Muddyfox Milano Hybrid Bike Argos £179.99 - HotUKDeals
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Muddyfox Milano Hybrid Bike Argos £179.99

£179.99 @ Argos
£380 in Halfords - so really good deal! Colour of frame maroon. 16 Shimano gears. Gear type EZ fire. Front brakes calliper. Rear brakes calliper. Frame type diamond. Frame mate… Read More
cathys1 Avatar
7y, 4m agoFound 7 years, 4 months ago
£380 in Halfords - so really good deal!

Colour of frame maroon.

16 Shimano gears.

Gear type EZ fire.

Front brakes calliper.

Rear brakes calliper.

Frame type diamond.

Frame material alloy.

Active comfort saddle, flat handlebars, rear carrier rack, front and rear mudguards.

Tyres style touring.

Frame size 53cm (21in).

Wheel size 28in.

Suitable for leg measurement 65 to 90cm.

For ages 14 years and over.

Lifetime frame manufacturer's guarantee for first owner
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cathys1 Avatar
7y, 4m agoFound 7 years, 4 months ago
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#2
Thanks - Have ordered one for Grandad..
#3
Good bike if you want a commute fast and don't want dropped bars. Frame is 7005 which is very good at this price, Sora gears are definitely good even at £300 price point.

Wont be to everyone's taste as it looks old fashioned, but its a good bike.
#4
For ages 14 Years and over.......... more like 65 Years and over!
#5
This is a fantastic bike for the price, great specs. Have been looking for one of these for a long time, but the price was too high. Reserved, but be quick very few still available
#6
Kevo2k7
For ages 14 Years and over.......... more like 65 Years and over!


Or if you're like me, a five mile commute by car takes around 30mins or by a similar bike to this in 15 minutes. The bike shed at work is crammed with similar bikes, there's only one bike with dropped bars and that's an old raleigh racer.
Only an idiot would ride a mountain bike with it's tiny 26inch wheels and low gearing on the road, a hybrid is far more versatile, not to mention it already has mudguards and a rack which mtbs don't come with.
#7
Hi there, had a look on the interweb & could'nt find any reviews, apart from Argos:whistling: . Has anyone managed to find any. Thanks
banned 1 Like #8
I am currently looking for a bike, but im actually looking for a BMX. Oh, im 36 years old and yes, i am going through my midlife crisis.
#9
It's a 21" frame so if you're below about 6 foot ish this bike will not fit you.

Only an idiot would ride a mountain bike with it's tiny 26inch wheels and low gearing on the road


Not true that. Just chuck a set of slicks on your mountain bike and it's fine. To be honest, if you're into mountain biking and therefore have a mountain bike, riding it on the road seems fairly logical as it saves you having to buy a high spec hybrid.

With a set of slicks and a good mountain bike, you could probably go as fast as a bike like the one in this deal. There are some people out there too remember that have carbon fibre mountain bikes although they'd be unlikely to take these on a commute.
#10
[QUOTE=sotomonkey]It's a 21" frame so if you're below about 6 foot ish this bike will not fit you.



Well dh is 5ft 3 and he fits on ok!
#11
Why is this so expensive? You can get other bikes for upwards of £50 with suspension and disc brakes etc (albeit cheap made in China ones).

This bike has none of those yet is £180. I am not a clued up bikey, I am just asking a question before anyone gets sensitive and thinks I am attacking anyone.
#12
Looks like a good deal for a decent bike to use on road for someone mature enough to value performance over image. Didn't know they still do caliper brakes though - could be a weak point?

21" frame and 28" wheels will be for the bigger rider but you can't compare directly with similar on mountain bikes. I'm not so sure you need to be "6 footish" for this one. Anyone care to comment?
#13
Why is this so expensive? You can get other bikes for upwards of £50 with suspension and disc brakes etc (albeit cheap made in China ones).


Because those things are horrible. Heavy steel frames, maybe upto about 25kg!,crap components that sometimes fall apart in a couple of weeks. Just very shoddy.

And forget rear suspension or disc brakes at that price. Real rear suspension bikes start at about £800. And you can't get a set of decent front forks for under about £150, let alone the bike.

As for disc brakes, you won't find a proper bike with disc brakes for less than about £300.
#14
Besford
Looks like a good deal for a decent bike to use on road for someone mature enough to value performance over image. Didn't know they still do caliper brakes though - could be a weak point?

