Nissan Leaf 30kWh Tekna down £199pm 2 years £500 deposit @ Nissan - HotUKDeals
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Nissan Leaf 30kWh Tekna down £199pm 2 years £500 deposit @ Nissan £5,276.00

£5276.00 @ Nissan
Best electric deal around at the moment PCP 6000 miles a year. Free home charger Non metallic (i.e. Red) No 6.6kW charging Official deposit is £499 but dealers will price match Bromsgrove (Ar… Read More
tuohy16 Avatar
2m, 4d agoFound 2 months, 4 days ago
Best electric deal around at the moment
PCP
6000 miles a year. Free home charger

Non metallic (i.e. Red)
No 6.6kW charging
Official deposit is £499 but dealers will price match Bromsgrove (Arbury) Nissan at £199. Expires 28/2. I bought one from Leicester Nissan who I found to be very helpful.

Congestion charge exempt. Free charging at Nissan dealers. £6 rapid charging on motorways. Range 100-150 miles

There is a new model on the way with at least a 40kWh battery but the savings are enormous at the moment.
Car has leather, nav, Bose speakers, 360 degree cameras etc
Deal Tags:
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tuohy16 Avatar
2m, 4d agoFound 2 months, 4 days ago
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Top Comments

(2)
24 Likes
What's the difference between a golf ball and a Nissan Leaf?

A golf ball can be driven 300 yards. 


Edited By: gazdoubleu on Feb 18, 2017 18:53: Error
5 Likes
monkeyhanger75
Electric cars are not for the near future until the UK gets its electricity generation up to scratch, we have just enough electricity to cover demand, if just 5% of the cars on UK roads were replaced with electric vehicles that need charging, then the UK's electricity supply would be screwed.


Do you have a source to this?

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4 Likes #1
£6 quid at services for a hundred miles doesn't sound much good considering the draw is supposed to be cheap miles!
Nor does sitting at your local Nissan for an eternity waiting for some charge whilst supposedly feeling great that it's free.
24 Likes #2
What's the difference between a golf ball and a Nissan Leaf?

A golf ball can be driven 300 yards. 


Edited By: gazdoubleu on Feb 18, 2017 18:53: Error
1 Like #3
As an aside, these vehicles also exclude people who cannot guarantee to get it close to their house for charging (i.e. shared parking).
3 Likes #4
fireman1
£6 quid at services for a hundred miles doesn't sound much good considering the draw is supposed to be cheap miles!
Nor does sitting at your local Nissan for an eternity waiting for some charge whilst supposedly feeling great that it's free.

I would gladly pay £6 for 100 miles, who wouldn't?!
2 Likes #5
teerex
fireman1
£6 quid at services for a hundred miles doesn't sound much good considering the draw is supposed to be cheap miles!
Nor does sitting at your local Nissan for an eternity waiting for some charge whilst supposedly feeling great that it's free.

I would gladly pay £6 for 100 miles, who wouldn't?!


Exactly, this is a positive. The worst you'll have to pay is £6 on the occasion you travel a long way.
4 Likes #6
London Mayor Sadiq Khan wants £21.50 to drive through London if you have a "dirty diesel". This is congestion charge free (£10 registration per year). VED is free. These are perfect city cars or as a second car.
The "eternity" at a fast charge point on the motorway or at the dealers is 20-30 mins for an 80% charge just time for a coffee or nippingvto the asda that's next to the dealers locally. If you buy domestic electricity from ecotricity motorway top ups are free (and you get the £6 refunded at IKEA at their points). The economics of owning an electric car are changing.


Edited By: tuohy16 on Feb 18, 2017 19:48: Explanation
4 Likes #7
fireman1
£6 quid at services for a hundred miles doesn't sound much good considering the draw is supposed to be cheap miles!
Nor does sitting at your local Nissan for an eternity waiting for some charge whilst supposedly feeling great that it's free.


