Magnetic Spice Rack ***Reduced from £12 to £6*** @ Sainsburys - HotUKDeals
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Magnetic Spice Rack ***Reduced from £12 to £6.00*** @ Sainsburys

£6.00 @ Sainsbury's
Very handy and stylish Nine pots, each with a window and a sprinkle hole, are magnetically secured to a stainless steel wall plate. Should you not have sufficient wall space, the rack has a pr… Read More
palamino87 Avatar
6y, 7m agoFound 6 years, 7 months ago
Very handy and stylish


Nine pots, each with a window and a sprinkle hole, are magnetically secured to a stainless steel wall plate. Should you not have sufficient wall space, the rack has a prop, so making it free-standing.

Comes complete with wall fixings.
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6y, 7m agoFound 6 years, 7 months ago
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Comments/page:
#1
shame only home delivery, no click or collect
#2
would be great if you didn't have to pay the £3.95 delivery :-(
#3
Must be very poor quality stainless steel if a magnet will be attracted to it. Would imagine it will show signs of rust fairly quickly.
1 Like #4
Any store availability?
Handy for curry recipes!

What are you tasting tonight?
Of course, curry2night!(_;)
#5
Hey, I got this at the Sainsbury's instore in Enfield. The quality is very good and the 5* reviews on the website also imply this.
1 Like #6
konkywonky
Must be very poor quality stainless steel if a magnet will be attracted to it. Would imagine it will show signs of rust fairly quickly.

Not really true - I've got a stainless steel fridge/freezer (attached magnets on it), which has certainly not rusted over the last three years.
1 Like #7
konkywonky
Must be very poor quality stainless steel if a magnet will be attracted to it. Would imagine it will show signs of rust fairly quickly.

In metallurgy stainless steel, also known as inox steel or inox from French "inoxydable", is defined as a steel alloy with a minimum of 10.5[1] or 11% chromium content by mass.[2] Stainless steel does not stain, corrode, or rust as easily as ordinary steel, but it is not stain-proof.[3] It is also called corrosion-resistant steel or CRES when the alloy type and grade are not detailed, particularly in the aviation industry. There are different grades and surface finishes of stainless steel to suit the environment to which the material will be subjected in its lifetime. Stainless steel is used where both the properties of steel and resistance to corrosion are required.

G :-)
2 Likes #8
konkywonky
Must be very poor quality stainless steel if a magnet will be attracted to it. Would imagine it will show signs of rust fairly quickly.


Stainless steels are a very broad group of metals. The name was adopted as a generic term for steel alloys with a minimum of 10.5% chromium. The chromium gives the steel its 'stainless' properties - essentially corrosion resistance. On the surface of the metal, a very thin chromium-rich oxide layer is formed which is inert - i.e. it prevents the steel from rusting. The advantage of stainless steels over plated steels is that, if scratched or damaged, the steel will 'self-repair' as a new oxide layer is formed. In plated steels, scratches in the plate will often lead to corrosion of the steel underneath.

In general, the higher the proportion of chromium, the stronger the corrosion resistance of the steel. In addition to chromium, other metals are added to give the steel particular properties such as strength and malleability. Specifically nickel is used to strengthen the oxide layer.

As for whether they are magnetic, the answer is that it depends. There are several families of stainless steels with different physical properties. A basic stainless steel has a 'ferritic' structure and is magnetic. These are formed from the addition of chromium and can be hardened through the addition of carbon (making them 'martensitic') and are often used in cutlery. However, the most common stainless steels are 'austenitic' - these have a higher chromium content and nickel is also added. It is the nickel which modifies the physical structure of the steel and makes it non-magnetic.