21" frame and 28" wheels will be for the bigger rider but you can't compare directly with similar on mountain bikes. I'm not so sure you need to be "6 footish" for this one. Anyone care to comment?


The size of the wheels is pretty irrelevant. Unless you've got very long legs, If you're around 5foot 7 to about 5foot 11, you need a smaller frame.
#15
Besford
Looks like a good deal for a decent bike to use on road for someone mature enough to value performance over image. Didn't know they still do caliper brakes though - could be a weak point?

21" frame and 28" wheels will be for the bigger rider but you can't compare directly with similar on mountain bikes. I'm not so sure you need to be "6 footish" for this one. Anyone care to comment?


Yeah 21" frame should be for people around 6ft and over.

The poster above who said her 5ft 3 husband riding this - well he needs a much smaller bike. Maybe a 15" or 17" at a push.
#16
sotomonkey
The size of the wheels is pretty irrelevant. Unless you've got very long legs, If you're around 5foot 7 to about 5foot 11, you need a smaller frame.


Not necessarily, personal preference plays an important role in picking size.

Some mountain-bike riders seem to think that they need to have their seat a foot higher than the bars.

The 28 inch wheels add an inch to the standover height of the frame btw

I'll not vote on this one, Muddy-Fox is a terrible brand, their bikes are made under license and the quality is relatively poor compared to "bigger" brands
#17
msharif911
Why is this so expensive? You can get other bikes for upwards of £50 with suspension and disc brakes etc (albeit cheap made in China ones).

This bike has none of those yet is £180. I am not a clued up bikey, I am just asking a question before anyone gets sensitive and thinks I am attacking anyone.

Uh oh, here we go! Reasonable question but I fear you've just woken up every Lycra Lout who is now going to tell you anything under £3000 is rubbish.

There have been many long threads on this subject on here. In summary I think the balanced view would be that very cheap bikes are incredible value for what you get but probably won't be nice to ride and quality/durability is very suspect. Probably fine for an ocassional ride for the non-enthusiast and better than spending a lot if it's just going to fill your shed. If you get one you'll quickly want to give up cycling or buy something better, but it's a cheap way of trying the activity. If you do buy a cheap one get a basic bike (no suspension, etc) so that at least the bits you get may be a bit better quality.

Something like this deal (not necessarily this bike - I don't know it) is likely to be a good balance between cost, quality and performance for an 'ordinary' cyclist. In this case it's a decent bike for road use/commuting if you're not interested in impressing the neighbours (as if they would be anyway). Adding a rack and mudguards to a bike without them could easily add £40-£50 plus labour if you can't do it yourself so it's worth bearing these in mind too.

Start spending a lot more and you're into the law of diminishing returns - ie it will be better in some ways but each extra pound buys you less and less extra bike. Weight is one of the holy grails, hence people will pay mega money for carbon fibre, etc. Back in the real world it's much cheaper just to lose a few pounds of fat!

For a more complete answer you need to define what you want a bike for and what your budget will run to. There are many people on HUKD who have far better knowledge to advise you than I do but I'm afraid you'll have to pick them out from the majority of self-opinionated, infantile posters (see Kevo2k7 above).
#18
deadsquirrel
I am currently looking for a bike, but im actually looking for a BMX. Oh, im 36 years old and yes, i am going through my midlife crisis.


Don't. You'll use it 3 times and give up. BMX's are knackering for anything longer than a few hundred metres.

This bike looks good for the money. As the gent above says they are ideal for commuting. If its too practical for a mid life crisis get a cross country mountian bike. Its practical as well as cool (making a good commuter with the addition of slick tyres)
#19
teambintip
Not necessarily, personal preference plays an important role in picking size.

Some mountain-bike riders seem to think that they need to have their seat a foot higher than the bars.

The 28 inch wheels add an inch to the standover height of the frame btw

I'll not vote on this one, Muddy-Fox is a terrible brand, their bikes are made under license and the quality is relatively poor compared to "bigger" brands


I'm a mountain bike rider who likes his bars to be lower than the saddle. Not by a foot but by a good few inches. It's for practical reasons, you can shift your weight better when riding on technical stuff and it stretches your body and lungs out making it easier to breathe when you're going for it.

Urban bikes are often described as 'sit up and beg' position where by the bars are higher than the saddle and much nearer than on a mtb. This aids visibility but is no good for long periods in the saddle.