Most people just plug in when they get home from work for a full 'tank' in the morning. At £3 to charge from home that's 100 miles for £3. compare that to around £11 if you have a car that can do around 50 mpg and the savings soon add up. What's nice about an electric car is getting into it on a freezing morning and the car is de-iced and warm as you can preheat it before you set off. Its fun too just point and stamp on the accelerator for instant go. I have a Leaf and don't wish to swap back to an ice car, yes I would like more range but my commute is small and 99.9% of the time range is not an issue. If I need more range I can fast charge or pinch the wife's civic. When I change it will either be for a longer range EV or the i3 as that quick and it is tempting.
#8
fireman1
£6 quid at services for a hundred miles doesn't sound much good considering the draw is supposed to be cheap miles!
Nor does sitting at your local Nissan for an eternity waiting for some charge whilst supposedly feeling great that it's free.


For those that have a driveway you can have a charging point installed at your home, which costs you a lot less than £6 for a full charge. My wife currently has a Renault Zoe which is due to go back in 3 months, and it has been superb for her 6 mile commute, and local journeys. Hopefully we will be able to get another deal on the Zoe, as she doesn't want to go back to petrol or diesel. :{
#9
Tried one of these on the Nissan 4 day trial. Was really impressed, no problem obtaining a charge. Did about 600 miles. If u use a car for local trips, short commutes, it is brilliant. But I won't be buying until the real range is up to the 200 mile mark. Would jump at one then, at the right price.
https://testdrive.nissan.co.uk/booking/leaf


Edited By: MickyD on Feb 18, 2017 21:50
#10
fedex1401
fireman1
£6 quid at services for a hundred miles doesn't sound much good considering the draw is supposed to be cheap miles!
Nor does sitting at your local Nissan for an eternity waiting for some charge whilst supposedly feeling great that it's free.


For those that have a driveway you can have a charging point installed at your home, which costs you a lot less than £6 for a full charge. My wife currently has a Renault Zoe which is due to go back in 3 months, and it has been superb for her 6 mile commute, and local journeys. Hopefully we will be able to get another deal on the Zoe, as she doesn't want to go back to petrol or diesel. :{


a charging point vs a standard plug I assume is there really much benefit at home as I assume it's just a differnce in charging time.
#11
tuohy16
London Mayor Sadiq Khan wants £21.50 to drive through London if you have a "dirty diesel". This is congestion charge free (£10 registration per year). VED is free. These are perfect city cars or as a second car.
The "eternity" at a fast charge point on the motorway or at the dealers is 20-30 mins for an 80% charge just time for a coffee or nippingvto the asda that's next to the dealers locally. If you buy domestic electricity from ecotricity motorway top ups are free (and you get the £6 refunded at IKEA at their points). The economics of owning an electric car are changing.



u must live in a very lucky place if the dealers so close to u and a asda next to it. I would get one aswell if it was so close to me as I done have off road parking so seems pointless getting one is there any other alternatives for people living in terrace houses who want use ev cars.
3 Likes #12
Electric cars are not for the near future until the UK gets its electricity generation up to scratch, we have just enough electricity to cover demand, if just 5% of the cars on UK roads were replaced with electric vehicles that need charging, then the UK's electricity supply would be screwed.
5 Likes #13
monkeyhanger75
Electric cars are not for the near future until the UK gets its electricity generation up to scratch, we have just enough electricity to cover demand, if just 5% of the cars on UK roads were replaced with electric vehicles that need charging, then the UK's electricity supply would be screwed.


Do you have a source to this?
1 Like #14
MynameisM
fedex1401
fireman1
£6 quid at services for a hundred miles doesn't sound much good considering the draw is supposed to be cheap miles!
Nor does sitting at your local Nissan for an eternity waiting for some charge whilst supposedly feeling great that it's free.
For those that have a driveway you can have a charging point installed at your home, which costs you a lot less than £6 for a full charge. My wife currently has a Renault Zoe which is due to go back in 3 months, and it has been superb for her 6 mile commute, and local journeys. Hopefully we will be able to get another deal on the Zoe, as she doesn't want to go back to petrol or diesel. :{
a charging point vs a standard plug I assume is there really much benefit at home as I assume it's just a differnce in charging time.

