Makita table saw and stand (MLT100X) £412 @ FFX - HotUKDeals
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Makita table saw and stand. I'm looking for a reasonably priced table saw for a DIY project. I've just bought a solid Oak wood floor for my recently-converted loft. It's 20 square metres and to have the floor professionally fitted I've been quoted £1000! So what if I spend half of that money on tools and then spend my own time installing it? How hard can it be?!

This one has good reviews on the web. Looks a lot more substantial than the kind you find in B&Q for a couple of hundred quid. Search YouTube and see some videos of it in action. The thing I like about this saw is that it will do rip cuts, cross cuts and mitres (all new to me but I'm an expert after putting in some YouTube viewing time!). Obviously with a tool like this you have to be very careful. There's a guide covering the blade for safety. Read the instructions carefully and look for videos from the manufacturer.

I've never bought from this retailer before. I've never heard of them either. I hope my post doesn't end up in the spam pile as a result (like the last time I found a very hot deal for you guys which wasn't on any well-known sites offering kick-backs to hotukdeals). They have this particular tool for significantly cheaper than anywhere else on the web (including eBay). Search on Trustpilot and they actually have good reviews there. No mods, I am not affiliated with them. Do try and find this for cheaper elsewhere (trust me I have already spent a few hours trying to do so).
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reakt Avatar
2y, 5m agoFound 2 years, 5 months ago
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1 Like #1
An odd tool to cut wood flooring :)

Unless you're ripping down long pieces of wood, I would of thought a sliding compound miter saw would be a better use of funds. That, plus a jigsaw and a reciprocating multi tool and you've got everything you need to do a decent job.

Heat for the price though :)
1 Like #3
Ockingshay
An odd tool to cut wood flooring :)

Unless you're ripping down long pieces of wood, I would of thought a sliding compound miter saw would be a better use of funds. That, plus a jigsaw and a reciprocating multi tool and you've got everything you need to do a decent job.

Heat for the price though :)
I have fit engineered wood floors on 3 separate occasions. Jigsaws are pretty useless as you will never get a straight cut. That's what I've used in the past, together with a mitre saw. This time I shelled out £1000 on a really good quality floor. The planks are 15mm thick and 2 metres long. Rip-cutting through 2 metres of engineered Oak sounds like a pain and there's no way that I would get the same acurate cut. £400 spent on a table saw is a lot less than the cost of having a carpenter installing my floor, and will give me a much better result (albeit perhaps not as good as that which the carpenter would do), plus I'll have the tool at my disposal afterwards for my next projects.



Edited By: reakt on Jul 08, 2014 23:27
#4
What is it exactly that you are cutting long lengths for? The edges around the wall? Are you not using quadrant or skirting board? All cut edges should be hidden.

Edited By: Ockingshay on Jul 08, 2014 23:31
#5
I did actually consider this one. A bit more money but more versatile. Is it any good? It struck me as a bit inconvenient to have to flip the thing over to switch between cutting the lengths and the ends of my wood planks (for my floor project). I actually considered hiring this as a local hire shop has one and charges about £40 a day for it. But then with hiring you never know if you're going to get a tool which has been well looked after / maintained or not, and with something like this, you want it to be in good condition so that it cuts accurately.
#6
Ockingshay
A jigsaw cut is a straight as one wants to make it with the preparation. What is it exactly that you are cutting long lengths for? The edges around the wall? Are you not using quadrant or skirting board? All cut edges should be hidden.
Yes but the floor requires a 15mm expansion gap and the skirting is 15mm thick. OK, the expansion gap can be reduced by a millimetre or so but I don't want to push my luck.
#7
Yes, that is a common problem. Solid wood quadrant helps with that, as the wood will shrink in some places and expand in others over its natural life.

I'm only really asking out of curiosity :) I've done plenty of floors now, but if there is a trick I'm missing is nice to know about it.

