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Cruise Itinerary

Day Place Times

1 Southampton 00:00 17:00

2 Bruges (from Zeebrugge) 07:00 17:00

3 Amsterdam 07:00 17:00

4 At sea

5 Copenhagen 07:00 17:00

6 Copenhagen 07:00 18:00

7 Goteborg 08:00 17:00

8 Oslo 07:00 18:00

9-10 At sea - 2 days

11 Southampton 07:00 00:00

- readingbrown99
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Jodie__ Avatar
2y, 7m agoFound 2 years, 7 months ago
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#1
Yes please!!
#2
Great price for this

Luxury Baltic & Christmas Markets
13th December 2013, Queen Elizabeth
1 Like #3
Tipping not included
2 Likes #4
a flaming good price that. not at all too deer
2 Likes #5
rincewynd6
a flaming good price that. not at all too deer

*groans* :p
#6
Yes it is a great price...but just back from a cruise on this same ship last Tuesday, glad to be off the ship as I caught the "Cunard Cough" - which is a flu/cold type of illness, knocked me for six, never again, still suffering! Love to cruise but will not sail on Queen Elizabeth again not until they sort out the air conditioning - which is the main conduit for "Cunard Cough"
1 Like #7
Tipping is $11.50 per person per day! (Yes the currency on board is US dollars)
1 Like #8
You don't have to tip we always have the tip removed from our bill x
#9
Ah, I wish!
#10
Seriously! Are you sure, did not know that, could have saved a packet!
3 Likes #11
shoppingprincess
You don't have to tip we always have the tip removed from our bill x

How mean and tight is that, given how little Cunard (and all the Carnival-owned companies) pay their staff, and how much they depend on tips to survive? If you can afford a cruise, you can afford to tip. oO
2 Likes #12
shoppingprincess
You don't have to tip we always have the tip removed from our bill x

You definitely are a HUKD spend thrift!
3 Likes #13
Whilst I agree with you on the whole I also remove the tip and tip according to service and not as a demand.


Newbold
shoppingprincess
You don't have to tip we always have the tip removed from our bill x

How mean and tight is that, given how little Cunard (and all the Carnival-owned companies) pay their staff, and how much they depend on tips to survive? If you can afford a cruise, you can afford to tip. oO
1 Like #14
trigger_andy
Whilst I agree with you on the whole I also remove the tip and tip according to service and not as a demand.


Newbold
shoppingprincess
You don't have to tip we always have the tip removed from our bill x

How mean and tight is that, given how little Cunard (and all the Carnival-owned companies) pay their staff, and how much they depend on tips to survive? If you can afford a cruise, you can afford to tip. oO
.

İ think that this like a restuarant automatically adding a service charge irespective of the quality of service recieved and if they do İ never leave a tip for the waiter/ress
#15
cjhilton49
trigger_andy
Whilst I agree with you on the whole I also remove the tip and tip according to service and not as a demand.


Newbold
shoppingprincess
You don't have to tip we always have the tip removed from our bill x

How mean and tight is that, given how little Cunard (and all the Carnival-owned companies) pay their staff, and how much they depend on tips to survive? If you can afford a cruise, you can afford to tip. oO
.

İ think that this like a restuarant automatically adding a service charge irespective of the quality of service recieved and if they do İ never leave a tip for the waiter/ress
Another one intent on cheating low paid staff out of a living wage. Hope you're proud of yourself.
4 Likes #16
Ha ha, get a grip. :D

Newbold
cjhilton49
trigger_andy
Whilst I agree with you on the whole I also remove the tip and tip according to service and not as a demand.


Newbold
shoppingprincess
You don't have to tip we always have the tip removed from our bill x

How mean and tight is that, given how little Cunard (and all the Carnival-owned companies) pay their staff, and how much they depend on tips to survive? If you can afford a cruise, you can afford to tip. oO
.

İ think that this like a restuarant automatically adding a service charge irespective of the quality of service recieved and if they do İ never leave a tip for the waiter/ress
Another one intent on cheating low paid staff out of a living wage. Hope you're proud of yourself.
1 Like #17
Newbold

Another one intent on cheating low paid staff out of a living wage. Hope you're proud of yourself.

