Miele WDA110 Washing Machine 7kg A++ 1400rpm 10 year parts and Labour £723 @ John Lewis - HotUKDeals
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Miele WDA110 Washing Machine 7kg A++ 1400rpm 10 year parts and Labour £723.00 @ John Lewis

£723.00 @ John Lewis
John Lewis are currently among the cheapest retailers offering the WDA110 which gets top rated reviews across the board. There are 3 promotions to take advantage of : £75 cashback.++ Free 5 yea… Read More
JamesSmith Avatar
2y, 4m agoFound 2 years, 4 months ago
John Lewis are currently among the cheapest retailers offering the WDA110 which gets top rated reviews across the board.

There are 3 promotions to take advantage of :

£75 cashback.++
Free 5 year parts and labour.
10 year parts and labour for £149 on selected models.

The net equivalent of just under 20p a day* for 10 years peace of mind, and the pleasure of enjoying Miele performance and class leading engineering!

* £723 / 10 yrs = £72.30 per year / 365 days = 19.8p
++ Offer ends 31st January.

Brand Miele
Model WDA110
Item Weight 94 Kg
Product Dimensions 61 x 59.5 x 85 cm
Standard Capacity Cycle 7 Kilograms
Energy Efficiency A++
Energy Consumption 179 Kilowatt Hours Per Year
Capacity 7 Kilograms
Water Consumption 10560 litres
Annual Energy Consumption 179 Kilowatt Hours Per Year
Annual Water Consumption 10560 litres
Washing Performance Rating A
Maximum Rotational Speed 1400 rpm
Noise Level Washing 54 dB
Noise Level Spinning 77 dB
Noise Level 54 dB
Capacity per washing program 7 Kilograms
Installation Type Freestanding
Part Number WDA110
Special Features Quality guaranteed - For ultimate peace of mind this appliance is engineered and tested to the equivalent of 20 years use / engineered and tested to 20 years equivalent use, HoneyComb Drum, exclusive to Miele - Provides optimum laundry care., Express20 - 20 minute quick wash for when time is of essence, Anti-crease action - Reduces ironing time
Colour White
Number of Option Cycles 10
Number of Standard Cycles 10
Access Location front load
Voltage 230.00
Weight 94 Kilograms
Counter Depth 61 centimetres
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#1
http://i60.tinypic.com/1zn5v8h.png
#2
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.

Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.

It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.
#3
Same price at several retailers including Currys, so what you're basically advertising here is Miele's 5 year extended warranty for £149: https://www.miele.co.uk/promotions/10-Year-Extended-Washing-Machine-Warranty/
1 Like #4
I have literally taken delivery of this exact model this afternoon after retiring our elderly Bosch to Freecycle.

It did it's first "set-up"wash to prepare it for use a few hours ago and it was remarkably quiet in use and on spin especially. Was surprised to find it a bit wet inside before my first use - they apparently test every single one before sending them out.

I've paid a little less than this deal. Got it from Currys, £649, had a 10% discount on top of that (£584.10), and then the cashback to come off that. Mine will end up at £509.10 after cashback.

Everything in this deal (and mine) is by redemption with Miele - the cashback, the free upgrade to 5 years warranty from standard 2 years and the option to pay £149 to get a 10 year warranty.

Delivery was very well organised, it came direct from Miele/Ceva UK, they phoned my mobile and sent texts. They gave me a 4 hour delivery slot and within that 4 hours they also rang me to let me know they were just over an hour away. As I had an 11am to 3pm slot, I was able to stay at work until 12pm and take a 1/2 day - they phoned shortly afterwards to say they'd be there at 1:15pm, and they were.

My only grumble was that they should've unpacked it so I could check for damage, but dropped it off in the kitchen and scarpered after I signed for delivery, leaving me with a load of wood and polystyrene to get rid of (it was very well packed). If i'd had a unit for recycling i'm not sure they'd have hung around long enough to take it away.

Reading through the manual there are a lot of features and protection devices that you just don't find on cheaper washing machines. This washing machine is built like a tank (a very heavy lump to push into it's recess).