So the answer is yes, the magnetic properties of stainless steel are very dependent on the elements added into the alloy, and specifically the addition of nickel can change the structure from magnetic to non-magnetic.
1 Like #9
simate
konkywonky
Must be very poor quality stainless steel if a magnet will be attracted to it. Would imagine it will show signs of rust fairly quickly.
Stainless steels are a very broad group of metals. The name was adopted as a generic term for steel alloys with a minimum of 10.5% chromium. The chromium gives the steel its 'stainless' properties - essentially corrosion resistance. On the surface of the metal, a very thin chromium-rich oxide layer is formed which is inert - i.e. it prevents the steel from rusting. The advantage of stainless steels over plated steels is that, if scratched or damaged, the steel will 'self-repair' as a new oxide layer is formed. In plated steels, scratches in the plate will often lead to corrosion of the steel underneath. In general, the higher the proportion of chromium, the stronger the corrosion resistance of the steel. In addition to chromium, other metals are added to give the steel particular properties such as strength and malleability. Specifically nickel is used to strengthen the oxide layer.As for whether they are magnetic, the answer is that it depends. There are several families of stainless steels with different physical properties. A basic stainless steel has a 'ferritic' structure and is magnetic. These are formed from the addition of chromium and can be hardened through the addition of carbon (making them 'martensitic') and are often used in cutlery. However, the most common stainless steels are 'austenitic' - these have a higher chromium content and nickel is also added. It is the nickel which modifies the physical structure of the steel and makes it non-magnetic.So the answer is yes, the magnetic properties of stainless steel are very dependent on the elements added into the alloy, and specifically the addition of nickel can change the structure from magnetic to non-magnetic.

jeeez how glad I feel to have a life :P
#10
i bought the 3 version of this awhile ago instore, for my camper van, to use without the back plate, = uselss the magnet is terrible,not too great eith with the plate, but better.
banned#11
plus £3.95 delivery

and you wont be able to see the labels either. Looks a bit odd to me.
#12
Great, Just what I needed thanks

FYI...on a certain auction site these are £20 new so this even with delivery is a bargain.

thanks
#13
Not paying the delivery charge, going to see if my local is selling them.
#14
flloydee2
simate
konkywonky
Must be very poor quality stainless steel if a magnet will be attracted to it. Would imagine it will show signs of rust fairly quickly.
Stainless steels are a very broad group of metals. The name was adopted as a generic term for steel alloys with a minimum of 10.5% chromium. The chromium gives the steel its 'stainless' properties - essentially corrosion resistance. On the surface of the metal, a very thin chromium-rich oxide layer is formed which is inert - i.e. it prevents the steel from rusting. The advantage of stainless steels over plated steels is that, if scratched or damaged, the steel will 'self-repair' as a new oxide layer is formed. In plated steels, scratches in the plate will often lead to corrosion of the steel underneath. In general, the higher the proportion of chromium, the stronger the corrosion resistance of the steel. In addition to chromium, other metals are added to give the steel particular properties such as strength and malleability. Specifically nickel is used to strengthen the oxide layer.As for whether they are magnetic, the answer is that it depends. There are several families of stainless steels with different physical properties. A basic stainless steel has a 'ferritic' structure and is magnetic. These are formed from the addition of chromium and can be hardened through the addition of carbon (making them 'martensitic') and are often used in cutlery. However, the most common stainless steels are 'austenitic' - these have a higher chromium content and nickel is also added. It is the nickel which modifies the physical structure of the steel and makes it non-magnetic.So the answer is yes, the magnetic properties of stainless steel are very dependent on the elements added into the alloy, and specifically the addition of nickel can change the structure from magnetic to non-magnetic.


jeeez how glad I feel to have a life :P


Moron.
#15
flloydee2
simate
konkywonky
Must be very poor quality stainless steel if a magnet will be attracted to it. Would imagine it will show signs of rust fairly quickly.
Stainless steels are a very broad group of metals. The name was adopted as a generic term for steel alloys with a minimum of 10.5% chromium. The chromium gives the steel its 'stainless' properties - essentially corrosion resistance. On the surface of the metal, a very thin chromium-rich oxide layer is formed which is inert - i.e. it prevents the steel from rusting. The advantage of stainless steels over plated steels is that, if scratched or damaged, the steel will 'self-repair' as a new oxide layer is formed. In plated steels, scratches in the plate will often lead to corrosion of the steel underneath. In general, the higher the proportion of chromium, the stronger the corrosion resistance of the steel. In addition to chromium, other metals are added to give the steel particular properties such as strength and malleability. Specifically nickel is used to strengthen the oxide layer.As for whether they are magnetic, the answer is that it depends. There are several families of stainless steels with different physical properties. A basic stainless steel has a 'ferritic' structure and is magnetic. These are formed from the addition of chromium and can be hardened through the addition of carbon (making them 'martensitic') and are often used in cutlery. However, the most common stainless steels are 'austenitic' - these have a higher chromium content and nickel is also added. It is the nickel which modifies the physical structure of the steel and makes it non-magnetic.So the answer is yes, the magnetic properties of stainless steel are very dependent on the elements added into the alloy, and specifically the addition of nickel can change the structure from magnetic to non-magnetic.