Muddy fox used to be a well respected brand back in the 80's. These days they are cheap and cheerful. That said most frames come out of 1 of about 10 factories in Taiwan and the 'maufacturer' just bolts bits on. It sounds as if those bits are proper shimano entry level ones on here so all good really for the price.
#20
Golaboots888
I'm a mountain bike rider who likes his bars to be lower than the saddle. Not by a foot but by a good few inches. It's for practical reasons, you can shift your weight better when riding on technical stuff and it stretches your body and lungs out making it easier to breathe when you're going for it.



Personally I don't agree. I hate riding like that
#21
Besford
Uh oh, here we go! Reasonable question but I fear you've just woken up every Lycra Lout who is now going to tell you anything under £3000 is rubbish.

There have been many long threads on this subject on here. In summary I think the balanced view would be that very cheap bikes are incredible value for what you get but probably won't be nice to ride and quality/durability is very suspect. Probably fine for an ocassional ride for the non-enthusiast and better than spending a lot if it's just going to fill your shed. If you get one you'll quickly want to give up cycling or buy something better, but it's a cheap way of trying the activity. If you do buy a cheap one get a basic bike (no suspension, etc) so that at least the bits you get may be a bit better quality.

Something like this deal is likely to be a good balance between cost, quality and performance for an 'ordinary' cyclist. In this case it's a decent bike for road use/commuting if you're not interested in impressing the neighbours (as if they would be anyway).

Start spending a lot more and you're into the law of diminishing returns - ie it will be better in some ways but each extra pound buys you less and less extra bike. Weight is one of the holy grails, hence people will pay mega money for carbon fibre, etc. Back in the real world it's much cheaper just to lose a few pounds of fat!

For a more complete answer you need to define what you want a bike for and what your budget will run to. There are many people on HUKD who have far better knowledge to advise you than I do but I'm afraid you'll have to pick them out from the majority of self-opinionated, infantile posters (see Kevo2k7 above).


You've got it bang on. £50 bikes with dual suspension and disc brakes appear to be very good value to the novice in the supermarket. Unfortunately they are made to look like good bikes rather than be good bikes.
At best they are heavy and unreliable. At worse the build quality is so bad they can be dangerous. Either way they will probably end up rusting away in the shed while the novice cyclist sits inside or uses the car.

Entry level bikes from proper bike manufacturers (which arguably this one is) are a much better proposition, being lighter, safer and more plesant in general. This means they're nicer to use and you're more likely to enjoy using it.

Once you get hooked on cycling you can spend £1000's for diminishing returns. A £500 bike is generally considered decent by people who are into it.
#22
Toybhoy
Yeah 21" frame should be for people around 6ft and over.

The poster above who said her 5ft 3 husband riding this - well he needs a much smaller bike. Maybe a 15" or 17" at a push.

Is that really true on a road bike? I'm 5'9" on a good day and the 21" frame of my old ATB feels very comfortable for me for road use - in fact I need the seatpost raised a fair bit too.

What about the caliper brakes? I thought everything had moved to V brakes if not discs. Are there advantages to caliper (I can't think of any). Event my old ATB has cantilevers.
#23
msharif911
Why is this so expensive? You can get other bikes for upwards of £50 with suspension and disc brakes etc (albeit cheap made in China ones).

This bike has none of those yet is £180. I am not a clued up bikey, I am just asking a question before anyone gets sensitive and thinks I am attacking anyone.


You get what you pay for with bikes.

Generally you don't want anything less than £300 for just front suspension and less than £800 for full suspension.

The full suspension £100 bikes are death traps.
#24
Besford
Looks like a good deal for a decent bike to use on road for someone mature enough to value performance over image. Didn't know they still do caliper brakes though - could be a weak point?


You obviously aren't familiar with road bikes.

Caliper brakes are standard on road bikes up to and including those costing thousands of pounds.

ClashInDevon
#25
I've just added this to my stable of bikes, that's 5 in the garage now (wife just looked at me angrily) at this price it is a good deal and much much better than the £80 supermarket rubbish. There is a review of the purely road version of this bike below at the full price of £400, the two are very similar so the review is a good indication that the Hybrid version is also a great bike and even better at the price.

http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/bikes/road/product/milano-road-09-34648

http://www.muddyfox.com/milano_hybrid_2008.html
#26
sotomonkey
It's a 21" frame so if you're below about 6 foot ish this bike will not fit you.