OK, so the washing machine is great, but the price of this deal is unremarkable - it's a £799RRP washing machine that everyone sells for £649, and John Lewis charge a £9 for old washer removal (Currys stated that recycling was free). Hot machine, warm price and terms available nigh-on anywhere else.

Edited By: monkeyhanger75 on Jan 08, 2015 18:26: additional info
2 Likes #5
MrRee
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.

Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.

It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.

The cheapest washing machine Currys do is a no-make for £159, with a 1000rpm spin speed (will leave clothes sopping wet), isn't as efficient as the miele with water or electricity and has a 1 year warranty. If you are really unlucky, you will have each one last 2 years and cost £750 for your 5 - it will probably be noisy as hell in use too. highly doubtful that the £159 unit will be boasting any technological advances like the honeycomb drum, smart load sensors that detect a partial load and correspondingly use less water (rather than just pressing a button for 1/2 load). Quality is always worth paying for if you can afford it.

I'd rather have the Miele.

Edited By: monkeyhanger75 on Jan 08, 2015 18:25
#6
I was posting to draw attention to the deal which is time limited promotion various retailers are offering at £649.

If Currys are offering 10% discount on top please do help HotUKDeal readers by posting that deal !

Here's a closer look at the top panel - not many decent pics out there.

https://www.dtest.cz/img/thumb/47311_4f886beb6f.jpg?1408971899
#7
OK so I've just noticed I made a schoolboy error regarding that picture. :p

It should give you a good idea how it looks anyway. ;)
#9
JamesSmith
I was posting to draw attention to the deal which is time limited promotion various retailers are offering at £649.

If Currys are offering 10% discount on top please do help HotUKDeal readers by posting that deal !

Here's a closer look at the top panel - not many decent pics out there.

https://www.dtest.cz/img/thumb/47311_4f886beb6f.jpg?1408971899

The 10% code is gone, it was on between Christmas and New Year, expired New Year's eve, so I paid for mine on the 30th - 9 days to delivery direct from manufacturer.
#10
Just registered for 5 year warranty and £75 cashback to get my unique codes, just need to send in copies of my delivery note as proof of purchase to activate. Seems pretty straightforward.
#11
monkeyhanger75
MrRee
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.
Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.
It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.
The cheapest washing machine Currys do is a no-make for £159, with a 1000rpm spin speed (will leave clothes sopping wet), isn't as efficient as the miele with water or electricity and has a 1 year warranty. If you are really unlucky, you will have each one last 2 years and cost £750 for your 5 - it will probably be noisy as hell in use too. highly doubtful that the £159 unit will be boasting any technological advances like the honeycomb drum, smart load sensors that detect a partial load and correspondingly use less water (rather than just pressing a button for 1/2 load). Quality is always worth paying for if you can afford it.
I'd rather have the Miele.

1000 RPM was considered superb spin speed not so many years ago ..... to state that it will leave clothes sopping wet is totally wrong.

The rest of your post makes some sense ..... you have put your money where your mouth is after all.

I guess, as I'm an Engineer, and can keep machines running long after they should have died the cost equation is different for me.

That said, I don't buy the £159 models ..... I go for the middle ground with Bosch or, currently, Zanussi.

Enjoy your MIELE ....... I may buy one when I retire as that will be my last washing machine in all likelyhood
#12
MrRee
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.

Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.

It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.


I've had 2 Indesit machines, both perfectly adequate. They both failed in the same way. The bit that held the drum fractured as the alloy cast was not up to the job long term. No benefit of improving technology there.

The Miele we have is lovely in comparison. 5 year guarantee, economical, a plethora of programmes and adjustments.

A quiet mode for the sleeping cherub, who fortunately sleeps like a log. .....

Etc etc

Anyway the Miele seems worth the outlay and when I retire I can buy cheap ones again as onr never knows when one won't need something long lasting!
3 Likes #13
Some pics if anyone wants them:-

http://i1083.photobucket.com/albums/j381/monkeyhanger710/Miele1.jpg

http://i1083.photobucket.com/albums/j381/monkeyhanger710/Miele2.jpg

http://i1083.photobucket.com/albums/j381/monkeyhanger710/Miele3.jpg
#14
My experience of Miele, the company that is...been trying to purchase a Miele machine from Currys, can't be delivered to NI by Miele (NI is overseas), I was told today they can't call me on the landline because I'm overseas lol...stroppy, ignorant...not me I'm talking about of course, although I think I'm entitled to be after dealing with them lol.
1 Like #15
MrRee
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.

Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.

It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.


yes but you are forgetting some crucial facts

you'll be lucky if the cheap one lasts 4 years, have zero options, looks and feels cheap, cheap controls, cheap build and very very noisy

you'll have to put up with piece of junk for x years
#16
MrRee
monkeyhanger75
MrRee
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.
Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.
It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.
The cheapest washing machine Currys do is a no-make for £159, with a 1000rpm spin speed (will leave clothes sopping wet), isn't as efficient as the miele with water or electricity and has a 1 year warranty. If you are really unlucky, you will have each one last 2 years and cost £750 for your 5 - it will probably be noisy as hell in use too. highly doubtful that the £159 unit will be boasting any technological advances like the honeycomb drum, smart load sensors that detect a partial load and correspondingly use less water (rather than just pressing a button for 1/2 load). Quality is always worth paying for if you can afford it.
I'd rather have the Miele.

1000 RPM was considered superb spin speed not so many years ago ..... to state that it will leave clothes sopping wet is totally wrong.

The rest of your post makes some sense ..... you have put your money where your mouth is after all.

I guess, as I'm an Engineer, and can keep machines running long after they should have died the cost equation is different for me.

That said, I don't buy the £159 models ..... I go for the middle ground with Bosch or, currently, Zanussi.

Enjoy your MIELE ....... I may buy one when I retire as that will be my last washing machine in all likelyhood


Not many years ago. What 1990
#17
MrRee
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.

Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.

It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.


Yeh good luck with plastic drum and thanks for the landfill. people with your mentality should be taxed heavily
#18
royals
MrRee
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.
Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.
It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.
yes but you are forgetting some crucial facts
you'll be lucky if the cheap one lasts 4 years, have zero options, looks and feels cheap, cheap controls, cheap build and very very noisy
you'll have to put up with piece of junk for x years

All my machines have lasted more than 4 years ..... then I have the ability to repair to stretch that.

And I can assure you that the BOSCH and Zanussi I have now are silent, refined and full of features
#19
royals
MrRee
monkeyhanger75
MrRee
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.
Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.
It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.
The cheapest washing machine Currys do is a no-make for £159, with a 1000rpm spin speed (will leave clothes sopping wet), isn't as efficient as the miele with water or electricity and has a 1 year warranty. If you are really unlucky, you will have each one last 2 years and cost £750 for your 5 - it will probably be noisy as hell in use too. highly doubtful that the £159 unit will be boasting any technological advances like the honeycomb drum, smart load sensors that detect a partial load and correspondingly use less water (rather than just pressing a button for 1/2 load). Quality is always worth paying for if you can afford it.
I'd rather have the Miele.
1000 RPM was considered superb spin speed not so many years ago ..... to state that it will leave clothes sopping wet is totally wrong.
The rest of your post makes some sense ..... you have put your money where your mouth is after all.
I guess, as I'm an Engineer, and can keep machines running long after they should have died the cost equation is different for me.
That said, I don't buy the £159 models ..... I go for the middle ground with Bosch or, currently, Zanussi.
Enjoy your MIELE ....... I may buy one when I retire as that will be my last washing machine in all likelyhood
Not many years ago. What 1990

Maybe 1990, yes .... that's pretty recent to me as I'm ancient!
#20
Simple answer to all the waste created by manufacturers designing products like washing machines to fail after 3 or 4 years - a compulsory warranty of at least 5 (and ideally 10) years, parts and labour included.

Then just watch how long the machines would last, and landfill reduce. :)
#21
royals
MrRee
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.
Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.
It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.
Yeh good luck with plastic drum and thanks for the landfill. people with your mentality should be taxed heavily

Plastic drum? mine has stainless steel ...... actually plastic is probably sensible!

