Lloyds Pharmacy Allergy reliever £11.94 from Lloyds Pharmacy via Amazon Marketplace - HotUKDeals
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Reviews on this seem favourable, found a thread on Money Saving expert, where several people swore by them. My Uncle says loads of kids use them in the school where he works. So I've decided to give it a go, For £7.99 plus £3.95 postage, I figure this has got to be worth a gamble. Especially after the day I've had.

I searched the threads first, but only found more expensive ones from long ago. Hope people find this is a worthwhile offer. I'll let you know if mine works!
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5y, 7m agoFound 5 years, 7 months ago
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2 Likes #1
I bought this three years ago and I suffer terribly from hayfever (no anti-histamines seem to be working enough!) and I can confirm that this product DOES help ease symptoms. You need to use it twice a day for just two minutes at a time and it takes a few days to start working but I stand by it 100%. It's excellent for a medication-free treatment.

Am voting HOT!

Edited By: squiff on May 01, 2011 23:25
2 Likes #2
I've got on of these, you feel a bit of a fool with a light-bulb up your nose but it did ease my hayfever last year. Worth a try if you are suffering.
#3
got this for my son last year and it had NO EFFECT whatsoever
#4
I bought one for perennial rhinitis and it worked a treat. I'd recommend trying it as it has no side-effects, etc.
#5
This definently works had for a year or so now lifes much better in the pollenated summer months

donno how it works but its does

why spend on tablets the dont really work

try this one out works instantly

you wont be dissapointed
1 Like #6
jukie
got this for my son last year and it had NO EFFECT whatsoever


You sure you didn't have it in you ears?

Like everyone else I got one of these last year for my son who has terrible hayfever, works amazingly well and no need to take drugs anymore :-)
2 Likes #7
I have one and can confirm it's worth a go - especially ay this price. Didn't change my life, but I feel it did have a beneficial effect. Plus use it at night, turn the lights out & you'll give the kids a real scare!
#8
is it just me or does this thread look like an advertising campaign. commets sound like those from a shopping channel. maybe i've just not had my morning coffee.........
#9
red light therapy o_O. Sounds mumbo-jumbo to me. Perhaps they mean 'generic heat therapy'.
Does this stop your eyes feeling itchy too, as that seems to be the only symptom i get these days?
#10
got one as well. doesnt solve everything, but def helps reduce some of the symptoms
1 Like #11
Silversight
red light therapy o_O. Sounds mumbo-jumbo to me. Perhaps they mean 'generic heat therapy'.
It's based on this scientific paper:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9109708

"Following treatment, improvement of symptoms was reported by 72% of the allergic rhinitis patients and objective improvement was endoscopically demonstrated in 70% of them as compared with 24% and 3%, respectively, in the placebo group."

Note that the paper is from 1997 and I can't seem to find anything more recent. Plus there's 50 participants, which is a fair sample size, but you have to be wary how widely you can apply the results.
#12
I have chronic sinusitis, and that paper specifically excludes use in those circumstances, so for that reason will give it a miss, and not vote either way.

Interesting though that this should not be posted....... Lloyds on Amazon Marketplace have a STINKING reputation of just 93%
I will remember that for any future online purchases from Lloyds on Amazon, or otherwise - quite how they fail so badly at simply posting ready packaged products is a mystery to me! :-(

Edited By: nihcaj on May 02, 2011 12:56
1 Like #13
Forensis
It's based on this scientific paper:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9109708

"Following treatment, improvement of symptoms was reported by 72% of the allergic rhinitis patients and objective improvement was endoscopically demonstrated in 70% of them as compared with 24% and 3%, respectively, in the placebo group."

Note that the paper is from 1997 and I can't seem to find anything more recent. Plus there's 50 participants, which is a fair sample size, but you have to be wary how widely you can apply the results.

Would be interested as to the mode of action it thinks is occurring, my housemate reckons some involvement of Cytochrome C Oxidase, if that means anything to any biologists out there.
#14
The reason there's hardly any scientific facts, figures and papers is because it's known to be rubbish, just like homeopathy and portable ionisors for hayfever. If they worked efficiently, they would be far more popular, and people wouldn't suffer from hayfever, it's not like they're expensive to produce! 2 red LED's and a battery, you could make your own from Maplins for a quid or 2!

If they work for you, then that's good! They didn't work for me or my partner, so personally I'd put my money towards something proven to work, like antihistamines. But if you haven't tried it, you'll never know if the placebo effect works for you and if it does then that's all that matters!
1 Like #15
Silversight
Would be interested as to the mode of action it thinks is occurring, my housemate reckons some involvement of Cytochrome C Oxidase, if that means anything to any biologists out there.

