Morrisons Own Brand AA Batteries 60 for a £1!!!! - HotUKDeals
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first post from me :)

went to morrisons today and morrsions own brand batteries was 20x aa for a £1 and it was also BUY 1 AND GET 2 FREE so thats 60 aa batteries for a £1!!!!
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7y, 2m agoFound 7 years, 2 months ago
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#1
Great price-heat added.
#2
good deal, especially for all those christmas toys


http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh131/s_wenick/Welcome/Welcome-GoldBorder.gif to hukd
#3
a great price, BUT a crap battery. Just like the ones in £ shops etc. Wont last 5mins
#4
not worth it just for inconvenience of changing them, more chance of braking the mechanism on back of remote with increased useage!
banned#5
60 for a £ ! Someone take me to Morrisons !
#6
Are they Zinc or Alkaline? If they are Alkaline, Morrisons alkaline batts are one of the best out there!
#7
I'm sure this was posted some time ago?

Found this one
http://www.hotukdeals.com/item/491273/20-x-aa-batteries-99p-bogof-40-batt
But as i said i'm sure i remember there being a BOG2F aswell as i remember buying some after seeing it.Maybe it got expired so isn't showing up?
#8
20 for a £1 BOGOF makes 40 not 60 :thumbsup:Oh and they anre not even alakaline :p
#9
santasmissus;6944251
20 for a £1 BOGOF makes 40 not 60 :thumbsup:Oh and they anre not even alakaline :p


Read the OP again.. might not be alkaline though.
#10
BUY 1 AND GET 2 FREE


20 for a £1 BOGOF makes 40 not 60


Yes, BOGOF would mean 40 batteries, but OP didn't say BOGOF.
#11
Might pick some of these up.

Tried the cheap ones from B&M and they err.. suck sorta.

Bought 40 for £1.78 and they lasted a month.

Not bad tho i suppose still
#12
When a battery in one of the products we use fails, we simply run out and buy a replacement. The dead battery ends up in the garbage and no one thinks about where it goes and what happens to it after the garbage is picked up.

Sealed inside these alkaline cells are harmful materials which are not encountered by consumers during normal use. However, when the batteries enter a landfill, the casings can be crushed, or can easily degrade, which causes mercury and other toxins to leach into the environment.

The problem of batteries in landfills is one of the easiest to solve. Using rechargeable power can significantly reduce the number of batteries which end up in landfills. Rechargeable batteries can be used again and again, up to 1,000 times. One rechargeable cell can replace up to 300 throwaway batteries, keeping the landfill free not only from the batteries themselves, but also from the paper and plastic materials that are used to package them.

There are a number of manufacturers in the country today who deal in rechargeable products and some of them have a number of programs already in place to ensure that rechargeable batteries never enter a landfill at all. For example, one of the largest manufacturers of rechargeable products is now offering a lifetime replacement guarantee on all round cells. If the product ever fails to accept or hold a charge, the company will promptly replace it and recycle the used cell.
#13
Unbelievable deal. Voted hot.
#14
seems too good to be true, will try and buy 60!! tomorrow
#15
if you buy these you are completely mad. Such a waste to bring to a landfill
#16
ReflexReact
seems too good to be true, will try and buy 60!! tomorrow


I was thinking the same thing. I'll be getting A LOT more than 60 if this is genuine. With Christmas coming up (and all the kids toys that are gonna need batteries) batteries at this price are a Godsend!
#17
shadowdogg
if you buy these you are completely mad. Such a waste to bring to a landfill


I've never found a rechargeable battery YET, that has kept a consistent charge time after time (that 1000 times is ballox!) which is why I always return to disposable ones.
#18
sharkalos
When a battery in one of the products we use fails, we simply run out and buy a replacement. The dead battery ends up in the garbage and no one thinks about where it goes and what happens to it after the garbage is picked up.

Sealed inside these alkaline cells are harmful materials which are not encountered by consumers during normal use. However, when the batteries enter a landfill, the casings can be crushed, or can easily degrade, which causes mercury and other toxins to leach into the environment.

The problem of batteries in landfills is one of the easiest to solve. Using rechargeable power can significantly reduce the number of batteries which end up in landfills. Rechargeable batteries can be used again and again, up to 1,000 times. One rechargeable cell can replace up to 300 throwaway batteries, keeping the landfill free not only from the batteries themselves, but also from the paper and plastic materials that are used to package them.

There are a number of manufacturers in the country today who deal in rechargeable products and some of them have a number of programs already in place to ensure that rechargeable batteries never enter a landfill at all. For example, one of the largest manufacturers of rechargeable products is now offering a lifetime replacement guarantee on all round cells. If the product ever fails to accept or hold a charge, the company will promptly replace it and recycle the used cell.



hear hear... dont see how this can be good news. save ur money peeps and get some rechargeables!!
#19
sharkalos
When a battery in one of the products we use fails, we simply run out and buy a replacement. The dead battery ends up in the garbage and no one thinks about where it goes and what happens to it after the garbage is picked up.