People who buy MIELE's do get taxed heavily and that's how it should be ....... imagine the VAT on that expensive machine?
#22
Hoover have this week announced 10 year guarantees as standard on large kitchen appliances and backdated existing customer guarantees! WOW. Its the way forward and im wandering if this will be standard practice very soon. Lets hope so. Good post + fun reading. Miele or JL machines all the way ;)
#23
mr ree what make washer dryer would you recomend if any thanks
#24
char7ie2008
Hoover have this week announced 10 year guarantees as standard on large kitchen appliances and backdated existing customer guarantees! WOW. Its the way forward and im wandering if this will be standard practice very soon. Lets hope so. Good post + fun reading. Miele or JL machines all the way ;)
Hoover? I wouldn't reckon on their machines lasting 3 years without a breakdown! Do you have a link to that? :|
#25
MrRee
royals
MrRee
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.
Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.
It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.
Yeh good luck with plastic drum and thanks for the landfill. people with your mentality should be taxed heavily

Plastic drum? mine has stainless steel ...... actually plastic is probably sensible!

People who buy MIELE's do get taxed heavily and that's how it should be ....... imagine the VAT on that expensive machine?


I'm not sure you grasp percentages.
#26
steevojohno
mr ree what make washer dryer would you recomend if any thanks

Washer/driers are inherently unreliable in general - if you have the room i'd have one of each. You don't need an especially expensive drier, controls are basic and spin speeds are very low - no complicated plumbing either.

If you haven't the room for one of each i'd go for something still built the way German cars used to be, with the confidence of a long warranty - it'd be Miele again.
#27
MrRee
royals
MrRee
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.
Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.
It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.
Yeh good luck with plastic drum and thanks for the landfill. people with your mentality should be taxed heavily

Plastic drum? mine has stainless steel ...... actually plastic is probably sensible!

People who buy MIELE's do get taxed heavily and that's how it should be ....... imagine the VAT on that expensive machine?

Plastic isn't at all a good idea for a drum - plastic expands and contracts noticeably within the temperature range a washing machine can go through, ,not good for tight engineering tolerances, the plastic would have to be pretty thick to be as strong as that steel drum to withstand being spun at speed with a 6/7/8Kg load plus the extra weight of the water. What is it you engineer? Houses of cards perhaps?

Edited By: monkeyhanger75 on Jan 09, 2015 06:35
#28
MrRee
royals
MrRee
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.
yes but you are forgetting some crucial factsyou'll be lucky if the cheap one lasts 4 years, have zero options, looks and feels cheap, cheap controls, cheap build and very very noisyyou'll have to put up with piece of junk for x years
All my machines have lasted more than 4 years ..... then I have the ability to repair to stretch that.And I can assure you that the BOSCH and Zanussi I have now are silent, refined and full of features

So you are saying buying a £150 machine multiple times is the way to go and then say you have Bosch and Zanussi machines that even if they were bottom of the range for those brands would still be in the region of £300?
#29
The missus put on a full load last night using the shortest cycle (20 mins/40C) and was impressed with the results.
2 Likes #30
char7ie2008
Hoover have this week announced 10 year guarantees as standard on large kitchen appliances and backdated existing customer guarantees! WOW. Its the way forward and im wandering if this will be standard practice very soon. Lets hope so. Good post + fun reading. Miele or JL machines all the way ;)

Knowing Hoover it will be parts only, along with a hefty bill for labour.
#31
We've got a great AEG washing machine that sells for over £700 - That's the price you pay if you're a badge snob and want a rebranded Electrolux :D
#33
steevojohno
mr ree what make washer dryer would you recomend if any thanks

I wouldn't ..... always buy separates .......
#34
monkeyhanger75
MrRee
royals
MrRee
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.
Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.
It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.
Yeh good luck with plastic drum and thanks for the landfill. people with your mentality should be taxed heavily
Plastic drum? mine has stainless steel ...... actually plastic is probably sensible!
People who buy MIELE's do get taxed heavily and that's how it should be ....... imagine the VAT on that expensive machine?
Plastic isn't at all a good idea for a drum - plastic expands and contracts noticeably within the temperature range a washing machine can go through, ,not good for tight engineering tolerances, the plastic would have to be pretty thick to be as strong as that steel drum to withstand being spun at speed with a 6/7/8Kg load plus the extra weight of the water. What is it you engineer? Houses of cards perhaps?
You are clearly not an Engineer at all? Maybe a Banker?
#35
theshabster
char7ie2008
Hoover have this week announced 10 year guarantees as standard on large kitchen appliances and backdated existing customer guarantees! WOW. Its the way forward and im wandering if this will be standard practice very soon. Lets hope so. Good post + fun reading. Miele or JL machines all the way ;)


Knowing Hoover it will be parts only, along with a hefty bill for labour.