They propose that the visible light interferes with the respiratory chain (which cytochrome C oxidase is involved in). The red light might act to decrease oxygen radical production - these are involved in allergic reactions. It might also interfere with calcium ion transport which is also involved in activating inflammatory responses.

krato
The reason there's hardly any scientific facts, figures and papers is because it's known to be rubbish, just like homeopathy and portable ionisors for hayfever.
I wouldn't compare it to homoeopathy which is proven to be nonsense. Don't know much about ionisers. Phototherapy does have some established uses, particularly in psoriasis:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phototherapy
2 Likes #16
Forensis
Silversight
Would be interested as to the mode of action it thinks is occurring, my housemate reckons some involvement of Cytochrome C Oxidase, if that means anything to any biologists out there.


They propose that the visible light interferes with the respiratory chain (which cytochrome C oxidase is involved in). The red light might act to decrease oxygen radical production - these are involved in allergic reactions. It might also interfere with calcium ion transport which is also involved in activating inflammatory responses.

krato
The reason there's hardly any scientific facts, figures and papers is because it's known to be rubbish, just like homeopathy and portable ionisors for hayfever.

I wouldn't compare it to homoeopathy which is proven to be nonsense. Don't know much about ionisers. Phototherapy does have some established uses, particularly in psoriasis:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phototherapy


Sorry I didn't mean to be knocking light therapy in general, I know it's successfully used for many treatments, but when it comes to red light therapy for hayfever there's nothing to say it works, and due to so many people now suffering with hayfever (20% of the UK population the last time I checked), if it worked it would be a lot more popular, and there would be a lot more research into it. The main reason people feel better after using it is because the prongs hold your nose open, making it easier to breath, there's no evidence towards the actual light helping the symptoms- and that's the same reason why there are plenty of papers, research and experiments regarding homeopathy as a genuine successful alternative to conventional drugs- even though it's not!
1 Like #17
krato
Forensis
Silversight
Would be interested as to the mode of action it thinks is occurring, my housemate reckons some involvement of Cytochrome C Oxidase, if that means anything to any biologists out there.


They propose that the visible light interferes with the respiratory chain (which cytochrome C oxidase is involved in). The red light might act to decrease oxygen radical production - these are involved in allergic reactions. It might also interfere with calcium ion transport which is also involved in activating inflammatory responses.

krato
The reason there's hardly any scientific facts, figures and papers is because it's known to be rubbish, just like homeopathy and portable ionisors for hayfever.

I wouldn't compare it to homoeopathy which is proven to be nonsense. Don't know much about ionisers. Phototherapy does have some established uses, particularly in psoriasis:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phototherapy


Sorry I didn't mean to be knocking light therapy in general, I know it's successfully used for many treatments, but when it comes to red light therapy for hayfever there's nothing to say it works, and due to so many people now suffering with hayfever (20% of the UK population the last time I checked), if it worked it would be a lot more popular, and there would be a lot more research into it. The main reason people feel better after using it is because the prongs hold your nose open, making it easier to breath, there's no evidence towards the actual light helping the symptoms- and that's the same reason why there are plenty of papers, research and experiments regarding homeopathy as a genuine successful alternative to conventional drugs- even though it's not!


Having read a couple of review papers on the topic I have to agree with what krato is saying. Unfortunately it seems, that there is not much scientific evidence that red light therapy is helping rhinitis and nasal polyposis.
The paper citred above http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9109708 has a rather low jadad score (2), which means that the study has been controlled poorly.

I was also hoping for an effective alternative of antihistamines, but no luck with this one.
1 Like #18
Husband and daughter use one - has reduced their symptoms considerably.
#19
I had one 2 years ago and unfortunately it didn't work for me at all either.

My hayfever was that bad that whilst I had the prongs up my nose my nostrills streamed constantly and I contiunued to sneeze throughout. Whilst it is a good price I would say that there is no guarantee that it will work for everyone.
#20
Sounds too good to be true ... unfortunately
2 Likes #21
At this price its worth a try! Heat added! if it doesnt work, take them clubbing as glow sticks.
#22
Just got one from Lloyds Pharmacy for £14.99 & got the Air Purifier worth £9.99 for free with it.
#23
Interesting debate. I have read the above papers (and more) before I decided to place an order. One scientific paper I read suggests effectiveness is not fully understood, but accepted nevertheless.

I accept the basics of phototherapy and I 'buy' the basic principle that the exposure of oversensitive nasal cells to certain UV wavelengths causes them to be temporarily desensitised. I'm happy to accept that the effectiveness isn't wholly proven. I also happy to accept that much of it's 72% success could be down to the placebo effect. Which, again, if effective, is completely fine by me. Ignorance is bliss as they say. It's not the same as faith healing is it. IE. Not the most important topic to get hot under the collar about. Especially if some people ARE experiencing relief from their symptoms.

If you have proof that this couldn't possibly work. Keep it to yourself eh? Nice to see it works for so many people though. Looking forward to it arriving.
#24
i was sceptical about it too, but anyone that suffers like i do will try anything. i was going through ten quid a week on various pills and syrups to no avail. saw this in the paper and bought one. didnt work straight away, took a day or two to notice a difference, but i can confirm it works.
oh and back to the point of the website, it seems a decent deal. :)
#25
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