Behave, they didn't have to pay for the cruise. They get that for free.
#18
I wanna go
2 Likes #19
mousey
Yes it is a great price...but just back from a cruise on this same ship last Tuesday, glad to be off the ship as I caught the "Cunard Cough" - which is a flu/cold type of illness, knocked me for six, never again, still suffering! Love to cruise but will not sail on Queen Elizabeth again not until they sort out the air conditioning - which is the main conduit for "Cunard Cough"

Do they call it a Cunard Cough as it's Cunard to shift? :D
#20
not heard great things about them, but good price
1 Like #21
shoppingprincess
You don't have to tip we always have the tip removed from our bill x

Tighter than two coats of paint! I bet the staff love you!
1 Like #22
Tried to book the Titanic, but full, may give this a go..........
1 Like #23
I don't agree that these things should be forced on you. As customers you pay for a holiday you should be able to choose who and how much you tip.
1 Like #24
When I cruised with Cunard and MSC I paid the full added gratuity and also went round and gave cash envelopes to room steward and waiters who looked after me. Rightly or wrongly they are paid a pittance for hard hard work and my take on it is that you simply factor in that charge as part of the price. It's part of the tradition of cruising. If you want the whole luxury pampered experience you really can't be so ungracious. I can tell you staff DO know which passengers have removed the gratuities having friends who worked the ships. I don't tip extra to anyone who has not given me full on attentive service though but I'd never take off the applied charge.

On topic: Cunard are doing some stonking good deals at present so now's the time to grab a once in a lifetime experience.
Voting hot!
#25
We always tip, even on the thomsons ones where tips are apparently included
#26
Great deal but, what are you talking about below?


[quote=Jodie__]Describe the deal in your own words and explain to members why it is a good deal! Please don't just paste in marketing text or specs.Remember: this is a community site, self-promotion may result in a ban! If you are connected to the company you're posting for, please contact us.
#27
Wow now that would be a Christmas present , anyone want to get it me ? ;)
1 Like #28
Newbold
shoppingprincess
You don't have to tip we always have the tip removed from our bill x

How mean and tight is that, given how little Cunard (and all the Carnival-owned companies) pay their staff, and how much they depend on tips to survive? If you can afford a cruise, you can afford to tip. oO

I don't think £399 for a 10 day cruise is exactly expensive? - it's wrong for staff to rely on tips - tips should be given ONLY for exceptional service etc at the end of the day that is what a 'tip' is
You may as well call it a compulsary cruise tax otherwise.
Deal sounds good value but not for me!
#29
Thanks :)
#30
Newbold
Another one intent on cheating low paid staff out of a living wage. Hope you're proud of yourself.

I don't think Cunnard are listening :D
#31
dewponds
Newbold
shoppingprincess
You don't have to tip we always have the tip removed from our bill x

How mean and tight is that, given how little Cunard (and all the Carnival-owned companies) pay their staff, and how much they depend on tips to survive? If you can afford a cruise, you can afford to tip. oO

I don't think £399 for a 10 day cruise is exactly expensive? - it's wrong for staff to rely on tips - tips should be given ONLY for exceptional service etc at the end of the day that is what a 'tip' is
You may as well call it a compulsary cruise tax otherwise.
Deal sounds good value but not for me!

If you break it down it's under £40.00 a day for a nice room, all your meals and the food meals are up to 5 courses as well as gracious full on afternoon tea. In addition there's all the shows, dancing and entertainment. You'd be hard put to find a decentish hotel room only at this price. This is a steal. As to the tipping debate: This particular subject incurs much discussion and debate on cruise forums but break that down too and as it's actually less than £8.00 pounds a day.If you went to a nice restaurant for lunch and dinner even a modest 10% would be less than that.
Personally who wants to meet their waiters eye everyday knowing he knows you pulled the gratuity? How about the hard working Stewardess who hovers around waiting for you to leave so she can clear up after you and answers your call for an ice bucket etc even if she was having a much needed sit down? I want to relax and enjoy the whole thing not be steeling myself to face servers who are desperate for their money and who have to smile no matter what. Moneysaving is one thing Meanness is another. If you want to be treated like Royalty behave accordingly and if you disagree with cruise ship tradition and policy on tipping then vote with your feet and don't go.
2 Likes #32
Would be interesting to get some info on how the automatic service charge is distributed. Does it go to the waiter that served you, the managers, etc. I have worked in too many places (and quit shortly after starting) that rob the staff of the tips that customers believe go in their pocket.

Automatic service charges are a difficult one. If they are not added a good 30-40% of people who dine in Britain simply wont tip, a further 20-30% or so will tip very badly (3-5% of the bill) and the remaining 30% or so will tip a decent amount (around 10%). The service charge is there for the people who simply still don't 'get' a tipping culture which waiters rely on to live. (all rough figures from my own experience waiting-on)

Saying a waiter should be prepared to accept minimum wage is naive, you go into the job knowing tips will be part of your wage. Waiting hours are irregular (some weeks 40 hours, other weeks 10-15) and most waiters are on zero-hour contracts.

I do not know a single waiter who would work as a waiter if tips were not part of their job. Every restaurant I have worked in where the service charge is badly or unfairly distributed the staff couldn't give a toss about the customers and service quality suffered terribly.

I believe in giving good service to people I serve, if I gave **** service I would not expect a tip. However giving top quality service and then being tipped badly or not at all is frankly insulting, I don't work to the very best of my ability as a waiter for minimum wage, and why should I?

