Miele W5740 Washing Machine £795 (includes 10 year warranty) @ John Lewis with trade-in - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit
Firstly ignore the JL £999 on-line price. To get this price ask any John Lewis store to price match the Kingston-on-Thames branch ,which currently has this model priced at £845, which is the cheapest in the country I can find. Miele are offering a £50 trade in on this model, making a total of £795.

This is the Rolls Royce of Washing Machines with 7kg capacity and 1400 spin. Comes with a 10 year warranty. One of the only brands on the market that comes with a stainless steel tub.

Which magazine says this is the best washing machine they have ever tested.
More From John Lewis:

All Comments

(33) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
Remember too: if you buy (on phone) from a store you get the "insurance" of never knowingly undersold for 30 days (from memory) from purchase; whereas if you just buy online then its the price you buy at.
MKD
#2
Great washing machine and it's one of the best. It's very quiet and you won't notice it's on. This is a very good price. Hot!!
#3
7KG ??
oh dear
#4
happyshop
Great washing machine and it's one of the best. It's very quiet and you won't notice it's on. This is a very good price. Hot!!


What is it thats so great about it? Always wanted to ask someone this as they are very expensive compared to other models (my Bosch was less than £300) and I've often wondered why people are willing to pay so much more?
#5
we got one of these: http://www.johnlewis.com/230906953/Product.aspx?source=35735 from JL,

chose it over the miele, cheaper and 6 year warranty, the top of the range miele was £999 at the time so buying the Panasonic for £580 made sense, Awesome washing machine though, huge drum and quiet as a mouse!

Edited By: bigup on Aug 27, 2010 20:08: new link
#6
bigup
we got one of these: http://intelligent-living.panasonic.co.uk/washing-machines/na-168vx2.php from JL,

chose it over the miele, cheaper and 6 year warranty, the top of the range miele was £999 at the time so buying the Panasonic for £580 made sense, Awesome washing machine though, huge drum and quiet as a mouse!


Must be a good machine as it's sold out at the moment.

However, my Bosch has the 8kg drum, senses the size of wash by weighing it so uses miniscule amounts of water, washes 60degree wash in 55 mins, and seems to do exactly the same functions as the Panasonic. The only thing mine doesn't have that the Panasonic does is the 6 year guarantee......but I've had it 7 years now and it's been faultless and only £265.


Edited By: Caz42 on Aug 27, 2010 20:14: Typo
#7
People buy them because a Miele washing machine will probably last 20+ years. Manufacturers don't offer a 10 year warranty lightly, they don't expect to have to honour it!

Edited By: Xadryxil on Aug 27, 2010 20:13: .
#8
Didn't know JL made their own brand washing machines and with a 3 year guarantee too....anyone know who makes them for JL?

Edited By: Caz42 on Aug 27, 2010 20:22: .
2 Likes #9
Great to see a few washing machine nerds out there like me. Here's some reasons why the Miele is the best on the market. Pannys, Bosch's etc. are no comparison

Pump Filter: Loose buttons, coins, and other obstructions are prevented from jamming the water pump by a front filter which is accessible by pulling open a small square panel at the front left of the machine. Uniquely, it's high enough to get a deep tray under which is great, and is designed so that the drop down panel directs the flow of water into the container.

The positioning of this pump filter (the bottom of the filter door is 4 inches off the floor and the top is almost 9 inches off the floor) shows Miele's commitment to function over sheer aesthetics, which in my book deserves praise. Most washing machine manufacturers place the pump filter very low, and many even hide it behind the kick panel (you'd be amazed how many people I come across that don't even know their washing machine has a pump filter) This is clearly prettier in the sense that an ugly pump filter isn't "spoiling" the looks of the washing machine. But if your washing machine gets stuck full of water and you need to get your laundry out you'll find that the price you pay for having one so low is that you cannot get anything but a baking tray under it to drain into. Some are fitted with a small draining tube to try and get round this but it's a very long and fiddley job to drain through such a small tube and often (if the blockage is large) the drain tube simply gets blocked. Miele pump filters allow a deep container underneath to drain easily.

Direct enamel front: Miele are the only washing machine manufacturer I know who use such a thick vitreous enamel coating on the front of all their washing machines (and even on the sides of many models). This coating is, "guaranteed not to corrode or yellow for the life of the machine". People are less likely to fix a washing machine that looks worn out and tatty on the outside even if it's mechanically sound so a washing machine that stays looking great even after 15 years or more is likely to look worth repairing.