Sealed inside these alkaline cells are harmful materials which are not encountered by consumers during normal use. However, when the batteries enter a landfill, the casings can be crushed, or can easily degrade, which causes mercury and other toxins to leach into the environment.

The problem of batteries in landfills is one of the easiest to solve. Using rechargeable power can significantly reduce the number of batteries which end up in landfills. Rechargeable batteries can be used again and again, up to 1,000 times. One rechargeable cell can replace up to 300 throwaway batteries, keeping the landfill free not only from the batteries themselves, but also from the paper and plastic materials that are used to package them.

There are a number of manufacturers in the country today who deal in rechargeable products and some of them have a number of programs already in place to ensure that rechargeable batteries never enter a landfill at all. For example, one of the largest manufacturers of rechargeable products is now offering a lifetime replacement guarantee on all round cells. If the product ever fails to accept or hold a charge, the company will promptly replace it and recycle the used cell.

I agree with your point, rechargeables are better even if it's just in terms of the money saved, but from what I've heard alkaline batteries are nowhere near this bad a problem...

All (at least nearly all) alkaline batteries have contained no mercury for years, should say "0% mercury" on them. Rechargeable batteries are actually more harmful than alkalines if thrown away, that's why they have the "don't throw away" logo on them, unlike alkalines. Plus you can always recycle your alkaline batteries anyway. :)

There are some places where rechargeables don't really make sense, e.g. clocks and remote controls, where batteries last so long that rechargeable Ni-mhs would go flat by themselves in a less than a month. The solution is hybrio/eneloop batteries which last a few years instead, but these are too expensive at the moment.

shadowdogg
if you buy these you are completely mad. Such a waste to bring to a landfill

Take them to a place that recycles them then. I think most robert dyas stores do. As well as most dumps / "household waste sites".

Agreed you are mad to buy them though if they are zinc carbon, really will last no time at all if that's the case.
#20
Hot, lets hope they dont blow up!
#21
rufus bezak
I've never found a rechargeable battery YET, that has kept a consistent charge time after time (that 1000 times is ballox!) which is why I always return to disposable ones.


Buy decent ones (Eneloops seems pretty good) and steer clear of crap chargers (find something like the higher end Ansmann chargers - or Lidl/Aldi do decent ones at times).

Fast chargers kill them, as do crap timer based ones. Get one that does proper temp and deltaV detection and decent cells will last for a *long* time. If it can charge an AA cell quicker than 4 hours then it's a fast charger IMO.

These cells from Morrisons are crap zinc ones - they won't last 2 mins in many kids toys. I'd avoid personally no matter how cheap...

Darren
#22
dmchapman
Buy decent ones (Eneloops seems pretty good) and steer clear of crap chargers (find something like the higher end Ansmann chargers - or Lidl/Aldi do decent ones at times).

Fast chargers kill them, as do crap timer based ones. Get one that does proper temp and deltaV detection and decent cells will last for a *long* time. If it can charge an AA cell quicker than 4 hours then it's a fast charger IMO.

These cells from Morrisons are crap zinc ones - they won't last 2 mins in many kids toys. I'd avoid personally no matter how cheap...

Darren


Worse still if they leak, I`ve had many a cheap battery do this. 6 months in and the Eneloops are going strong :)

.
#23
Not exactly enviromentally friendly are they !!

Why not do your bit and but a few rechargeables ,cant exactly see them lasting long at 1.5p each !
#24
i bought some last time they were bogof. seem fine to me.

also i have loads of rechargables (but some things they dont work with rechargables such as the tv remote control and the carbon monoxide alarm). dont ask me why they dont but in these cases these cheap ones do the trick.

they last a while too - i use them in my little girls toys and they are fine (guess they may not be good in something using a lot of power)
#25
geordie_lass21;6946454
also i have loads of rechargables (but some things they dont work with rechargables such as the tv remote control and the carbon monoxide alarm).
For which you should use alkaline disposables, not this rubbish.
#26
Cheap zinc-carbon rubbish. Not really very useful for anything and will leak very quickly - cheap alkalines or rechargables are a much better idea for 90% of the things that need batteries.

If you are after batteries for a medium to high drain product then stay well clear of these!
#27
I got these a few weeks ago they are dreadful. Put them in my electric toothbrush and after only 4 or 5 days they ran down. I would not buy them again however cheap they were.
#28
High time the EU banned these things to protect everyone from the environmental damage done by the stupidity of the people who buy them, and the financial damage done to those people. They are the loan sharks of the battery world. It's not a case of making do with these if you can't afford better; they are so patently a false economy that that excuse simply doesn't wash.
#29
I got these at the same price a while back ... have used about 8 out of the 60 so far ... work as expected from these types. Hot deal!!!

Oh, and good 1st post shop_hunter ... hope you don't get put off my the environmentalists and stop posting ... each to their own opinion which I do like to see :thumbsup:
#30
Waste of a pound, these sort of batteries shouldnt be made, bad for the environment. Buy some batteries that will last as long as all 60 of these, if not longer. Or some recharchables.
#31
rufus bezak;6944657
I've never found a rechargeable battery YET, that has kept a consistent charge time after time (that 1000 times is ballox!) which is why I always return to disposable ones.