Edited By: meglaman2000 on Dec 10, 2013 11:48
#33
[quote=meglaman2000]Would be interesting to get some info on how the automatic service charge is distributed. Does it go to the waiter that served you, the managers, etc. I have worked in too many places (and quit shortly after starting) that rob the staff of the tips that customers believe go in their pocket.

Automatic service charges are a difficult one. If they are not added a good 30-40% of people who dine in Britain simply wont tip, a further 20-30% or so will tip very badly (3-5% of the bill) and the remaining 30% or so will tip a decent amount (around 10%). The service charge is there for the people who simply still don't 'get' a tipping culture which waiters rely on to live. (all rough figures from my own experience waiting-on)

Saying a waiter should be prepared to accept minimum wage is naive, you go into the job knowing tips will be part of your wage. Waiting hours are irregular (some weeks 40 hours, other weeks 10-15) and most waiters are on zero-hour contracts.

It's distributed amongst all customer serving staff. Waiters and restaurant staff, kitchen, stewards, cleaning etc but not bar staff ( they get a share out of a separate bar tip) and not shop or counter staff or ships operating staff like officers, electricians or engineering etc. The amount is roughly proportionate to how much personal interaction a staff member has with passengers in their job as they are the perceived 'face' the public interacts with personally like remembering what wine you like at dinner or how many pillows you like when they make your bed. When people remove it everybody takes a dip in their monthly pay and some lines then hold those staff responsible financially. So if you cancel it your steward and waiter will be in trouble and seen as not keeping you happy. Some lines definitely then have it written in contract that any personal tips then given are handed over to make up the pool amount which is missing so those who grandly say they tip themselves are not doing anybody any favours.
You are SO right about the variable amounts people consider OK and half the time at least they don't tip even half in total of the removed charge. Makes me sick frankly. Pompous gits thinking nothing about paying £6.00 for a glass of wine but mingy about £8.00 for all that attentive service being waited on hand and foot then grandly hand out an envelope containing £15.00 after a 12 day voyage with a smug word or two to the minions.
It's archaic and puts strain on those particular staff members but it's the way it is and a ship full of passengers who understand the tipping culture and play the game means they don't do too badly as their bed and board is included so can save on long contracts.
View it as part of the price( it is) and tip who you want additionally.
1 Like #35
in fact waiting staff earns pretty good money considering the tips. but hey... for the high level of stress and insults they have to suffer from customers quite often , they do deserve it. And yeah, usually the automatic service charge is split between everyone including managers and sometimes head office employees (like in my restaurant). Therefore, cash tips are always very welcomed. They get really little money out of the automatically added service charge. So, sometimes is better to take it off but give a tip to the waiter. Additionally if you want a good service then you should expect it in accordance to the level of the restaurant you go to. But, if you want an exceptional attention, especially on the cruise where you meet the same people every day, well... don't be greedy and spend a few pounds to show to your server that you appreciate that they jumping around you. Remember: staff do not set up prices in the menu.
#36
Unfortunately no proper breakdown of how it is distributed. Money going "to the staff" is a given as they are lawfully obliged to do so. This system is easily cheated however.

I used to work in "Le Pain Quotidian" in London covent garden, they have a 12.5% service charge that they state goes "to the staff". In an average week that 12.5% equated to around £6-700, of which personally I would see about £20-30, less than £1 per hour in my wages. A small amount of the rest went to other staff, but most went "to the staff" in other ways, such as; rewards for positive mystery shop, staff parties and staff food during lunch hours. Essentially anything the company could save on its bottom line and still class as "for the staff".

So I am skeptical of any company that chooses how its service charge is distributed on behalf of the staff
#37

The amount is already on the thread further up. I paid $11.00 ( under £8.00) last year on Cunard and 7.00 euros on MSC.
Personal additional tips to individuals on top. I tip my main waiter and assistant table waiter extra and also the steward. I tip head waiters and restaurant managers only if they did something special for me. drinks waiters get a cut of the bar gratuity on each bill but I give a waiter who has looked after me and remembered my drink etc a personal tip too.
The question was how much of that automatic gratuity charge goes to which staff members. Who gets what in effect.
#38
pickledtink


