LG 42PJ650 42" Plasma Television with Freeview £428.15 at Currys with HOT05 discount code - HotUKDeals
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Only available for instore collection:

Please use discount code: hot05 for 5% discount to take it down to £428.15 when ordering

Experience TV shows and movies in the true High Definition magnificence they deserve with the LG 42PJ650 42" HD Ready Plasma TV, owing to its potent dynamic contrast ratio of 3,000,000:1 and detail-packed 720p HD resolution. A fan of action-packed movies and sports? This plasma TV integrates the 600Hz sub-field drive, which captures faced-paced scenes in blur-free, smooth clarity, every time.

The LG 42PJ650 42" HD Ready Plasma TV flaunts a stunning single-layer Infinia design, which will add a touch of class into your home. What's more, its in-built 'Invisible Speaker' system treats your ears to an almighty 20 watts of glorious stereo sound.

When standard TV channels and movies don't satisfy, opt for its integrated digital Freview tuner, which transports you to the world of free-to-air TV and radio. Want to hook up your High Definition devices like your Blu-ray player or game console? Simply utilise its two HDMI connectors.

Further highlights of the LG 42PJ650 comprise a VGA input for attaching up to your PC, plus a handy USB port for playing DivX HD videos, MP3 files and JPEG photos, directly through the television!

Jump into the world of scintillating High Definition TV with the LG 42PJ650 42" HD Ready Plasma TV.
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#1
In store? Web only according to the link....?
#2
Looking for some advice. I'm looking for a 42 inch TV and at the moment I'm pretty convinced I'm better off going for plasma rather than LCD (power consumption isn't a problem because it will only be for occasional use). There will be a PC attached with a blu-ray drive, but I suspect (at first at least) it will be used mainly for SD Freeview and other SD sources (DVDs and avi files). I was looking to spend between £350 and £500 and this deal looks pretty good.

However, I had a reservation that it was not 1080p. I know I wouldn't be getting the best out of my Blu-rays and it's entirely possible I might get some form of HD TV in the future (Free Sat or Freeview HD most likely). So - I found a panasonic set that was 1080p. It was £530, so but I thought I could justify it on the basis it was full HD.

However I read recently that I would possibly get a better picture for SD sources with a TV with a resolution of 1024 x 768 or 1365 x 768 than full 1080p. I beleive this is because it more closely matches the resolution that the SD sources are stored/transmitted in (so there's less doubling up of pixels involved).

It now seems paying I could be paying an extra £100 for a TV where I'd be getting a WORSE picture most of the time!

I'd be really grateful if anyone could confirm I've picked this up right. Also - any advice on what would suit my needs would be great. I'd imagine I would use the TV mostly for sports and DVD movies (with some blu-rays). Will a full 1080p be noticably worse that 768p for SD stuff. For that matter, will it be noticably better for full HD sources. I'll be sitting a little more that 4m from the set most of the time.
#3
ah my friend welcome to the world of TV buying:D. Truth is that there isnt a one size fits all TV. I think Im about where you are, in that you have to weigh up the balance of useage against best possible picture option. Its a tricky balance to commit upon but I think the clincher might be that at 4 metres unless you have eyes like the proverbial rat in a khazi, you wont be able to tell the difference between a 720 and 1080P panel on blu ray anyway. Out of interest Richer sounds do this TV for £449 with the possibility of John Lewis(who also stock this tv) price matching. I plan to go look in JL's over the weekend and try to see if I can convinve myself to buy it!!!
In the meantime take a look at http://www.avforums.co.uk
1 Like #4
Thanks for that. I've posted a thread over at AV Forums re the SD sources question. This is all very confusing!
#5
You're right, Ive orderd two TVs Phillips 42" 7 series LCD great TV poor viewing angles (although on refelction were they that bad?) and then a Panny S20(21 from comet). The Panny drove me mad instantly, flicker.... wouldnt buy another, but flicker only affects some. I notice you had an eye on the G10 go look at one first would hate you to make a mistake?
#6
Thanks for that. Unfortunately (maybe) I've ordered the G10. I'm pretty sure distance selling regs will let me return it if I don't like it. I'll give it a try when it arrives.
#7
Hope not and that its good for you..........im sure it will be, just my ninja eyes!!!
#8
sinkyboy2000
Looking for some advice. I'm looking for a 42 inch TV and at the moment I'm pretty convinced I'm better off going for plasma rather than LCD (power consumption isn't a problem because it will only be for occasional use). There will be a PC attached with a blu-ray drive, but I suspect (at first at least) it will be used mainly for SD Freeview and other SD sources (DVDs and avi files). I was looking to spend between £350 and £500 and this deal looks pretty good. However, I had a reservation that it was not 1080p. I know I wouldn't be getting the best out of my Blu-rays and it's entirely possible I might get some form of HD TV in the future (Free Sat or Freeview HD most likely). So - I found a panasonic set that was 1080p. It was £530, so but I thought I could justify it on the basis it was full HD. However I read recently that I would possibly get a better picture for SD sources with a TV with a resolution of 1024 x 768 or 1365 x 768 than full 1080p. I beleive this is because it more closely matches the resolution that the SD sources are stored/transmitted in (so there's less doubling up of pixels involved).It now seems paying I could be paying an extra £100 for a TV where I'd be getting a WORSE picture most of the time! I'd be really grateful if anyone could confirm I've picked this up right. Also - any advice on what would suit my needs would be great. I'd imagine I would use the TV mostly for sports and DVD movies (with some blu-rays). Will a full 1080p be noticably worse that 768p for SD stuff. For that matter, will it be noticably better for full HD sources. I'll be sitting a little more that 4m from the set most of the time.

Regarding SD resolution, this depends on the picture processing and less on the resolution of the TV. A TV that can perform edge detection and noise filtering would provide a better SD image than one that simply upscales (simple linear interpolation method) even if the former has a higher resolution. The disadvantage of image processing is that usually it cannot take place in real-time because it is computationally intensive which results in the picture being delayed several seconds. This manifests itself when playing computer games where you will not receive immediate response from the controllers, or when changing channels on Sky TV where it takes seconds for the channel changing to take effect.

As you are using a computer, you can use the PC's processing power to perform the image processing by way of a TV tuner card and image processing software (such as PowerCinema and ffdShow). They do enhance SD feeds much better than a TV and furthermore, the software can be upgraded much more easily when new techniques are discovered to improve SD picture quality.

What you have been told is actually incorrect. Given two 42 inch screens with one having a resolution of 960x1080 and the other having 1920x1080 - twice the resolution, an SD feed will have to be upscaled to fit the screen. Since both screens have exactly the same dimensions but the second one has pixels that are half the size of the first we end up with the result that diagonal lines appear less blocky on the second screen due to the smaller pixels. Suppose the pixels of the second screen are 1 mm wide (for argument's sake). If we have to draw a vertical line that is exactly 1mm in width, that vertical line will be drawn to the exact dimensions on the second screen. On the first screen, we have a problem because the pixels are twice the size and the vertical line will have to be drawn at 2mm thickness. I've only touched on the very basic issues but in practice there are many other complexities to account for. What you read in Argos catalogues, in store literature and so on is quite often incorrect. Argos catalogue cannot define HD Ready properly and in-store staff on the High Street tend to spit up the incorrect literature they have read.

Edited By: ElliottC on Jul 23, 2010 09:50:

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