Netgear XAVB5201 500 Powerline Adapter Kit £14.97 @ PC World - HotUKDeals
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Netgear XAVB5201 500 Powerline Adapter Kit £14.97 @ PC World

£14.97 @ PC World
Really good price for a fantastic piece of kit. Extend Internet access throughout your home to any electrical outlet for desktop PCs, gaming consoles and set-top boxes Pick-a-Plug LED - automati… Read More
Fleabum Avatar
2y, 5m agoFound 2 years, 5 months ago
Really good price for a fantastic piece of kit.

Extend Internet access throughout your home to any electrical outlet for desktop PCs, gaming consoles and set-top boxes

Pick-a-Plug LED - automatically tests the connection at any electrical outlet to ensure the highest possible performance

Expand your existing Powerline network - backwards compatible with Homeplug AV (including Netgear Powerline AV) products

The Netgear XAVB5201-100UKS 500 Mbps Powerline Adapter Kit is the perfect solution for extending your home network. With plug-and-play set up, installation is easy as pie, it is great for 3D or high definition multimedia streaming.

The Netgear XAVB5201-100UKS is ideal for connecting to your Smart TVs, HD set top boxes, Blu-ray players, PCs and game consoles to your home network to unlock a range of online features. Using a wired connection will also provide a more stable connection than a wireless connection so streaming will be lag and jitter free.

Additionally the Netgear XAVB5201-100UKS will automatically test the connection at any electrical outlet to ensure the highest possible performance.

Regards
Flea

**edit** - Amazon have now also matched this price if you prefer ordering online. - Flea
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Netgear-XAVB5201-500-Powerline-Adapter/dp/B009S5O6PI
**edit 2** - Amazon sold out now. Back to full price.
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Fleabum Avatar
2y, 5m agoFound 2 years, 5 months ago
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1 Like #1
Same price as Amazon which for Currys, isn't too bad I suppose.
#2
Can these be mixed with TP LINK adaptors?
1 Like #3
kristoff
Can these be mixed with TP LINK adaptors?

The Netgear are 'Homeplug AV compliant' so if your TP LINK ones are, then they should be. Check the tech specs on your TP LINK ones.

Regards
Flea
1 Like #4
No gigabit ethernet.
1 Like #5
Great price; have some heat! I paid just over £40 for my 200's around 16 months ago so will let a few friends know.
#6
anewman
No gigabit ethernet.

And your point? most wireless struggles to get 150m/bit in the average home...

Regards
Flea
#7
Great price, have used home plugs for years would recommend.
#8
So for someone who is new to this would you say these over the tp link?
#9
Nice find
2 Likes #10
Comment
Fleabum
anewman
No gigabit ethernet.


And your point? most wireless struggles to get 150m/bit in the average home...

Regards
Flea


I think the problem is that they're advertised at 500mbps. The Ethernet port on these are only rated at 100mbps, which is a massive bottleneck. I'm aware that the 500mbps is an advertised figure tested in ideal conditions etc etc but it can still be a big issue.

I had some TP-LINK 200mbps which actually averaged 170-190mbps across the ground floor of my house, though only having a 100mbps Ethernet port meant that I couldn't take full advantage of that connection.

So while you're correct in saying most wifi is limited to 150mbps, there may be some people who require something a little faster and will see the 500mbps rating and purchase it - not realising until it's all setup that they're actually worse off.

For example, people with a 152mbps Virgin Media connection won't get the best out of their broadband if they're networked with these. I currently use some devolo 600mbps rated adapters which connect in my house at around 490mbps - the gigabit Ethernet port lets me use all of that 490mbps :)

Sorry if it sounds like I'm getting you, that's not my intention at all. It's just that I found out the hard way so hopefully this post someone deciding which model to buy.
#11
good deal, and you only benefit from gigabit if you are connecting multiple devices, maybe if you connect a switch etc.... home wiring has a limit on how much data you can put across it anyway, like I said good deal.....
#12
For the price these are really good!