From 10% to 90% (which is generally the max you will charge) will take about 8 hours on a home basic podpoint charger. On a home 3 pin plug about 12 hours.
But in general most people charge to 80% drive to work an back and when they get home connect the charger and top it back upto 80%. The least degradation happens if you keep the battery between 20% and 80%.
3 Likes #15
jackvdbuk
monkeyhanger75
Electric cars are not for the near future until the UK gets its electricity generation up to scratch, we have just enough electricity to cover demand, if just 5% of the cars on UK roads were replaced with electric vehicles that need charging, then the UK's electricity supply would be screwed.

Do you have a source to this?

This is if people charge at peak times. Most electric car owners charge at night when we have excess capacity.

As we move to electric prices will rise. This will encourage people to use more economy 7 and 10 style tarrifs.

In the long term two things will happen. One you will use your car to load balance your electric use. Fill the car at night when there is lots of electric and use car to grid and use some electric from the car at home.

On the bigger scale old battery packs will store excess power at night to be delivered to the grid at peak times.

All the above already happen in places around the world.
#16
GAVINLEWISHUKD
This is if people charge at peak times. Most electric car owners charge at night when we have excess capacity.
As we move to electric prices will rise. This will encourage people to use more economy 7 and 10 style tarrifs.
In the long term two things will happen. One you will use your car to load balance your electric use. Fill the car at night when there is lots of electric and use car to grid and use some electric from the car at home.
On the bigger scale old battery packs will store excess power at night to be delivered to the grid at peak times.
All the above already happen in places around the world.
What happens if you can't park near your house?
#17
nomisco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
This is if people charge at peak times. Most electric car owners charge at night when we have excess capacity.
As we move to electric prices will rise. This will encourage people to use more economy 7 and 10 style tarrifs.
In the long term two things will happen. One you will use your car to load balance your electric use. Fill the car at night when there is lots of electric and use car to grid and use some electric from the car at home.
On the bigger scale old battery packs will store excess power at night to be delivered to the grid at peak times.
All the above already happen in places around the world.
What happens if you can't park near your house?

Honestly if you can't charge at home/work owning one will end up being a pain in the backside. So at the moment it's probably not for you.

But in the future when cars can do 250+ miles on a charge and Tesla, CCS and Chademo all have the 350kw chargers spending 10 mins to get 200+ miles of range won't be so bad.
4 Likes #18
jackvdbuk
monkeyhanger75
Electric cars are not for the near future until the UK gets its electricity generation up to scratch, we have just enough electricity to cover demand, if just 5% of the cars on UK roads were replaced with electric vehicles that need charging, then the UK's electricity supply would be screwed.


Do you have a source to this?


His only source is that one of the 3 monkeys said it on The Grand Tour a few weeks ago.
1 Like #19
he probably has seen a few articles about the blackouts and the spare capacity such as thus one and similar and in a way is probably correct

https://www.google.co.uk/amp/www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2016/07/08/uk-relies-on-emergency-measures-to-avert-winter-blackouts/amp/?client=ms-android-samsung

as I don't really think that 5 percent of EV would all top up at night and not use the cars in the winter when the there is a higher demand anyway. doing roughly 12000 miles a year assume 30 kwh give 100 miles is alot of extra electricity at around 3600 kwh for each car per annum. if it's 5 percent that's like another 1.6million cars or say 2 million extra houses to power up. and each year the cars are increasing steadily so seems like it would be a issue.

Edited By: MynameisM on Feb 19, 2017 12:18: typo
3 Likes #20
GAVINLEWISHUKD
nomisco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
This is if people charge at peak times. Most electric car owners charge at night when we have excess capacity.
As we move to electric prices will rise. This will encourage people to use more economy 7 and 10 style tarrifs.
In the long term two things will happen. One you will use your car to load balance your electric use. Fill the car at night when there is lots of electric and use car to grid and use some electric from the car at home.
On the bigger scale old battery packs will store excess power at night to be delivered to the grid at peak times.
All the above already happen in places around the world.
What happens if you can't park near your house?

Honestly if you can't charge at home/work owning one will end up being a pain in the backside. So at the moment it's probably not for you.