.


OF course it will
#27
Besford;7560400
Uh oh, here we go! Reasonable question but I fear you've just woken up every Lycra Lout who is now going to tell you anything under £3000 is rubbish.

There have been many long threads on this subject on here. In summary I think the balanced view would be that very cheap bikes are incredible value for what you get but probably won't be nice to ride and quality/durability is very suspect. Probably fine for an ocassional ride for the non-enthusiast and better than spending a lot if it's just going to fill your shed. If you get one you'll quickly want to give up cycling or buy something better, but it's a cheap way of trying the activity. If you do buy a cheap one get a basic bike (no suspension, etc) so that at least the bits you get may be a bit better quality.

Something like this deal (not necessarily this bike - I don't know it) is likely to be a good balance between cost, quality and performance for an 'ordinary' cyclist. In this case it's a decent bike for road use/commuting if you're not interested in impressing the neighbours (as if they would be anyway). Adding a rack and mudguards to a bike without them could easily add £40-£50 plus labour if you can't do it yourself so it's worth bearing these in mind too.

Start spending a lot more and you're into the law of diminishing returns - ie it will be better in some ways but each extra pound buys you less and less extra bike. Weight is one of the holy grails, hence people will pay mega money for carbon fibre, etc. Back in the real world it's much cheaper just to lose a few pounds of fat!

For a more complete answer you need to define what you want a bike for and what your budget will run to. There are many people on HUKD who have far better knowledge to advise you than I do but I'm afraid you'll have to pick them out from the majority of self-opinionated, infantile posters (see Kevo2k7 above).


Again I have to applaud this reply... very balanced... way better that I've been in the past!

One thing I would point out is that I still beg caution on the supermarket bikes. If you are honest with yourself and agree in advance that this bike it going to do a couple of hundred miles, tops, then perhaps. But then are they really a good deal?

My worry with them (and a small ammount of first hand experience) is that they are so bad... built with components of such low quality or obscure specifications that they will put new cyclists off the sport. For example getting repeated punctures due to cheap wheels, inner tubes or simply a lack of or ill fitted rim tape will really put beginners off (yes Halfords, hang your head in shame!). Another problem is getting very high bills from bike shops who stuggle to source replacement parts, have to replace more parts than necessary (because they cannot get the replacement part) or simply cannot get the part off (yes, Tesco hang your head in shame, no crank extraction threads = 2 hour job to remove crank arms).

However, this bike is not those things. It's got a good set of Shimano gears, cassette etc which you will be able to get replacement parts for years to come. It's a reasonable frame made with lightish aluminium and heck, even Bike Radar reviewed it (as mjr600 linkd to), which puts if firmly out of the category of supermarket bike.

BTW, I am one of those Lycra clad people, but I'm so tempted with this bike... just not sure the wife will be so happy.
#28
There seems to be some confusion for some on this thread - this isn't a mountain bike (despite the flat bars) . While 21" would be a L-XL frame for a mountain bike, it's certainly not for a bike that's to be used on road. So suspension, disc brakes etc are irrelevant too (and in fact gimmicks like that are on mountain bikes of the same price anyway, as mentioned above).

Look around and there's very little choice for this kind of bike at this kind of price - the specs seem very good. Personally I use a modified large framed mountain bike with 1.2" slick tyres, rigid forks and a big chainring, For me it's just as good, cost me £200 in all and weighs around 23-24lb but if something like this had been around when I was buying it I'd have been very interested in it.
#29
Well just put mine together after going to Argos Winsford Cheshire - the only Argos for miles around that had one left. Comes flat packed but construction is straightforward. I had more problems alining the wheel mug guards than anything else. The bike is very very light after my former mountain bike and the tyres very narrow, the gearing is clearly set for speed. Very pleased with my purchase,but frustrated that I can't inflate the tyres as my car pump does not fit, looks like a trip to Halfords tomorrow before the first ride
#30
jukie
OF course it will


Well you'll be able to ride it yes, but you'll be unable to put your feet down on the floor when sitting on the saddle, that is if the saddle is at the correct height.
#31
sotomonkey
Well you'll be able to ride it yes, but you'll be unable to put your feet down on the floor when sitting on the saddle, that is if the saddle is at the correct height.


As other people have already suggested, you clearly don't understand the geometry of road bikes.

I would say that a 21 inch framed road bike should be suitable for people between around 5 foot six inches and 6 foot. I am six foot three inches and ride a 24 inched framed road bike.