500Mbps translates to roughly 62.5MB throughput - which is fantastic for all regular broadband users, but not necessarily for all Fibre broadband users.
#13
I would like to ask a question re-powerline adapters ( PA ), hopefully someone will know the answer!
I have a pair of Netgear PA's which work very well most of the time. I get a dropped line once maybe twice a day, only in the daylight hours, it never seems to occur during the night, ( I am an OAP and sometimes cannot sleep so use the comp during the night ).
Netgear replaced an original pair after trying to find a solution but the prob remains.
I have tried using several computers with the PA's but to no avail. The comps had either Vista or Win7, all with 4 gb ram and dual cores.
NB. It is only the PA's that drop the Router stays up, in fact it hardly ever drops.
The Electrical wiring is 17 years old as is the house.
The throughput is exactly the same as the Router. Also, I have used Wireless in the past, never got a drop.
cheers,
Eddie.
#14
These shouldn't be marketed as 500Mb when the maximum is 100Mb as limited by the ethernet connection. If you have gigabit anywhere or wireless N/AC these will be a bit of a bottleneck.
#15
Anybody know if these are small enough to fit next to another plug in double socket? I recently bought Linksys wireless and what a regret. too large and doesnt work through extensions!
#16
Great deal, use one for my IP camera, works great.
#17
ssaass
I would like to ask a question re-powerline adapters ( PA ), hopefully someone will know the answer!
I have a pair of Netgear PA's which work very well most of the time. I get a dropped line once maybe twice a day, only in the daylight hours, it never seems to occur during the night, ( I am an OAP and sometimes cannot sleep so use the comp during the night ).
Netgear replaced an original pair after trying to find a solution but the prob remains.
I have tried using several computers with the PA's but to no avail. The comps had either Vista or Win7, all with 4 gb ram and dual cores.
NB. It is only the PA's that drop the Router stays up, in fact it hardly ever drops.
The Electrical wiring is 17 years old as is the house.
The throughput is exactly the same as the Router. Also, I have used Wireless in the past, never got a drop.
cheers,
Eddie.

Do they not reconnect automatically? From some comments I've seen, dropping the connection just twice a day seems pretty good going...
#18
nice find ,excellent price
#19
If they reconnected automatically I wouldn't be asking the question!
#20
ssaass
I would like to ask a question re-powerline adapters ( PA ), hopefully someone will know the answer!
I have a pair of Netgear PA's which work very well most of the time. I get a dropped line once maybe twice a day, only in the daylight hours, it never seems to occur during the night, ( I am an OAP and sometimes cannot sleep so use the comp during the night ).
Netgear replaced an original pair after trying to find a solution but the prob remains.
I have tried using several computers with the PA's but to no avail. The comps had either Vista or Win7, all with 4 gb ram and dual cores.
NB. It is only the PA's that drop the Router stays up, in fact it hardly ever drops.
The Electrical wiring is 17 years old as is the house.
The throughput is exactly the same as the Router. Also, I have used Wireless in the past, never got a drop.
cheers,
Eddie.

I've got TP-Link homeplugs they drop the connection, had 200mb, now have 500Mb. I've had 85mb Devolo Homeplugs though and they never dropped the connection. Homeplugs do seem to have issues dropping the connection. Possibly the Devolo were more stable as they were slower, who knows.
#21
ssaass
If they reconnected automatically I wouldn't be asking the question!
Actually you didn't ask a question at all in your post. Maybe someone else will try and help you.
#22
ssaass
If they reconnected automatically I wouldn't be asking the question!


why the attitude?

Surely the question is still valid even if it did reconnect?

My TPlink 200 & 500 used to drop connection and reconnect maybe once a day. But the Netgear 200 mini (not nano) ones never disconnect.
#23
Physically impossible to get 170-190mbps across your ground floor if the port maxes out at 100mbps.

The 200 rated homeplugs max out around 55-65MB/s based on perfect conditions. The 500mbps plugs will max out at approx. 150-165MB/s dependent on perfect conditions and gigabit ports.

Also bear in mind, if your router port is 10/100 then having gigabit port on your homeplugs is a waste of time as speed is lowered to the common denominator i.e 100mbps.

You should test your speed using a file transfer test rather then using supplied homeplug utilities to give a real indication of real world speed.
southlegend
Comment
Fleabum
anewman
No gigabit ethernet.
And your point? most wireless struggles to get 150m/bit in the average home...
Regards
Flea
I think the problem is that they're advertised at 500mbps. The Ethernet port on these are only rated at 100mbps, which is a massive bottleneck. I'm aware that the 500mbps is an advertised figure tested in ideal conditions etc etc but it can still be a big issue.
I had some TP-LINK 200mbps which actually averaged 170-190mbps across the ground floor of my house, though only having a 100mbps Ethernet port meant that I couldn't take full advantage of that connection.
So while you're correct in saying most wifi is limited to 150mbps, there may be some people who require something a little faster and will see the 500mbps rating and purchase it - not realising until it's all setup that they're actually worse off.
For example, people with a 152mbps Virgin Media connection won't get the best out of their broadband if they're networked with these. I currently use some devolo 600mbps rated adapters which connect in my house at around 490mbps - the gigabit Ethernet port lets me use all of that 490mbps :)
Sorry if it sounds like I'm getting you, that's not my intention at all. It's just that I found out the hard way so hopefully this post someone deciding which model to buy.