But in the future when cars can do 250+ miles on a charge and Tesla, CCS and Chademo all have the 350kw chargers spending 10 mins to get 200+ miles of range won't be so bad.


At the moment it's not for people who can't park right outside their houses.
Do they have plans to knock all these houses down and supply everyone with new houses then.
Millions of houses have no direct parking outside. Even terraced housing with only pavement between front door and car isn't viable and this will only get worse as space becomes more limited.
It makes me laugh that the marketing of electric cars is pushed as being cheap to charge, cheap to run, cheap ved but the reality is that they are still cars for the wealthy.
It's like having a food bank for homeless people based on an island that you need your own helicopter to get to.
#21
fireman1
GAVINLEWISHUKD
nomisco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
This is if people charge at peak times. Most electric car owners charge at night when we have excess capacity.
As we move to electric prices will rise. This will encourage people to use more economy 7 and 10 style tarrifs.
In the long term two things will happen. One you will use your car to load balance your electric use. Fill the car at night when there is lots of electric and use car to grid and use some electric from the car at home.
On the bigger scale old battery packs will store excess power at night to be delivered to the grid at peak times.
All the above already happen in places around the world.
What happens if you can't park near your house?

Honestly if you can't charge at home/work owning one will end up being a pain in the backside. So at the moment it's probably not for you.

But in the future when cars can do 250+ miles on a charge and Tesla, CCS and Chademo all have the 350kw chargers spending 10 mins to get 200+ miles of range won't be so bad.


At the moment it's not for people who can't park right outside their houses.
Do they have plans to knock all these houses down and supply everyone with new houses then.
Millions of houses have no direct parking outside. Even terraced housing with only pavement between front door and car isn't viable and this will only get worse as space becomes more limited.
It makes me laugh that the marketing of electric cars is pushed as being cheap to charge, cheap to run, cheap ved but the reality is that they are still cars for the wealthy.
It's like having a food bank for homeless people based on an island that you need your own helicopter to get to.


electricity is made using coal gas and petroleum it's really not as efficient at the moment as the government's make it out to be looking into it it looks like a electric car which gives around 100 miles to 30 kwh is equivalent to around 48mpg of petrol so not a hugely environmentally friendly car.
3 Likes #22
There are lots of arguments for electric cars not just economic. One of them is the removal of the pollution from the place of use. This will benefit everyone who lives near a road or in a city not just those who can afford to buy an electric car.
Roadside charging points are already in use up and down the country -in some cases in residential areas. The demonisation of diesel and forthcoming diesel scrappage scheme for pre 2007 cars will provide a tipping point for this sort of technology,

Edited By: tuohy16 on Feb 19, 2017 18:30
1 Like #23
monkeyhanger75
Electric cars are not for the near future until the UK gets its electricity generation up to scratch, we have just enough electricity to cover demand, if just 5% of the cars on UK roads were replaced with electric vehicles that need charging, then the UK's electricity supply would be screwed.


Errr, most folk charge their cars at night when demand is low. In fact even if 2/3rds of the cars on the road were electric out current amount of power would still cope and that's before they start rolling out systems that use electric car batteries to feed back into the system during peak times eliminating the need to be always oversupplying the network.

Suggest you stop reading the Daily Mail for your facts....
1 Like #24
fireman1
GAVINLEWISHUKD
nomisco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
This is if people charge at peak times. Most electric car owners charge at night when we have excess capacity.
As we move to electric prices will rise. This will encourage people to use more economy 7 and 10 style tarrifs.
In the long term two things will happen. One you will use your car to load balance your electric use. Fill the car at night when there is lots of electric and use car to grid and use some electric from the car at home.
On the bigger scale old battery packs will store excess power at night to be delivered to the grid at peak times.
All the above already happen in places around the world.
What happens if you can't park near your house?
Honestly if you can't charge at home/work owning one will end up being a pain in the backside. So at the moment it's probably not for you.
But in the future when cars can do 250+ miles on a charge and Tesla, CCS and Chademo all have the 350kw chargers spending 10 mins to get 200+ miles of range won't be so bad.
At the moment it's not for people who can't park right outside their houses.
Do they have plans to knock all these houses down and supply everyone with new houses then.
Millions of houses have no direct parking outside. Even terraced housing with only pavement between front door and car isn't viable and this will only get worse as space becomes more limited.
It makes me laugh that the marketing of electric cars is pushed as being cheap to charge, cheap to run, cheap ved but the reality is that they are still cars for the wealthy.
It's like having a food bank for homeless people based on an island that you need your own helicopter to get to.