Looking closely at the direct enamel finish it has a deep glaze and shine, which simply radiates class. Comparing it with the other white goods appliances in my kitchen (Bosch freezer & Siemens dishwasher) I can clearly see that a normal finish is just a thin layer of paint, which on close inspection looks mottled and is easily marked and scratched. The enamel finish on Miele washing machines looks very smooth close up, its thick coating is so tough that it's impervious to normal scratches and corrosion. Coin test: After seeing a Miele promotional video I decided to conduct a coin damage test (VIDEO: 9.65 meg) of my own. I don't mind admitting I was instinctively worried about doing this, which just feels wrong, but I eventually plucked up enough courage. Taking a pound coin, I was able to strike the Miele washing machine extremely hard several times in a downward motion and it left no trace of any mark. When I did the same on the side of our several year old (ordinary) tumble dryer, with little effort I put several marks upon it which go down to the bare metal (don't tell Mrs Washerhelp).

(Note: Remember, some Miele models have direct enamel on the front and sides, and some models now just have it on the front).

The door: The door is made out of cast metal and chrome and is very solid. It swings smoothly and effortlessly on an equally solid hinge and has a strong metal catch. On the last Miele washing machine I reviewed ( Miele W864 washing machine review ) the door lock that the catch fits into was also made of metal. However, this one is now plastic, which is presumably a little cheaper. I'm confident that Miele would not lower the quality to a detrimental effect, and their tests will have shown it can still stand up to the door being "opened and swung shut 60,000 times".

I can't imagine any of these parts ever breaking. (Context: On many cheaper washing machines the doors, the door hinges and door catches constantly break, and doors can commonly just drop off their hinges and door parts are one of the most common spare parts sold these days).

The only possible criticism of the door arrangement is that it opens the opposite way to virtually all other washing machines I've worked on. This shouldn't (and doesn't) really matter, and in our kitchen it's actually a positive advantage, but we've become so used to washing machine doors opening the other way that it's a little weird at first. The reason Miele do this is for when customers have a Miele tumble dryer and washing machine side by side. Both doors open opposite to each other so that a user crouched down between them emptying the washing machine can easily load the dryer.

Stainless steel outer tub: Miele are one of the few manufacturers to use a stainless steel outer tub. The outer tub holds all the water and the inner drum revolves inside it. In the past, tubs always used to be made of vitreous enamel, which was strong, but susceptible to damage and rusting. Vitreous enamel tubs often started leaking after 10 years or more just through age although commonly because of damage inflicted by coins.

Most washing machine manufacturers have long since moved onto plastic outer tubs. Plastic tubs are cheaper to make, have some insulating properties, and they don't rust, but coins and other obstructions left in pockets can punch a hole right through and commonly do. This will write off most washing machines these days, and as leaving coins in pockets is something most people seem do sooner or later, it's not really ideal to have a plastic tub.

Stainless steel outer tubs are the ideal answer. They are metal, substantial, won't be damaged easily by coins, and will never rust. Apart from the cost, you can't beat a stainless steel tub.

Cast iron tub weight: Most washing machines have one or more blocks of concrete bolted to a plastic outer tub. This is to weigh it down and add stability to the washing machine on spin. The trouble is that bolting something this heavy to plastic is not a good idea and I've also seen hundreds of them come loose (often) causing serious damage to the tub. The stabilizing weights on the Miele washing machine are made of an unbreakable cast iron cradle and they are bolted to a stainless steel tub. To an engineer, this is extremely impressive. It's over 20 years since I saw a washing machine with cast iron tub weights.
#10
Bobbins, thanks for the info but...............you seriously need to get out more mate :D

Edited By: Caz42 on Aug 27, 2010 20:40: .
#11
Caz42
happyshop
Great washing machine and it's one of the best. It's very quiet and you won't notice it's on. This is a very good price. Hot!!
What is it thats so great about it? Always wanted to ask someone this as they are very expensive compared to other models (my Bosch was less than £300) and I've often wondered why people are willing to pay so much more?

why do people by bmw's, mercs and audis rather than pugs, etc

they are robust, very quiet - ours at full spin and can stan d next to the machine and whisper to the person next to me and they can here me with no effort.....you wont with your bosch...my mum has a bosch and its about 1000 times louder...they are made to last
#12
they are robust, very quiet - ours at full spin and can stan d next to the machine and whisper to the person next to me and they can here me with no effort.....you wont with your bosch...my mum has a bosch and its about 1000 times louder...they are made to last...we paid £950 for ours, was £1300-1400 in most shops...did a deal with local euronics shop...cleans well too, unless our old noisy zanussi that sounded like an airliner exploding
#13
Caz42
Didn't know JL made their own brand washing machines and with a 3 year guarantee too....anyone know who makes them for JL?