It's distributed amongst all customer serving staff. Waiters and restaurant staff, kitchen, stewards, cleaning etc but not bar staff ( they get a share out of a separate bar tip) and not shop or counter staff or ships operating staff like officers, electricians or engineering etc. The amount is roughly proportionate to how much personal interaction a staff member has with passengers in their job as they are the perceived 'face' the public interacts with personally like remembering what wine you like at dinner or how many pillows you like when they make your bed. When people remove it everybody takes a dip in their monthly pay and some lines then hold those staff responsible financially. So if you cancel it your steward and waiter will be in trouble and seen as not keeping you happy. Some lines definitely then have it written in contract that any personal tips then given are handed over to make up the pool amount which is missing so those who grandly say they tip themselves are not doing anybody any favours.
You are SO right about the variable amounts people consider OK and half the time at least they don't tip even half in total of the removed charge. Makes me sick frankly. Pompous gits thinking nothing about paying £6.00 for a glass of wine but mingy about £8.00 for all that attentive service being waited on hand and foot then grandly hand out an envelope containing £15.00 after a 12 day voyage with a smug word or two to the minions.
It's archaic and puts strain on those particular staff members but it's the way it is and a ship full of passengers who understand the tipping culture and play the game means they don't do too badly as their bed and board is included so can save on long contracts.
View it as part of the price( it is) and tip who you want additionally.

Do you work on the ships?

I have no objection to the charges when they are distributed fairly. I always remove a service charge in a restaurant and then tip cash, but I can see it works differently on a cruise. I will always be skeptical of a company controlling how tips are distributed, in the case of cruises it seems that it is a way of increasing wages without increasing the advertised price of the cruise, to me thats a bit shady, like Easyjet tacking on taxes when you come to pay. But if works and it means the staff genuinely get paid more then it is likely the best way!

Edit: as the post above this mentions, a break down of what goes where should be on the companies home page. A company confident that it fairly distributes a service charge should have NO ISSUE doing this.

Edited By: meglaman2000 on Dec 10, 2013 13:12
#39
meglaman2000
Unfortunately no proper breakdown of how it is distributed. Money going "to the staff" is a given as they are lawfully obliged to do so. This system is easily cheated however.

I used to work in "Le Pain Quotidian" in London covent garden, they have a 12.5% service charge that they state goes "to the staff". In an average week that 12.5% equated to around £6-700, of which personally I would see about £20-30, less than £1 per hour in my wages. A small amount of the rest went to other staff, but most went "to the staff" in other ways, such as; rewards for positive mystery shop, staff parties and staff food during lunch hours. Essentially anything the company could save on its bottom line and still class as "for the staff".

So I am skeptical of any company that chooses how its service charge is distributed on behalf of the staff

I waited tables for years in London in my youth and it was pretty much the same. I would take a job which paid virtually no salary but let me keep all my personal tips any-day over one with the service charge put in the hands of management. Disgusting system OMO. If you know you are going to keep your tip you really give your all.
It's not quite the same on the cruise ships though. Everybody is watching like a hawk and it's a set percentage of the take according to your position. It's definitely no picnic though. Their accommodation is cramped with no privacy at all, their food can be pretty poor in the staff canteen and it's very hard work which they never really get away from. You get to see some places though and they have a cheap staff bar and their own discos and parties. Probably a job for the young.
#40
meglaman2000
[quote=pickledtink]

It's distributed amongst all customer serving staff. Waiters and restaurant staff, kitchen, stewards, cleaning etc but not bar staff ( they get a share out of a separate bar tip) and not shop or counter staff or ships operating staff like officers, electricians or engineering etc. The amount is roughly proportionate to how much personal interaction a staff member has with passengers in their job as they are the perceived 'face' the public interacts with personally like remembering what wine you like at dinner or how many pillows you like when they make your bed. When people remove it everybody takes a dip in their monthly pay and some lines then hold those staff responsible financially. So if you cancel it your steward and waiter will be in trouble and seen as not keeping you happy. Some lines definitely then have it written in contract that any personal tips then given are handed over to make up the pool amount which is missing so those who grandly say they tip themselves are not doing anybody any favours.
You are SO right about the variable amounts people consider OK and half the time at least they don't tip even half in total of the removed charge. Makes me sick frankly. Pompous gits thinking nothing about paying £6.00 for a glass of wine but mingy about £8.00 for all that attentive service being waited on hand and foot then grandly hand out an envelope containing £15.00 after a 12 day voyage with a smug word or two to the minions.
It's archaic and puts strain on those particular staff members but it's the way it is and a ship full of passengers who understand the tipping culture and play the game means they don't do too badly as their bed and board is included so can save on long contracts.
View it as part of the price( it is) and tip who you want additionally.

Do you work on the ships?

Not exactly but my business was in tourism and travel and I know a lot of people well who did and do work on Cruiseships in all capacities from Waiter on QE2( ex BF) and friends: a Chef on Costa, hairdresser on QM2, Spa therapist on Carnival , Purser ON P& O, drummer in one of the bands QM2. Some lines are better than others. Cunard used to be considered a very desirable contract but staff are not happy since it's been taken over. Surprisingly the American owned lines are least favourite and British owned viewed as taking some pride in their staff and treat them with more respect.
Some lines or individual ships are horrible to work for.

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