New techology type (Eneloop/Hybrio/ReCycko/Instants - currently paying no more than £10.50 for 8xAAs) with a moderately decent charger, although just about any will get you by, are JUST like having disposables, they keep most of their charge and are ready to sue out of the drawer, unlike standard ones. So charge them when you take them out, then put them away and they will be useable months late.

I have not bought or used a single disposable battery this year, whereas before, I always had spares in the drawer!

OK, who knows if they are going to last 1000 times?
SO WHAT!.. you will more than have had many times your money back long before that!
#32
geordie_lass21;6946454

also i have loads of rechargables (but some things they dont work with rechargables such as the tv remote control and the carbon monoxide alarm). dont ask me why they dont but in these cases these cheap ones do the trick.



See my last post... this argument is LONG dead
banned#33
santasmissus
20 for a £1 BOGOF makes 40 not 60 :thumbsup:Oh and they anre not even alakaline :p


great - they will all have drained by christmas dinner

just because somthing is cheap doesnt make it a bargain
#34
I think these are OK for certain products.

I bought some zinc ones from Poundland, put them in Mrs V's cheapo camera, and they lasted only a few shots with flash. When I checked them they had plenty of charge but not enough for high drain devices. They are OK where power isn't drained quickly such as clocks etc.
#35
I got some of these last time and they run out very quickly - ok for a small wall clock. But I wouldn't buy them again.
#36
vikingaero;6947862
They are OK where power isn't drained quickly such as clocks etc.
Do you have 60 clocks then?
#37
vikingaero;6947862
They are OK where power isn't drained quickly such as clocks etc.


Cheap batteries certainly DRAIN ok... when they leak :-(
1 Like #38
sharkalos
When a battery in one of the products we use fails, we simply run out and buy a replacement. The dead battery ends up in the garbage and no one thinks about where it goes and what happens to it after the garbage is picked up.

Sealed inside these alkaline cells are harmful materials which are not encountered by consumers during normal use. However, when the batteries enter a landfill, the casings can be crushed, or can easily degrade, which causes mercury and other toxins to leach into the environment.

The problem of batteries in landfills is one of the easiest to solve. Using rechargeable power can significantly reduce the number of batteries which end up in landfills. Rechargeable batteries can be used again and again, up to 1,000 times. One rechargeable cell can replace up to 300 throwaway batteries, keeping the landfill free not only from the batteries themselves, but also from the paper and plastic materials that are used to package them.

There are a number of manufacturers in the country today who deal in rechargeable products and some of them have a number of programs already in place to ensure that rechargeable batteries never enter a landfill at all. For example, one of the largest manufacturers of rechargeable products is now offering a lifetime replacement guarantee on all round cells. If the product ever fails to accept or hold a charge, the company will promptly replace it and recycle the used cell.


Whats the problem with dumping it all in the ground? The zinc in the batteries must have come out of the ground in the first place.
#39
sharkalos
When a battery in one of the products we use fails, we simply run out and buy a replacement. The dead battery ends up in the garbage and no one thinks about where it goes and what happens to it after the garbage is picked up.

Sealed inside these alkaline cells are harmful materials which are not encountered by consumers during normal use. However, when the batteries enter a landfill, the casings can be crushed, or can easily degrade, which causes mercury and other toxins to leach into the environment.

The problem of batteries in landfills is one of the easiest to solve. Using rechargeable power can significantly reduce the number of batteries which end up in landfills. Rechargeable batteries can be used again and again, up to 1,000 times. One rechargeable cell can replace up to 300 throwaway batteries, keeping the landfill free not only from the batteries themselves, but also from the paper and plastic materials that are used to package them.

There are a number of manufacturers in the country today who deal in rechargeable products and some of them have a number of programs already in place to ensure that rechargeable batteries never enter a landfill at all. For example, one of the largest manufacturers of rechargeable products is now offering a lifetime replacement guarantee on all round cells. If the product ever fails to accept or hold a charge, the company will promptly replace it and recycle the used cell.


Really well put in my opinion, I try to have mainly rechargeables, but still have some quality alkalines (like duracell plus) I find it's better for slow drain devices like clocks and the remote for the telly etc.

If however something was done to kill of the import of these really cheap, low power batteries like these, maybe enerloops and the like would be the norm and therefore mass produced more and therefore cheaper than around £5 for 4.

Blimey don't tell the energy companies otherwsie this could be their next marketing gimmik! "Sign up to dual fuel xyz tarrif and get 16 free enerloops? Who knows.
#40
maddoglewis;6952509
Whats the problem with dumping it all in the ground? The zinc in the batteries must have come out of the ground in the first place.
Because huge amounts of energy in the form of finite fossil fuels, realeasing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, have been used to get that zinc out of the ground, transport it, turn it into a battery, and dispose of it after the short-sighted user has used it to provide a minuscule amount of energy. The place where the zinc is extracted is damaged, and the place where it is disposed of is damaged.

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