No as I explained already for people who live in town houses and flats ect it's not there yet.
In the future you will top up at the supermarket, carparks or at a petrol station just as you do now. But instead of filling with petrol you will fill it with Electricity.

The big change will come when ICE cars start being excluded from places like citys. So city car park spaces will all have charge points.

What you need to look at is in basically 5 years we have gone from no Electric car market to where we are now.

In Norway (due to incentives) 1 in 3 new cars sold is Electric.
#25
MynameisM
fireman1
GAVINLEWISHUKD
nomisco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
This is if people charge at peak times. Most electric car owners charge at night when we have excess capacity.
As we move to electric prices will rise. This will encourage people to use more economy 7 and 10 style tarrifs.
In the long term two things will happen. One you will use your car to load balance your electric use. Fill the car at night when there is lots of electric and use car to grid and use some electric from the car at home.
On the bigger scale old battery packs will store excess power at night to be delivered to the grid at peak times.
All the above already happen in places around the world.
What happens if you can't park near your house?

Honestly if you can't charge at home/work owning one will end up being a pain in the backside. So at the moment it's probably not for you.

But in the future when cars can do 250+ miles on a charge and Tesla, CCS and Chademo all have the 350kw chargers spending 10 mins to get 200+ miles of range won't be so bad.


At the moment it's not for people who can't park right outside their houses.
Do they have plans to knock all these houses down and supply everyone with new houses then.
Millions of houses have no direct parking outside. Even terraced housing with only pavement between front door and car isn't viable and this will only get worse as space becomes more limited.
It makes me laugh that the marketing of electric cars is pushed as being cheap to charge, cheap to run, cheap ved but the reality is that they are still cars for the wealthy.
It's like having a food bank for homeless people based on an island that you need your own helicopter to get to.


electricity is made using coal gas and petroleum it's really not as efficient at the moment as the government's make it out to be looking into it it looks like a electric car which gives around 100 miles to 30 kwh is equivalent to around 48mpg of petrol so not a hugely environmentally friendly car.


Ecotricity supply electric that only comes from renewables so that's a load of tosh.
1 Like #26
MynameisM
fireman1
GAVINLEWISHUKD
nomisco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
This is if people charge at peak times. Most electric car owners charge at night when we have excess capacity.
As we move to electric prices will rise. This will encourage people to use more economy 7 and 10 style tarrifs.
In the long term two things will happen. One you will use your car to load balance your electric use. Fill the car at night when there is lots of electric and use car to grid and use some electric from the car at home.
On the bigger scale old battery packs will store excess power at night to be delivered to the grid at peak times.
All the above already happen in places around the world.
What happens if you can't park near your house?
Honestly if you can't charge at home/work owning one will end up being a pain in the backside. So at the moment it's probably not for you.
But in the future when cars can do 250+ miles on a charge and Tesla, CCS and Chademo all have the 350kw chargers spending 10 mins to get 200+ miles of range won't be so bad.
At the moment it's not for people who can't park right outside their houses.
Do they have plans to knock all these houses down and supply everyone with new houses then.
Millions of houses have no direct parking outside. Even terraced housing with only pavement between front door and car isn't viable and this will only get worse as space becomes more limited.
It makes me laugh that the marketing of electric cars is pushed as being cheap to charge, cheap to run, cheap ved but the reality is that they are still cars for the wealthy.
It's like having a food bank for homeless people based on an island that you need your own helicopter to get to.
electricity is made using coal gas and petroleum it's really not as efficient at the moment as the government's make it out to be looking into it it looks like a electric car which gives around 100 miles to 30 kwh is equivalent to around 48mpg of petrol so not a hugely environmentally friendly car.

