be easier
#14
mixandmatchfash
Tabintab
I've tried this type of telescope before & generally they are all poor. To get a good telescope you need to spend a lot more than £50. After a couple of tries you will pack this up forget about it. Do yourself a favour, go to a club & try some scopes out to see what you get for your cash.
So does that tell us this scope cant really see planets? If not, which sort of price range to see a decent planet images? Would be cool to point us to a right direction. Which sort of brand and model you can recommend us?

I've got a slightly larger scope than this (a Skywatcher Heritage 130p flextube - around £130) With the highest magnification eyepiece I've got, Jupiter is a small dot that you can see some colour banding across, and you can see the larger moons around it as specks of light. Saturn is a white dot with a band around it. The moon is pretty good though - lots of detail to see there
1 Like #15
Lets be honest, whose actually going to use this for it's proper use? (_;)


Edited By: RyanBest on Jul 28, 2014 00:47
2 Likes #16
Works great for the lady across the street
4 Likes #17
Unclegeorge
Works great for the lady across the street


she walks on the ceiling most of the time, right?
#18
J4GG4
Another daft question, I know absolutely nothing about these.

But can you use use these as binoculars for more closer to earth viewing? such as airplanes ..etc.

Binos or A Spotting Scope would be better for that. or get into photography and get a decent lens.
#19
RyanBest
Lets be honest, whose actually going to use this for it's proper use? (_;)



we just used this thing 4-5 time .. quit nice for child
#20
I have one of these and...its pretty poor. I hated the stand, I hated the eyepieces and I just generally hated it. I tried to connect it to a DSLR in a last ditch attempt but that didnt work at all either. If it's literally all you can afford then fine, but I think it's equally likely to frustrate you and put you off astronomy.
#21
10x50mm to carry around, then 20x80mm or 25x100mm bins will be fine to start off as powerful bins. Once you master the sky and know your way around then get a scope. Any questions go to a astro club meeting for free advice.
#22
I have one of these. It is an excellent starter scope. You can view the planets and even see the moons around jupiter. HOWEVER, it is not Hubble so keep expectations realistic and you will love it. Great to spend a bit of time with the kids. Use google sky and it makes stuff easy to locate. Spend a minute setting up the laser scope sighting thing and it helps but it will only get you so close, patience is key.
#23
A pair of binoculars at similar price would be better
#24
Amazon have 'celestro 71009 15 x 70 skymaster Porto prism binoculars' for £53. Would be much better imo
#25
lmuk2k
mixandmatchfash
Tabintab
I've tried this type of telescope before & generally they are all poor. To get a good telescope you need to spend a lot more than £50. After a couple of tries you will pack this up forget about it. Do yourself a favour, go to a club & try some scopes out to see what you get for your cash.
So does that tell us this scope cant really see planets? If not, which sort of price range to see a decent planet images? Would be cool to point us to a right direction. Which sort of brand and model you can recommend us?

I've got a slightly larger scope than this (a Skywatcher Heritage 130p flextube - around £130) With the highest magnification eyepiece I've got, Jupiter is a small dot that you can see some colour banding across, and you can see the larger moons around it as specks of light. Saturn is a white dot with a band around it. The moon is pretty good though - lots of detail to see there


Thanks for the details. Will look into it. So i take it this telescope will be even worst then the one you ve mentioned earlier with the £130 telescope.
1 Like #26
If your looking for a starter Telescope then you would be better looking at the Skywatcher/Celestron scope's, they cost more than this but will be far far far better as the optics in these cheap scopes are very poor and will put you off. Avoid ebay scopes also as these use the same awful optics as these Tasco/Jessopes scopes. Not only are the optics rubbish everything else is too from build quality of the scope to the mount which comes with them, you would be better of with a pair of 10x50 Binoculars (meade/bresser which pop up in Lidl now and again for around 12 quid or online around 20 quid) or the skymaster binoculars 15x70 (big Binoculars best off on a tripod if you have shakey hands).
Just IMHO of course but I have been doing Astronomy/Astrophotography for years and know what to stay clear of.
#27
RyanBest
Lets be honest, whose actually going to use this for it's proper use? (_;)


It produces an up-side-down image so you will have to stand on your head to view any object that isn't in the sky
#28
Will I be able to see the Alien Bases on the moon with this?
#29
OK, budget really is only about £50 - would this or the Sky-Watcher Heritage 76 be a better choice. This has a bigger mirror but I know that's not all there is to it and quality comes into it.

Thanks

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