ClashInDevon
#32
Besford
Is that really true on a road bike? I'm 5'9" on a good day and the 21" frame of my old ATB feels very comfortable for me for road use - in fact I need the seatpost raised a fair bit too.

What about the caliper brakes? I thought everything had moved to V brakes if not discs. Are there advantages to caliper (I can't think of any). Event my old ATB has cantilevers.


Sorry, I misread this and only just realised its a roadbike hybrid, not a MTB hybrid.

21inch is either a 53/54cm frame which is fine for someone between 5ft 8 to 6ft. :thumbsup:
#33
ClashInDevon
As other people have already suggested, you clearly don't understand the geometry of road bikes.

I would say that a 21 inch framed road bike should be suitable for people between around 5 foot six inches and 6 foot. I am six foot three inches and ride a 24 inched framed road bike.

ClashInDevon


I'm 5'9" with short fat hairy legs. Having put my new bike together this evening I find that with the saddle low its fine, and the cross bar just tickles my fancy when standing with both feet on the ground. As much as I enjoy my little tickle, I naturally tend to tip the bike to one side like everyone else so what is all the fuss about?!
#34
My mistake, I didn't realise it was a road bike hybrid. In that case the following size guide applies.

Road Bike Sizing Guide

Determining Your Road Bike Frame Size
Height Inseam Length Bike Frame Size
4'10" - 5'1" 25.5” - 27” 46 - 48 cm
5'0" - 5'3" 26.5" - 28" 48 - 50 cm
5'2" - 5'5" 27.5" - 29" 50 - 52 cm
5'4" - 5'7" 28.5" - 30" 52 - 54 cm******** (argos bike)*******
5'6" - 5'9" 29.5" - 31" 54 - 56 cm
5'8" - 5'11" 30.5" - 32" 56 - 58 cm
5'10" - 6'1" 31.5" - 33" 58 - 60 cm
6'0" - 6'3" 32.5" - 34" 60 - 62 cm
6'2" - 6'5" 34.5" - 36" 62 - 64 cm
#35
i would buy this if only it was my size..the frame is just one inch too small. im 6'1" with long legs so my ideal frame size is 56 or 58 cm (22 or 23" inch).
this bike is available at 56cm frame size but the argos page doesnt allow frame size selection..its 53cm (21")
great find OP.
#36
sotomonkey
How low have you put the saddle. Having it too low can make it harder to ride. The point is you really shouldn't have to put the saddle low in order to ride this bike. That's why it's better to get an 18" framed bike if you're only 5foot 9.


No sorry you miss the point, this is a hybrid bike, a bike with road credentials, bar the MB handle bars for a bit of cred; for goodness sake it has thin tyres, mud guards and rack, how many mountain bikes have you seen recently with carrier racks? I don't want my ass stuck up in the air above my head, my back cant take it any more, otherwise I would have gone for a full road bike dropped handle machine. For a tourer/ commuter bike where heads up for comfort and to watch the traffic is a lot more important, this is the perfect bike even for the sub 6' ers like me.
#37
@sotomonkey an inch less than those frame sizes and is ok for me.
#38
Now we've sorted the size issue there's no stock in my six nearest stores (south Birmingham) and home delivery site is not available at the moment. Oh well, a night to think it through.

Can anyone confirm whether the gears on this bike are decent - always the first bit to give trouble in my experience.
1 Like #39
If I was going for a bike around this price, I wouldnt buy from Argos to be honest. This will come in a box which you will need to buy yourself and Muddy Fox are not known for building quality bikes anymore.

I would add an extra £20 and get this one here

http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/ebwPNLqrymode.a4p?f_ProductID=10821&f_FullProductVersion=1&f_SupersetQRY=C398&f_SortOrderID=1&f_bct=c008921c008923c009316

Would be ideal for commuting and general riding. Spec wise it is better than the Argos but the main thing is you're buying a trusted and reputable brand and from a proper bike shop so you will get it built and tested for you for free
#40
Besford
Now we've sorted the size issue there's no stock in my six nearest stores (south Birmingham) and home delivery site is not available at the moment. Oh well, a night to think it through.

Can anyone confirm whether the gears on this bike are decent - always the first bit to give trouble in my experience.


Any gearset will cause problems if not properly maintained. This is specced with Sora (i think) decent, reasonably cheap and readily available

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