jeeez how glad I feel to have a life :P


Why's that then? It was a simple copy/paste from a site, took no more than 30 seconds to find it and paste it on here. :|
#16
flloydee2
simate
konkywonky
Must be very poor quality stainless steel if a magnet will be attracted to it. Would imagine it will show signs of rust fairly quickly.
Stainless steels are a very broad group of metals. The name was adopted as a generic term for steel alloys with a minimum of 10.5% chromium. The chromium gives the steel its 'stainless' properties - essentially corrosion resistance. On the surface of the metal, a very thin chromium-rich oxide layer is formed which is inert - i.e. it prevents the steel from rusting. The advantage of stainless steels over plated steels is that, if scratched or damaged, the steel will 'self-repair' as a new oxide layer is formed. In plated steels, scratches in the plate will often lead to corrosion of the steel underneath. In general, the higher the proportion of chromium, the stronger the corrosion resistance of the steel. In addition to chromium, other metals are added to give the steel particular properties such as strength and malleability. Specifically nickel is used to strengthen the oxide layer.As for whether they are magnetic, the answer is that it depends. There are several families of stainless steels with different physical properties. A basic stainless steel has a 'ferritic' structure and is magnetic. These are formed from the addition of chromium and can be hardened through the addition of carbon (making them 'martensitic') and are often used in cutlery. However, the most common stainless steels are 'austenitic' - these have a higher chromium content and nickel is also added. It is the nickel which modifies the physical structure of the steel and makes it non-magnetic.So the answer is yes, the magnetic properties of stainless steel are very dependent on the elements added into the alloy, and specifically the addition of nickel can change the structure from magnetic to non-magnetic.


jeeez how glad I feel to have a life :P


Moron.


Moi or one of the others?

Either way your "contribution" is worthless.
#17
I don't think that was directed to you - it was for the guy who was dissin you.

simate
flloydee2
simate
konkywonky
Must be very poor quality stainless steel if a magnet will be attracted to it. Would imagine it will show signs of rust fairly quickly.
Stainless steels are a very broad group of metals. The name was adopted as a generic term for steel alloys with a minimum of 10.5% chromium. The chromium gives the steel its 'stainless' properties - essentially corrosion resistance. On the surface of the metal, a very thin chromium-rich oxide layer is formed which is inert - i.e. it prevents the steel from rusting. The advantage of stainless steels over plated steels is that, if scratched or damaged, the steel will 'self-repair' as a new oxide layer is formed. In plated steels, scratches in the plate will often lead to corrosion of the steel underneath. In general, the higher the proportion of chromium, the stronger the corrosion resistance of the steel. In addition to chromium, other metals are added to give the steel particular properties such as strength and malleability. Specifically nickel is used to strengthen the oxide layer.As for whether they are magnetic, the answer is that it depends. There are several families of stainless steels with different physical properties. A basic stainless steel has a 'ferritic' structure and is magnetic. These are formed from the addition of chromium and can be hardened through the addition of carbon (making them 'martensitic') and are often used in cutlery. However, the most common stainless steels are 'austenitic' - these have a higher chromium content and nickel is also added. It is the nickel which modifies the physical structure of the steel and makes it non-magnetic.So the answer is yes, the magnetic properties of stainless steel are very dependent on the elements added into the alloy, and specifically the addition of nickel can change the structure from magnetic to non-magnetic.


jeeez how glad I feel to have a life :P


Moron.


Moi or one of the others?

Either way your "contribution" is worthless.
#18
alchemistkevin
I don't think that was directed to you - it was for the guy who was dissin you.


I thought the same but wasn't sure. It's easy enough to delete the other quotes as I have here.
1 Like #19
9 pots - Anybody wondering what that really means? Here's what wiki says

Nine is a composite number, its proper divisors being 1 and 3. It is 3 times 3 and hence the third square number. 9 is a Motzkin number. It is the first composite lucky number.