That is exactly what it is, a parts only warranty, to be fitted by their engineers who will charge an arm and a leg.:(
#36
Usual Hoover trick ..... they will get their money off you for any repair!
#37
MrRee
monkeyhanger75
MrRee
royals
MrRee
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.
Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.
It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.
Yeh good luck with plastic drum and thanks for the landfill. people with your mentality should be taxed heavily
Plastic drum? mine has stainless steel ...... actually plastic is probably sensible!
People who buy MIELE's do get taxed heavily and that's how it should be ....... imagine the VAT on that expensive machine?
Plastic isn't at all a good idea for a drum - plastic expands and contracts noticeably within the temperature range a washing machine can go through, ,not good for tight engineering tolerances, the plastic would have to be pretty thick to be as strong as that steel drum to withstand being spun at speed with a 6/7/8Kg load plus the extra weight of the water. What is it you engineer? Houses of cards perhaps?
You are clearly not an Engineer at all? Maybe a Banker?

I am a Chemist by education, with a heavy emphasis on biotech and chemical engineering, used to fix all my own cars - before they became so computerised, although would still have a go at a purely mechanical issue away from the drive-train. I currently investigate technical issues on complex pharmaceutical high speed tablet compression machines and automated packing lines as part of my job - I am technically competent and handy with many things.

You might be able to fix a few things, but by your plastic drum suggestion, you have given no consideration to any material science principles. There are many good reasons why stainless steel is used for washing machines and tumble driers when considering the operational parameters such as temperature range (affecting tensile strength, toughness, rigidity, expansion/contraction of materials), static load, spun load, centrifugal forces etc. A plastic drum on a washing machine (even a £150 one) would be as much use as a chocolate teapot. A carbon fibre drum might be a viable alternative if the cost were not so prohibitive.

Regardless of my background, most people with their fair share of common sense would conclude that plastic washing machine drums are not the way forward, especially as no-one has developed one that works and put it in their own range of machines.



Edited By: monkeyhanger75 on Jan 10, 2015 17:34: additional wisdom :P
#38
The washing we've done after experimenting with a few cycles has impressed - the 1hr 12min "Denim" cycle is great and will save a fair bit in energy usage over the old machine - the cycle is almost 1/2 the duration, using 40% less water and the clothes took just over 1/2 the normal time in the tumble drier.
#39
monkeyhanger75
MrRee
monkeyhanger75
MrRee
royals
MrRee
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.
Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.
It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.
Yeh good luck with plastic drum and thanks for the landfill. people with your mentality should be taxed heavily
Plastic drum? mine has stainless steel ...... actually plastic is probably sensible!
People who buy MIELE's do get taxed heavily and that's how it should be ....... imagine the VAT on that expensive machine?
Plastic isn't at all a good idea for a drum - plastic expands and contracts noticeably within the temperature range a washing machine can go through, ,not good for tight engineering tolerances, the plastic would have to be pretty thick to be as strong as that steel drum to withstand being spun at speed with a 6/7/8Kg load plus the extra weight of the water. What is it you engineer? Houses of cards perhaps?
You are clearly not an Engineer at all? Maybe a Banker?
I am a Chemist by education, with a heavy emphasis on biotech and chemical engineering, used to fix all my own cars (before they became so computerised, although would still have a go at a purely mechanical issue away from the drivetrain), currently investigate technical issues on complex pharmaceutical compression machines and automated packing lines as part of my job - I am technically competent and handy with many things.
You might be able to fix a few things, but by your plastic drum suggestion, you have given no consideration to any material science principles. There are many good reasons why stainless steel is used for washing machines and tumble driers when considering the operational parameters such as temperature range (affecting tensile strength, toughness, rigidity, expansion/contraction of materials), static load, spun load, centrifugal forces etc. A plastic drum on a washing machine (even a £150 one) would be as much use as a chocolate teapot. A carbon fibre drum might be a viable alternative if the cost were not so prohibitive.