So being conservative and saying you only get 100 from the 27kw of usable energy in the leaf will cost you less than £2 on economy 7*. A 50mpg car would use 2 gallons of fuel which would cost in the region of £11. Quite a difference.

Many people have solar panels too. As you get 50% FIT payments however much you actually feed in this also helps.

* You will pay slight more for your daytime usage.
1 Like #27
brookysm
MynameisM
fireman1
GAVINLEWISHUKD
nomisco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
This is if people charge at peak times. Most electric car owners charge at night when we have excess capacity.
As we move to electric prices will rise. This will encourage people to use more economy 7 and 10 style tarrifs.
In the long term two things will happen. One you will use your car to load balance your electric use. Fill the car at night when there is lots of electric and use car to grid and use some electric from the car at home.
On the bigger scale old battery packs will store excess power at night to be delivered to the grid at peak times.
All the above already happen in places around the world.
What happens if you can't park near your house?
Honestly if you can't charge at home/work owning one will end up being a pain in the backside. So at the moment it's probably not for you.
But in the future when cars can do 250+ miles on a charge and Tesla, CCS and Chademo all have the 350kw chargers spending 10 mins to get 200+ miles of range won't be so bad.
At the moment it's not for people who can't park right outside their houses.
Do they have plans to knock all these houses down and supply everyone with new houses then.
Millions of houses have no direct parking outside. Even terraced housing with only pavement between front door and car isn't viable and this will only get worse as space becomes more limited.
It makes me laugh that the marketing of electric cars is pushed as being cheap to charge, cheap to run, cheap ved but the reality is that they are still cars for the wealthy.
It's like having a food bank for homeless people based on an island that you need your own helicopter to get to.
electricity is made using coal gas and petroleum it's really not as efficient at the moment as the government's make it out to be looking into it it looks like a electric car which gives around 100 miles to 30 kwh is equivalent to around 48mpg of petrol so not a hugely environmentally friendly car.
Ecotricity supply electric that only comes from renewables so that's a load of tosh.

Exactly.

Breakdown for 2105.

Gas 30%
Renewables 25%
Coal 22%
Nuclear 21%
Oil/other 2%

Renewables are expected to hit 30% by 2020.
#28
I was talking about efficient not the cost as 13.7kwh electric is produced using 1 gallon of petroleum or around 1 pound of coal for 1kwh of electricity production. as these are still being used to provide the electric we use until we go say over 50 percent renewable it really isn't as good for the environment as is suggestive by the media government that's all I'm saying I would get one aswell if I could afford it.
#29
brookysm
MynameisM
fireman1
GAVINLEWISHUKD
nomisco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
This is if people charge at peak times. Most electric car owners charge at night when we have excess capacity.
As we move to electric prices will rise. This will encourage people to use more economy 7 and 10 style tarrifs.
In the long term two things will happen. One you will use your car to load balance your electric use. Fill the car at night when there is lots of electric and use car to grid and use some electric from the car at home.
On the bigger scale old battery packs will store excess power at night to be delivered to the grid at peak times.
All the above already happen in places around the world.
What happens if you can't park near your house?

Honestly if you can't charge at home/work owning one will end up being a pain in the backside. So at the moment it's probably not for you.

But in the future when cars can do 250+ miles on a charge and Tesla, CCS and Chademo all have the 350kw chargers spending 10 mins to get 200+ miles of range won't be so bad.


At the moment it's not for people who can't park right outside their houses.
Do they have plans to knock all these houses down and supply everyone with new houses then.
Millions of houses have no direct parking outside. Even terraced housing with only pavement between front door and car isn't viable and this will only get worse as space becomes more limited.
It makes me laugh that the marketing of electric cars is pushed as being cheap to charge, cheap to run, cheap ved but the reality is that they are still cars for the wealthy.
It's like having a food bank for homeless people based on an island that you need your own helicopter to get to.


electricity is made using coal gas and petroleum it's really not as efficient at the moment as the government's make it out to be looking into it it looks like a electric car which gives around 100 miles to 30 kwh is equivalent to around 48mpg of petrol so not a hugely environmentally friendly car.