They are made by the same company that makes them for AEG and Zanussi..no thanks
#14
royals
they are robust, very quiet - ours at full spin and can stan d next to the machine and whisper to the person next to me and they can here me with no effort.....you wont with your bosch...my mum has a bosch and its about 1000 times louder...they are made to last...we paid £950 for ours, was £1300-1400 in most shops...did a deal with local euronics shop...cleans well too, unless our old noisy zanussi that sounded like an airliner exploding


I can have a normal conversation in the same room as my Bosch too.....I'm not in the habit of whispering !! If I'm upstairs I need to come halfway down again and listen carefully for the spin cycle to check if it's finished. Anyway, a machine that operates slightly quieter is not worth 4 times the price of my quiet bosch that has been 100% reliable too.

Only agree with one of your comments, I would never buy a Zanussi either!
#15
Caz42
Bobbins, thanks for the info but...............you seriously need to get out more mate :D
A Dad with young kids, and no gradparents neraby - nuff said!
#16
When we got our first house my girlfriend (now wife) and I bought a Miele top of the range machine. Our neighbours said it was very expensive and bought a cheaper machine. We have both had families and therefore thrashed our machines. She has had 4 machines in that time and we gave our machine away after 19 years because the Miele engineer who replaced the brushes in the motor said the bearings were getting noisy. We replaced it with a new machine 4 years ago but our old one is still going strong! I believe that the single phase motors are the same in their industrial machines.

We will never buy a washing machine other than a Miele - if we ever have to buy one again!

We have just bought a Miele Hoover - as they have similar reputations. That has a 10 year parts and labour warranty as well. Total peace of mind.
#17
hehehehe! You could buy three washing machines for this price, and I bet they'd last longer in total!!! I think they could be playing on their brand name just a little!!! ;-)
#18
weemee002
hehehehe! You could buy three washing machines for this price, and I bet they'd last longer in total!!! I think they could be playing on their brand name just a little!!! ;-)
you could but they'd be bouncing around the kitchen, and you'd have to wear ear plugs during the spin cycle for the next 10 years.

I know this is not a XBOC 360/Nintendo Wii/Sony Play Station 3 (delete as appropriate) for less than £150. This washing machine may not be cheap, but it's bloody good. Go ahead, buy a BEKO!
#19
If its even half as good as their dishwashers, count me in.....
#20
Bobbins
Great to see a few washing machine nerds out there like me. Here's some reasons why the Miele is the best on the market. Pannys, Bosch's etc. are no comparison

Pump Filter: Loose buttons, coins, and other obstructions are prevented from jamming the water pump by a front filter which is accessible by pulling open a small square panel at the front left of the machine. Uniquely, it's high enough to get a deep tray under which is great, and is designed so that the drop down panel directs the flow of water into the container.
Irrelevent - as you state below most machines have a drain hose to empty the water before you unscrew it and they dont get blocked - the only items that can get into this area are items small enough to fit through he drum holes or in the gap between the inner and outer drum.

The positioning of this pump filter (the bottom of the filter door is 4 inches off the floor and the top is almost 9 inches off the floor) shows Miele's commitment to function over sheer aesthetics, which in my book deserves praise. Most washing machine manufacturers place the pump filter very low, and many even hide it behind the kick panel (you'd be amazed how many people I come across that don't even know their washing machine has a pump filter) This is clearly prettier in the sense that an ugly pump filter isn't "spoiling" the looks of the washing machine. But if your washing machine gets stuck full of water and you need to get your laundry out you'll find that the price you pay for having one so low is that you cannot get anything but a baking tray under it to drain into. Some are fitted with a small draining tube to try and get round this but it's a very long and fiddley job to drain through such a small tube and often (if the blockage is large) the drain tube simply gets blocked. Miele pump filters allow a deep container underneath to drain easily.
Why make it ugly if you dont have to ? have you got a top loader ? they are easier to load...