Are you gluing or using the sticky back underlay?
1 Like #8
Ffx is a good company to deal with, they are one of the biggest online tool company's and have over 150,000 positive feedback on eBay. Folkeston fixings on eBay.
#9
Ockingshay
Yes, that is a common problem. Solid wood quadrant helps with that, as the wood will shrink in some places and expand in others over its natural life.

I'm only really asking out of curiosity :) I've done plenty of floors now, but if there is a trick I'm missing is nice to know about it.

Are you gluing or using the sticky back underlay?
You should refer to my other recent deal ;)
http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/primatech-q500-floor-nailer-172-95-davro-online-1948992
In the past I have floated my engineered floors. This sucker's getting nailed down with secret nails! (Again another tool I probably don't need but a man can never have too many tools you know!).
#10
lol, certainly not your typical build....good luck with it though!
#11
sounds like an overkill and your quote is also very expensive for 20sqm, hope you got a few quotes.
#12
Grand to fit a floor! I'm either in the wrong game or they saw you coming
#13
Interesting post. Heat added
#14
reakt
I did actually consider this one. A bit more money but more versatile. Is it any good? It struck me as a bit inconvenient to have to flip the thing over to switch between cutting the lengths and the ends of my wood planks (for my floor project). I actually considered hiring this as a local hire shop has one and charges about £40 a day for it. But then with hiring you never know if you're going to get a tool which has been well looked after / maintained or not, and with something like this, you want it to be in good condition so that it cuts accurately.

It's a excellent tool to have very powerful. I've ripped down plenty of oak with my 110v version sadly I sold it due to health circumstances & space. I would buy another one in a heartbeat if I could just justify the use (need to find a project). Very easy to flip over look on YouTube you'll bound to find someone showing a demo.
1 Like #15
Ockingshay
lol, certainly not your typical build....good luck with it though!
No offence intended mate but your advice to use quadrant around the edges to hide dodgy cuts would lead to a very amateurish-looking job. Professional fitters do not use quadrant.

Quadrant use
http://www.architecturaljoineryltd.co.uk/images/index/product_range/floor_fitting_products/ffp-lm/ffp-lm-pine-19mmx19mm-quad.jpg

Skirting with properly cut floor underneath and without Quadrant
http://www.infloor.co.uk/images/partnumber/enlarged/%7B6862774F-4A8A-40C0-A76D-EB77C4D03673%7D_skirting.jpg

Edited By: reakt on Jul 09, 2014 06:15
#16
Heat Sink
sounds like an overkill and your quote is also very expensive for 20sqm, hope you got a few quotes.
Yes. To be fair 1000 was the most expensive quote. One guy actually only wanted 200 quid to do it but he didn't know what an undercut saw was (to cut the door frames so the wood can be slid underneath) and told me he normally just cut around door frames and architraves.
#17
A bit of an odd photo choice...one showing a door architrave...which if you look has been done properly by cutting the bottom off and having the wood slid under it and a long wall edge, which again has been done properly by having the cut edge hidden by the skirting board.

Also, the quadrant has been cut properly in that example with the 45degree return to finish the end.....So, not sure what you are trying to show there other than both ways to do the job properly.

The bottom line is to hide the cut and that depends on whether you can get the skirting off :D

Edited By: Ockingshay on Jul 09, 2014 15:57: spelling
#18
If your not going to use the table saw much to warrant the purchase, if you feel confident with a handsaw buy a decent one most chippies would use a standard jack saw. Oak is hardwood buts it's really not that hard to rip down 15mm with a decent handsaw. I've got some 18mm sitting waiting to be fitted in the hallway.
Believe me old oak is much harder to cut especially when it's 800 years old the saws don't last long! Constantly sharpening chisels the stuff is like stone. Green oak is a pleasure to chisel though not great ripping down a 200x200 piece at a length of 3mtrs.
Give it a go you'll be pleasantly surprised how easy it is.
#19
Ockingshay

The bottom line is to hide the cut and that depends on whether you can get the skirting off :D
The skirting will always come off. I think it simply depends more on how much effort somebody wants to put in to install the floor.
#20
Boo, it's gone up to £487!

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