Ecotricity supply electric that only comes from renewables so that's a load of tosh.


well that's not the whole uk is it we need look overall don't we.
1 Like #30
I really want an electric car but is this really that good of a deal?
1 Like #31
Leery24
I really want an electric car but is this really that good of a deal?

this is effectively a lease at £199 down and £199 a month for 6000 miles a year for 2 years where you have an option to buy

In this case the guaranteed future value is a bit high for a second hand electric car so buying it at the end of the lease may not be sensible

I'm not sure why Nissan are doing this but it may be a policy to get market share and/or to mitigate the effect of people waiting for the new 40kWh (or even 60kWh) model. You could wait for this and it's probable that the diesel scrappage scheme will make electric cars take off so it may be worth waiting for this if you have a EURO 3 car. However new cars don't get discounted and during the last scrappage scheme available deals got worse so this may not be the best strategy if you can live with 100 miles range. Obviously a car with double the capacity takes twice as long to charge

you get a free subsidised charging point (£500 from the government, £200 from Nissan)
its a comfortable top of the range car
its £2-4 for 100-150 miles
so if you can charge easily and you have an alternative car for longer journeys or you don't mind stopping for a coffee on the motorway every 80 miles or so it works (nissan will lend you for free a conventional car on some deals for a few days a year-but I'm not sure on this one)



Edited By: tuohy16 on Feb 20, 2017 10:11: More info
#32
MynameisM
fireman1
GAVINLEWISHUKD
nomisco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
This is if people charge at peak times. Most electric car owners charge at night when we have excess capacity.
As we move to electric prices will rise. This will encourage people to use more economy 7 and 10 style tarrifs.
In the long term two things will happen. One you will use your car to load balance your electric use. Fill the car at night when there is lots of electric and use car to grid and use some electric from the car at home.
On the bigger scale old battery packs will store excess power at night to be delivered to the grid at peak times.
All the above already happen in places around the world.
What happens if you can't park near your house?
Honestly if you can't charge at home/work owning one will end up being a pain in the backside. So at the moment it's probably not for you.
But in the future when cars can do 250+ miles on a charge and Tesla, CCS and Chademo all have the 350kw chargers spending 10 mins to get 200+ miles of range won't be so bad.
At the moment it's not for people who can't park right outside their houses.
Do they have plans to knock all these houses down and supply everyone with new houses then.
Millions of houses have no direct parking outside. Even terraced housing with only pavement between front door and car isn't viable and this will only get worse as space becomes more limited.
It makes me laugh that the marketing of electric cars is pushed as being cheap to charge, cheap to run, cheap ved but the reality is that they are still cars for the wealthy.
It's like having a food bank for homeless people based on an island that you need your own helicopter to get to.
electricity is made using coal gas and petroleum it's really not as efficient at the moment as the government's make it out to be looking into it it looks like a electric car which gives around 100 miles to 30 kwh is equivalent to around 48mpg of petrol so not a hugely environmentally friendly car.

Like your teacher said "show your working" as you are talking utter tosh.
#33
Leery24
I really want an electric car but is this really that good of a deal?

It's the best I've seen, we ordered one.
2 Likes #34
brookysm
MynameisM
fireman1
GAVINLEWISHUKD
nomisco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
This is if people charge at peak times. Most electric car owners charge at night when we have excess capacity.
As we move to electric prices will rise. This will encourage people to use more economy 7 and 10 style tarrifs.
In the long term two things will happen. One you will use your car to load balance your electric use. Fill the car at night when there is lots of electric and use car to grid and use some electric from the car at home.
On the bigger scale old battery packs will store excess power at night to be delivered to the grid at peak times.
All the above already happen in places around the world.
What happens if you can't park near your house?
Honestly if you can't charge at home/work owning one will end up being a pain in the backside. So at the moment it's probably not for you.

But in the future when cars can do 250+ miles on a charge and Tesla, CCS and Chademo all have the 350kw chargers spending 10 mins to get 200+ miles of range won't be so bad.