Direct enamel front: Miele are the only washing machine manufacturer I know who use such a thick vitreous enamel coating on the front of all their washing machines (and even on the sides of many models). This coating is, "guaranteed not to corrode or yellow for the life of the machine". People are less likely to fix a washing machine that looks worn out and tatty on the outside even if it's mechanically sound so a washing machine that stays looking great even after 15 years or more is likely to look worth repairing.

Looking closely at the direct enamel finish it has a deep glaze and shine, which simply radiates class. Comparing it with the other white goods appliances in my kitchen (Bosch freezer & Siemens dishwasher) I can clearly see that a normal finish is just a thin layer of paint, which on close inspection looks mottled and is easily marked and scratched. The enamel finish on Miele washing machines looks very smooth close up, its thick coating is so tough that it's impervious to normal scratches and corrosion. Coin test: After seeing a Miele promotional video I decided to conduct a coin damage test (VIDEO: 9.65 meg) of my own. I don't mind admitting I was instinctively worried about doing this, which just feels wrong, but I eventually plucked up enough courage. Taking a pound coin, I was able to strike the Miele washing machine extremely hard several times in a downward motion and it left no trace of any mark. When I did the same on the side of our several year old (ordinary) tumble dryer, with little effort I put several marks upon it which go down to the bare metal (don't tell Mrs Washerhelp).

(Note: Remember, some Miele models have direct enamel on the front and sides, and some models now just have it on the front).

Also note that they dont enamel their tumble dryers, dishwashers or fridge freezers - so they dont match the washer properly, which they should at this price. If enamelling is such a great idea why not do all products? they do this purely because they haven't invested in their factories.

The door: The door is made out of cast metal and chrome and is very solid. It swings smoothly and effortlessly on an equally solid hinge and has a strong metal catch. On the last Miele washing machine I reviewed ( Miele W864 washing machine review ) the door lock that the catch fits into was also made of metal. However, this one is now plastic, which is presumably a little cheaper. I'm confident that Miele would not lower the quality to a detrimental effect, and their tests will have shown it can still stand up to the door being "opened and swung shut 60,000 times".
Siemens and Bosch test theeir doors to 60,000 uses and they are ok even though plastic. The hingle and catch are metal.

I can't imagine any of these parts ever breaking. (Context: On many cheaper washing machines the doors, the door hinges and door catches constantly break, and doors can commonly just drop off their hinges and door parts are one of the most common spare parts sold these days).

The only possible criticism of the door arrangement is that it opens the opposite way to virtually all other washing machines I've worked on. This shouldn't (and doesn't) really matter, and in our kitchen it's actually a positive advantage, but we've become so used to washing machine doors opening the other way that it's a little weird at first. The reason Miele do this is for when customers have a Miele tumble dryer and washing machine side by side. Both doors open opposite to each other so that a user crouched down between them emptying the washing machine can easily load the dryer.
Miele only do this so once you buy one you are stuck with them to buy the other !!
If they followed convention you can still have them opening like this.


Stainless steel outer tub: Miele are one of the few manufacturers to use a stainless steel outer tub. The outer tub holds all the water and the inner drum revolves inside it. In the past, tubs always used to be made of vitreous enamel, which was strong, but susceptible to damage and rusting. Vitreous enamel tubs often started leaking after 10 years or more just through age although commonly because of damage inflicted by coins.

Most washing machine manufacturers have long since moved onto plastic outer tubs. Plastic tubs are cheaper to make, have some insulating properties, and they don't rust, but coins and other obstructions left in pockets can punch a hole right through and commonly do. This will write off most washing machines these days, and as leaving coins in pockets is something most people seem do sooner or later, it's not really ideal to have a plastic tub.

Stainless steel outer tubs are the ideal answer. They are metal, substantial, won't be damaged easily by coins, and will never rust. Apart from the cost, you can't beat a stainless steel tub.
Another result of no factory investment - most brands moved to plastic because it is better and cheaper. outer drum failures are extremely rare on any brand.