Edited By: imran999 on Jan 10, 2015 13:14: .
#24
southlegend
Comment
Fleabum
anewman
No gigabit ethernet.


And your point? most wireless struggles to get 150m/bit in the average home...

Regards
Flea


I think the problem is that they're advertised at 500mbps. The Ethernet port on these are only rated at 100mbps, which is a massive bottleneck. I'm aware that the 500mbps is an advertised figure tested in ideal conditions etc etc but it can still be a big issue.

I had some TP-LINK 200mbps which actually averaged 170-190mbps across the ground floor of my house, though only having a 100mbps Ethernet port meant that I couldn't take full advantage of that connection.

So while you're correct in saying most wifi is limited to 150mbps, there may be some people who require something a little faster and will see the 500mbps rating and purchase it - not realising until it's all setup that they're actually worse off.

For example, people with a 152mbps Virgin Media connection won't get the best out of their broadband if they're networked with these. I currently use some devolo 600mbps rated adapters which connect in my house at around 490mbps - the gigabit Ethernet port lets me use all of that 490mbps :)

Sorry if it sounds like I'm getting you, that's not my intention at all. It's just that I found out the hard way so hopefully this post someone deciding which model to buy.


exactly. I purchased these few years ago thinking they would do up to 500mbps and be gigabit Ethernet. boy was I wrong. totally misleading bs! cold from me. even though its functional no doffrrmce between this and 200mps one as bottleneck is at 100mbps. put into perspective you won't be streaming hd content from multiple sources through this thing as its far from smooth.
#25
Fleabum
anewman
No gigabit ethernet.

And your point? most wireless struggles to get 150m/bit in the average home...

Regards
Flea
Yes, but my wireless router has a gigabit switch.
#26
I reserved these at PC World in Oxford Street. These are useless to me as I didn't realise the ethernet was only 100mb. If anyone wants the reservation number it's there till end of Sunday PM me. They probably have enough stock but if they don't hit me up
#27
ssaass
I would like to ask a question re-powerline adapters ( PA ), hopefully someone will know the answer!
I have a pair of Netgear PA's which work very well most of the time. I get a dropped line once maybe twice a day, only in the daylight hours, it never seems to occur during the night, ( I am an OAP and sometimes cannot sleep so use the comp during the night ).
Netgear replaced an original pair after trying to find a solution but the prob remains.
I have tried using several computers with the PA's but to no avail. The comps had either Vista or Win7, all with 4 gb ram and dual cores.
NB. It is only the PA's that drop the Router stays up, in fact it hardly ever drops.
The Electrical wiring is 17 years old as is the house.
The throughput is exactly the same as the Router. Also, I have used Wireless in the past, never got a drop.
cheers,
Eddie.

There could be a few different issues causing this. As you have had the units replaced its less likely to be the devices so look into the environment (unless a design flaw in the devices you use, have you checked for updated firmware?). My investigations would start with be the computers themselves, if a PC attached to a powerline plug goes into sleep/hibernate mode, this can cause the powerline adapter to also go to sleep,which makes it appear the connection has been dropped, I've seen this happen with TP-Link devices before.

Other things to consider is location of powerline adapters... are they in a extension, and/or 4 gang... are they on two different rings in the house, do you have other devices in the property that use the power 'network' like smart metering devices or does it happen at Economy 7 switch over times. To help test some of these, put the powerline devices in sockets right next to each other, then attach PC/router and leave on test... does the connection still drop?

Just a few ideas to try. Hope they help.

Regards
Flea
#28
Good price, paid double this for the BT ones recently (which are really good). Netgear should perform well their consumer kit is good most of the time with only a few let down products over the years.

The 500mbps is only an advantage is you have multiple devices on the network at the same time, if you just have one device, as pointed out the ethernet port is the bottleneck, but several devices in different rooms and you benefit from the additional bandwidth and reduced contention.