Nine is the highest single-digit number in the decimal system. It is the second non-unitary square prime of the form (p2) and the first that is odd. All subsequent squares of this form are odd. It has a unique aliquot sum 4 which is itself a square prime. 9 is; and can be, the only square prime with an aliquot sum of the same form. The aliquot sequence of 9 has 5 members (9,4,3,1,0) this number being the second composite member of the 3-aliquot tree. It is the aliquot sum of only one number the discrete semiprime 15.

There are nine Heegner numbers.[1]

Since , 9 is an exponential factorial.

8 and 9 form a Ruth-Aaron pair under the second definition that counts repeated prime factors as often as they occur.

A polygon with nine sides is called a nonagon or enneagon.[2] A group of nine of anything is called an ennead.

In base 10 a number is evenly divisible by nine if and only if its digital root is 9.[3] That is, if you multiply nine by any natural number, and repeatedly add the digits of the answer until it is just one digit, you will end up with nine:

2 × 9 = 18 (1 + 8 = 9)
3 × 9 = 27 (2 + 7 = 9)
9 × 9 = 81 (8 + 1 = 9)
121 × 9 = 1089 (1 + 0 + 8 + 9 = 18; 1 + 8 = 9)
234 × 9 = 2106 (2 + 1 + 0 + 6 = 9)
578329 × 9 = 5204961 (5 + 2 + 0 + 4 + 9 + 6 + 1 = 27 (2 + 7 = 9))
482729235601 × 9 = 4344563120409 (4 + 3 + 4 + 4 + 5 + 6 + 3 + 1 + 2 + 0 + 4 + 0 + 9 = 45 (4 + 5 = 9))
n = 3 is the only other n > 1 such that a number is divisible by n if and only if its digital root is n. In base N, the divisors of N − 1 have this property. Another consequence of 9 being 10 − 1, is that it is also a Kaprekar number.

The difference between a base-10 positive integer and the sum of its digits is a whole multiple of nine. Examples:

The sum of the digits of 41 is 5, and 41-5 = 36. The digital root of 36 is 3+6 = 9, which, as explained above, demonstrates that it is evenly divisible by nine.
The sum of the digits of 35967930 is 3+5+9+6+7+9+3+0 = 42, and 35967930-42 = 35967888. The digital root of 35967888 is 3+5+9+6+7+8+8+8 = 54, 5+4 = 9.
Subtracting two base-10 positive integers that are transpositions of each other yields a number that is a whole multiple of nine. Some examples:

41-14 = 27. The digital root of 27 is 2+7 = 9.
36957930-35967930 = 990000, which is obviously a multiple of nine.
This works regardless of the number of digits that are transposed. For example, the largest transposition of 35967930 is 99765330 (all digits in descending order) and its smallest transposition is 03356799 (all digits in ascending order); subtracting pairs of these numbers produces:

99765330-35967930 = 63797400; 6+3+7+9+7+4+0+0 = 36, 3+6 = 9.
99765330-03356799 = 96408531; 9+6+4+0+8+5+3+1 = 36, 3+6 = 9.
35967930-03356799 = 32611131; 3+2+6+1+1+1+3+1 = 18, 1+8 = 9.
Casting out nines is a quick way of testing the calculations of sums, differences, products, and quotients of integers, known as long ago as the 12th Century.[4]

Every prime in a Cunningham chain of the first kind with a length of 4 or greater is congruent to 9 mod 10 (the only exception being the chain 2, 5, 11, 23, 47).

Six recurring nines appear in the decimal places 762 through 767 of pi. This is known as the Feynman point.

If an odd perfect number is of the form 36k + 9, it has at least nine distinct prime factors.[5]

Nine is the binary complement of number six:
1 Like #20
Errr, I'll have some of what they're having!

[note to self] Why did I read this far?
#21
I have the 4 pot one which was £5 at Christmas so this is even better if you can find one instore! Sticks fine and still looks like it did 9 months ago.
#22
Bought the 4 pot one for £1.99 at the Sainsburys near Fosse Park, Leicester, yesterday. They also had a couple of 9 pot ones on the shelf for £3 if that helps anybody.
#23
Out of stock online:-(
Couldn't find any in the one on Archer Road, Sheffield. Would really like to have some, anyone seen any around Sheffield? Thank you!

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