Cast iron tub weight: Most washing machines have one or more blocks of concrete bolted to a plastic outer tub. This is to weigh it down and add stability to the washing machine on spin. The trouble is that bolting something this heavy to plastic is not a good idea and I've also seen hundreds of them come loose (often) causing serious damage to the tub. The stabilizing weights on the Miele washing machine are made of an unbreakable cast iron cradle and they are bolted to a stainless steel tub. To an engineer, this is extremely impressive. It's over 20 years since I saw a washing machine with cast iron tub weights.

its the weight that counts - its purely there to keep the washer still - it doesn;t matter whats its made of - and they dont bolt it anymore they glue it to the outer drum - modern technology !!

have you been on a Miele training course and been brainwashed by them ?
seriously though, Miele are a brand struggling to keep up with advancements in white goods, they are not big enough to compete with the likes of BSH and Electrolux. They are in serious decline in the UK and struggling to return a profit as their production techniques are out dated and their volume is dropping which increases unit price

Edited By: checkley73 on Aug 27, 2010 21:54: .
#21
checkly73 - it's probably you who should get out more!
#22
Bobbins
checkly73 - it's probably you who should get out more!


agreed :p
#23
checkley73


have you been on a Miele training course and been brainwashed by them ?
seriously though, Miele are a brand struggling to keep up with advancements in white goods, they are not big enough to compete with the likes of BSH and Electrolux. They are in serious decline in the UK and struggling to return a profit as their production techniques are out dated and their volume is dropping which increases unit price


That's like saying Mercedes haven't moved with the times ..... the best always rises to the top and doesn't always need changing

Edited By: gsloman on Aug 27, 2010 23:07: missed words
#24
Bobbins
weemee002
hehehehe! You could buy three washing machines for this price, and I bet they'd last longer in total!!! I think they could be playing on their brand name just a little!!! ;-)

you could but they'd be bouncing around the kitchen, and you'd have to wear ear plugs during the spin cycle for the next 10 years.

I know this is not a XBOC 360/Nintendo Wii/Sony Play Station 3 (delete as appropriate) for less than £150. This washing machine may not be cheap, but it's bloody good. Go ahead, buy a BEKO!


Beko ;-) I'll pass thanks.... just a middle of the range hotpoint will serve me right!
#25
[/quote]Beko ;-) I'll pass thanks.... just a middle of the range hotpoint will serve me right![/quote]
I'd rather have a BekoX)
#26
gsloman
checkley73


have you been on a Miele training course and been brainwashed by them ?
seriously though, Miele are a brand struggling to keep up with advancements in white goods, they are not big enough to compete with the likes of BSH and Electrolux. They are in serious decline in the UK and struggling to return a profit as their production techniques are out dated and their volume is dropping which increases unit price


That's like saying Mercedes haven't moved with the times ..... the best always rises to the top and doesn't always need changing


mercedes have changed with the times, built new factorys and made themselves a global manufacturer - they dont make all their cars in the origianl german factorys - they build in South Africa and the states too
#27
Bobbins
Caz42
Bobbins, thanks for the info but...............you seriously need to get out more mate :D

A Dad with young kids, and no gradparents neraby - nuff said!


Awww.....I could hug you, bet you're a fab dad though!

I feel like coming round, taking the kids overnight, then throwing your glad rags so you and your OH can go for a lovely meal ...............and whisper sweet nothings about fridge freezers and microwaves :D
#28
royals
...we paid £950 for ours, was £1300-1400 in most shops...did a deal with local euronics shop...
how did you do a deal? did you just ask for some money off? or did you have to prove you could get at a cheaper price somewhere else?
#29
Caz42
Bobbins
Caz42
Bobbins, thanks for the info but...............you seriously need to get out more mate :D
A Dad with young kids, and no gradparents neraby - nuff said!
Awww.....I could hug you, bet you're a fab dad though! I feel like coming round, taking the kids overnight, then throwing your glad rags so you and your OH can go for a lovely meal ...............and whisper sweet nothings about fridge freezers and microwaves :D
......and washing machines, of course.
#30
omg, the door opening the other way, would totally not work for me, thanks **** I read this first thanks
#31
Xadryxil
People buy them because a Miele washing machine will probably last 20+ years. Manufacturers don't offer a 10 year warranty lightly, they don't expect to have to honour it!

Personally, I'd rather buy 3 modern and perfectly adequate machines over 20 years than struggle on with the same one. My current bosch cost me £350. It is now 8 years old and I cannot fault it - and it is tripple A rated too.
Actually, I quite fancy one of those Direct Drive LG's with the team anti-crease systems
#32
Although the Miele deal says £795, "Go to Deal" brings up a price of £949... so can someone please tell me where I can buy one at £795 ?? Hope someone can help me, Sue
#33
Hi there quick question. Is there any w5740 miele washing machine available? The one with 10 year warranty? What's the price?

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Top of Page
Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!