Edited By: mattclarkie on Jan 10, 2015 14:01
2 Likes #29
imran999
Physically impossible to get 170-190mbps across your ground floor if the port maxes out at 100mbps.
The 200 rated homeplugs max out around 55-65MB/s based on perfect conditions. The 500mbps plugs will max out at approx. 150-165MB/s dependent on perfect conditions and gigabit ports.
Also bear in mind, if your router port is 10/100 then having gigabit port on your homeplugs is a waste of time as speed is lowered to the common denominator i.e 100mbps.
You should test your speed using a file transfer test rather then using supplied homeplug utilities to give a real indication of real world speed.
southlegend
Comment
Fleabum
anewman
No gigabit ethernet.
And your point? most wireless struggles to get 150m/bit in the average home...
Regards
Flea
I think the problem is that they're advertised at 500mbps. The Ethernet port on these are only rated at 100mbps, which is a massive bottleneck. I'm aware that the 500mbps is an advertised figure tested in ideal conditions etc etc but it can still be a big issue.
I had some TP-LINK 200mbps which actually averaged 170-190mbps across the ground floor of my house, though only having a 100mbps Ethernet port meant that I couldn't take full advantage of that connection.
So while you're correct in saying most wifi is limited to 150mbps, there may be some people who require something a little faster and will see the 500mbps rating and purchase it - not realising until it's all setup that they're actually worse off.
For example, people with a 152mbps Virgin Media connection won't get the best out of their broadband if they're networked with these. I currently use some devolo 600mbps rated adapters which connect in my house at around 490mbps - the gigabit Ethernet port lets me use all of that 490mbps :)
Sorry if it sounds like I'm getting you, that's not my intention at all. It's just that I found out the hard way so hopefully this post someone deciding which model to buy.


I don't think you read my post properly fella. It's quite easy for them to reach 170-190mbps considering the ones I purchased were rated for 200mbps. In fact, that indicates that the wiring in my house is ideal for powerline adapters. I'm quite aware that the lowest speed I would have got via the actual Ethernet port is 100mbps, which is why I said I then went and bought a 600mbps rated pair with gigabit ethernet ports.

Also, 200mbps powerline adapters (in an ideal situation, which is very rare) would max at approx 25MB/s. Even in that case, the adapter would need to have a gigabit Ethernet port to give connected devices the pull 25MB/s - otherwise a 100mbps port would restrict that down to 12.5MB/s at best.

Same math applies to the 500 rated ones, which would give you 60-65MB/s at best with gigabit ports (again, going down to 12.5MB/s with 100mbps ports).

Any transfer speed calculator will give you the same answers.

I've run multiple tests with multiple adapters between my home server and networked HTPC's (where network bandwidth is crucial for streaming Blu-Ray discs). Trust me, I've spent more hours on this than I want to admit haha.

Again, sorry if you (or anyone else) think I sound rude... I just don't want people to waste time & money on a product that won't fulfil their needs - I've wasted that time and money already so I just hope that I can help people make informed decisions.
#30
Transfer Rates needed for various video streaming

1.0 - 2.3 Mb/s for SD — SD video
2.3 Mb/s - 4.5 Mbs for 720p video
4.5 Mb/s - 9 Mb/s for 1080p video
Over 9 Mb/s for 3-D HD 1080p movies
15-25MB/s for 4k video

So 200mbps homeplugs are fine for 1080p video streaming dependent on your environment.
1 Like #31
southlegend
Again, sorry if you (or anyone else) think I sound rude... I just don't want people to waste time & money on a product that won't fulfil their needs - I've wasted that time and money already so I just hope that I can help people make informed decisions.

I totally agree with you these are not right for everyone, but my guess is the majority of people looking for cheap powerline adapters are looking to extend their wireless network to far reaches of the house where wireless can be problematic. Also these powerline adapters offer far superior pings to both wireless and wireless extenders (great for the gamers on xbone and ps4).

I do agree with you that these will not be fantastic for streaming blu-ray across multiple clients (55 mbit per station uncompressed is the average I see) but they could manage a single client. You have to concede that most people setting up advanced heavy home sharing across multiple clients will already be aware of the limitations of bandwidth and not be looking at single 100m/bit ports anyway.

It is a good brand for a good price, but not right for everyone (like most hot deals on here I guess!).