At the moment it's not for people who can't park right outside their houses.
Do they have plans to knock all these houses down and supply everyone with new houses then.
Millions of houses have no direct parking outside. Even terraced housing with only pavement between front door and car isn't viable and this will only get worse as space becomes more limited.
It makes me laugh that the marketing of electric cars is pushed as being cheap to charge, cheap to run, cheap ved but the reality is that they are still cars for the wealthy.
It's like having a food bank for homeless people based on an island that you need your own helicopter to get to.

electricity is made using coal gas and petroleum it's really not as efficient at the moment as the government's make it out to be looking into it it looks like a electric car which gives around 100 miles to 30 kwh is equivalent to around 48mpg of petrol so not a hugely environmentally friendly car.

Ecotricity supply electric that only comes from renewables so that's a load of tosh.

How do they manage that then? Nuclear, goal, gas, wind etc are all connected to the same national grid. You have no idea where those electrons came from you only have the word of your supplier that they buy only the green ones.
#35
fireman1
GAVINLEWISHUKD
nomisco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
This is if people charge at peak times. Most electric car owners charge at night when we have excess capacity.
As we move to electric prices will rise. This will encourage people to use more economy 7 and 10 style tarrifs.
In the long term two things will happen. One you will use your car to load balance your electric use. Fill the car at night when there is lots of electric and use car to grid and use some electric from the car at home.
On the bigger scale old battery packs will store excess power at night to be delivered to the grid at peak times.
All the above already happen in places around the world.
What happens if you can't park near your house?
Honestly if you can't charge at home/work owning one will end up being a pain in the backside. So at the moment it's probably not for you.

But in the future when cars can do 250+ miles on a charge and Tesla, CCS and Chademo all have the 350kw chargers spending 10 mins to get 200+ miles of range won't be so bad.

At the moment it's not for people who can't park right outside their houses.
Do they have plans to knock all these houses down and supply everyone with new houses then.
Millions of houses have no direct parking outside. Even terraced housing with only pavement between front door and car isn't viable and this will only get worse as space becomes more limited.
It makes me laugh that the marketing of electric cars is pushed as being cheap to charge, cheap to run, cheap ved but the reality is that they are still cars for the wealthy.
It's like having a food bank for homeless people based on an island that you need your own helicopter to get to.

"cars for the wealthy" are you drunk? It's cheap motoring for the sensible. Having a driveway is a choice, if you made the right choices you could have one too. The savings from an electric would likely pay the extra mortgage.
#36
Could be argued that if you only have a short commute then get on your bike.....

But deal still hot as better than dirty diesel.
1 Like #37
jackvdbuk
monkeyhanger75
Electric cars are not for the near future until the UK gets its electricity generation up to scratch, we have just enough electricity to cover demand, if just 5% of the cars on UK roads were replaced with electric vehicles that need charging, then the UK's electricity supply would be screwed.
Do you have a source to this?

Official status here

Edited By: OrribleHarry on Feb 20, 2017 18:45
2 Likes #38
OrribleHarry
jackvdbuk
monkeyhanger75
Electric cars are not for the near future until the UK gets its electricity generation up to scratch, we have just enough electricity to cover demand, if just 5% of the cars on UK roads were replaced with electric vehicles that need charging, then the UK's electricity supply would be screwed.
Do you have a source to this?
Official status here

UK Peak demand is about 55 gigawatts (GW). The night time load is about 38 GW even in winter. The spare capacity is therefore 17 GW according to gov.uk figures. Enough for about 20 million cars at average usage without the need for a single additional power station.

Figures taken from:
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/295225/Seasonal_variations_in_electricity_demand.pdf
#39
I don't think there has been a single post about this deal ie cheaper at x or good price (I say think as it dawned on my I was reading the post debating our energy 'crisis' not the Nissan leaf... maybe there are a couple out of 35)

Also hot as I think its a good price if the car is right for you.

Edited By: jamhops on Feb 20, 2017 18:52
#40
Aside from arguing the toss about the pros and cons of this car. Im gonna say this is a good deal. Voted hot

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