That's probably where we differ ..... I am on the edge of Technology, you cannot get more advanced than the Engineering I deal with.

I know, and I'm surprised you don't, that plastics these days have moved on hugely - you could be stuck in the 60's, 70's or 80's maybe?

Do you believe that thin stainless steel doesn't expand and contract? Plastics, the ones used in the washing machine environment, are brilliantly suitable for that use ..... hardly a chocolate teapot - a statement that is laughable and shows an amazing lack of material science knowledge (or should I say up-to-date knowledge?)
#40
MrRee
monkeyhanger75
MrRee
monkeyhanger75
MrRee
royals
MrRee
I like the principle of buying quality .... but, washing machines can be had for around £150 each now.
Yes, they will last maybe 4 years and then be disposed of ..... so in 10 years you will have had 2 1/2 machines and taken advantage of any changes in technology over that time.
It will have cost you £375 over those same 10 years ...... quality sometimes doesn't actually make sense, I wish it did.
Yeh good luck with plastic drum and thanks for the landfill. people with your mentality should be taxed heavily
Plastic drum? mine has stainless steel ...... actually plastic is probably sensible!
People who buy MIELE's do get taxed heavily and that's how it should be ....... imagine the VAT on that expensive machine?
Plastic isn't at all a good idea for a drum - plastic expands and contracts noticeably within the temperature range a washing machine can go through, ,not good for tight engineering tolerances, the plastic would have to be pretty thick to be as strong as that steel drum to withstand being spun at speed with a 6/7/8Kg load plus the extra weight of the water. What is it you engineer? Houses of cards perhaps?
You are clearly not an Engineer at all? Maybe a Banker?
I am a Chemist by education, with a heavy emphasis on biotech and chemical engineering, used to fix all my own cars (before they became so computerised, although would still have a go at a purely mechanical issue away from the drivetrain), currently investigate technical issues on complex pharmaceutical compression machines and automated packing lines as part of my job - I am technically competent and handy with many things.
You might be able to fix a few things, but by your plastic drum suggestion, you have given no consideration to any material science principles. There are many good reasons why stainless steel is used for washing machines and tumble driers when considering the operational parameters such as temperature range (affecting tensile strength, toughness, rigidity, expansion/contraction of materials), static load, spun load, centrifugal forces etc. A plastic drum on a washing machine (even a £150 one) would be as much use as a chocolate teapot. A carbon fibre drum might be a viable alternative if the cost were not so prohibitive.

That's probably where we differ ..... I am on the edge of Technology, you cannot get more advanced than the Engineering I deal with.

I know, and I'm surprised you don't, that plastics these days have moved on hugely - you could be stuck in the 60's, 70's or 80's maybe?

Do you believe that thin stainless steel doesn't expand and contract? Plastics, the ones used in the washing machine environment, are brilliantly suitable for that use ..... hardly a chocolate teapot - a statement that is laughable and shows an amazing lack of material science knowledge (or should I say up-to-date knowledge?)

So why aren't there any washing machine drums made of plastic out there? You will find very few plastics used in the washing machine that have a hard time physically, getting spun, with or without load - not in the drum or the motor, pretty much just the plumbing, parts of the casing and the control panel. Are you working on some super top-secret "stealth" washing machine that no-one else knows about, with an all plastic drum?

Plastics have their place, but as the primary material for a drum spinning at high speed for prolonged periods with off-centre wet loads of around 12kg in temperatures of 20C to 90C? You are having a laugh, Mr cutting edge of technology.

Please tell me it is what your company designs/makes so I can avoid it - I suspect the long term reliability of any products is hideous with your way of thinking at the helm. You imply you are involved with the high end of technology yet suggest people buy in at the bottom end with a technologically primitive £150 washing machine? Something smells a bit fishy there.

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