Regards
Flea
#32
Back to the point....yeah these are a great price and best to buy these 500 rated over the 200 rates ones if you don't already use homeplugs.
#33
Comment
imran999
Transfer Rates needed for various video streaming

1.0 - 2.3 Mb/s for SD — SD video
2.3 Mb/s - 4.5 Mbs for 720p video
4.5 Mb/s - 9 Mb/s for 1080p video
Over 9 Mb/s for 3-D HD 1080p movies
15-25MB/s for 4k video

So 200mbps homeplugs are fine for 1080p video streaming dependent on your environment.


Just about. The 100mbps would work for a lot of the downloaded rips I tried but then there would be the slightly higher quality ones that wouldn't work. However for those of us streaming source quality Blu-Rays that we've purchased, 100mbps just stutters and stops all over the place.

So I guess basically I should just say that these are suitable for basic networking, instead of starting debates on the Internet LOL. Sorry if I've come across hostile mate!
#34
friendly banter mate. Its all good. Personally I say go for the best which is wired Ethernet but failing that go for the 500mbps at this great price point...or the 600's if they on a good deal.
#35
Another plus point of these is that they are compatible with Netgear Genie app, which lets you set them up with encryption and other useful goodies.



Other common sites still selling these at pre deal prices :-

eBuyer - £33.65
Scan - £24.95
Novatech - £24.98

Regards
Flea
#36
Selling like HOT cakes, none in store within 30 miles. Good luck people
#37
The same company also do a Parallel port SSD and Thunderbolt card for the ZX Spectrum. :P

Having said that, although I wouldn't use these for gaming (some low end powerline kit has pretty high latency, particularly in older houses) or streaming full quality Blu-Ray rips, these are perfectly adequate for getting around WIFI blackspots or setting up plenty of networked devices which don't play nice with wireless e.g. printers, many TVs and set top boxes.

imran999
Transfer Rates needed for various video streaming

1.0 - 2.3 Mb/s for SD — SD video
2.3 Mb/s - 4.5 Mbs for 720p video
4.5 Mb/s - 9 Mb/s for 1080p video
Over 9 Mb/s for 3-D HD 1080p movies
15-25MB/s for 4k video

Maybe for Youtube or even Netflix, but full quality BluRay can be up to 48 mbps.

Edited By: HyperlogiK on Jan 10, 2015 15:07
#38
Are these better than wireless adapters for use on a PC?
#39
Fleabum
ssaass
I would like to ask a question re-powerline adapters ( PA ), hopefully someone will know the answer!
I have a pair of Netgear PA's which work very well most of the time. I get a dropped line once maybe twice a day, only in the daylight hours, it never seems to occur during the night, ( I am an OAP and sometimes cannot sleep so use the comp during the night ).
Netgear replaced an original pair after trying to find a solution but the prob remains.
I have tried using several computers with the PA's but to no avail. The comps had either Vista or Win7, all with 4 gb ram and dual cores.
NB. It is only the PA's that drop the Router stays up, in fact it hardly ever drops.
The Electrical wiring is 17 years old as is the house.
The throughput is exactly the same as the Router. Also, I have used Wireless in the past, never got a drop.
cheers,
Eddie.

There could be a few different issues causing this. As you have had the units replaced its less likely to be the devices so look into the environment (unless a design flaw in the devices you use, have you checked for updated firmware?). My investigations would start with be the computers themselves, if a PC attached to a powerline plug goes into sleep/hibernate mode, this can cause the powerline adapter to also go to sleep,which makes it appear the connection has been dropped, I've seen this happen with TP-Link devices before.

Other things to consider is location of powerline adapters... are they in a extension, and/or 4 gang... are they on two different rings in the house, do you have other devices in the property that use the power 'network' like smart metering devices or does it happen at Economy 7 switch over times. To help test some of these, put the powerline devices in sockets right next to each other, then attach PC/router and leave on test... does the connection still drop?

Just a few ideas to try. Hope they help.

Regards
Flea

Flea, thank you for the reply. The only thing that I have re your answer is the Electric has the type of meter that we top up with a card. Other than that the units plug into the wall. As I said in my OP that Netgear Techies tried everything they know which included all your suggestions plus others, the only thing they didn't ask is the Smart meter.
again thankyou,
Eddie.
#40
Shock
ssaass
If they reconnected automatically I wouldn't be asking the question!

why the attitude?

Surely the question is still valid even if it did reconnect?

My TPlink 200 & 500 used to drop connection and reconnect maybe once a day. But the Netgear 200 mini (not nano) ones never disconnect.

I reiterate, if they didn't disconnect there wouldn't be a need to ask the question. Attitude? There wasn't any attitude offered or intended, you seem to be of a sensitive nature.

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