NISSAN QASHQAI DIESEL HATCHBACK 1.5 dCi N-Tec 5dr - £692.68 initial payment & £230.89 p/m inc VAT over 24 Months £6003.14 @ fleetprices.co.uk - HotUKDeals
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NISSAN QASHQAI DIESEL HATCHBACK 1.5 dCi N-Tec 5dr - £692.68 initial payment & £230.89 p/m inc VAT over 24 Months £6,003.14 @ fleetprices.co.uk

£6003.14 @ Fleetprices
This new model of the Qashqai is best suited for people looking for a bigger feel car with EXCELLENT MPG fuel economy. EC Urban 67.3 mpg EC Extra Urban 78.5 mpg EC Combined 74.3 mpg 10,000 mil… Read More
jambone Avatar
2y, 5m agoFound 2 years, 5 months ago
This new model of the Qashqai is best suited for people looking for a bigger feel car with EXCELLENT MPG fuel economy.

EC Urban 67.3 mpg
EC Extra Urban 78.5 mpg
EC Combined 74.3 mpg

10,000 miles per annum

£230.89
inc.VAT per month.

Initial Rental:
£692.68 inc.VAT

Works out at £6003.14 inc VAT over the 2 Years (£250.13 a month). Which for a car of it's size and great fuel economy seems like a pretty good deal
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8 Likes #1
There are lots of people who don't know whether leasing is a cheaper/better option than buying, so here are some examples:

Example 1

Buy a used 2007 Nissan Qashqai 1.5 diesel £6,289 with 10,000 mile per year on the clock (70,000ish)

Example car(closest I could find to the specification above)


Road tax p.a. = £145

MOT* = £40

AVG yearly repairs* = £300

10,000 miles of diesel @ 47.1mpg 118.7p per litre = £1146.50

Depreciation**= £943.35

Loss of interest on capital outlay*** = £167.89

Yearly cost to run = £2,742.74****


Example 2

This Nissan Qashqai Deal

Road tax p.a. = £0 (<100g/km co2 emissions)

MOT = N/A

AVG yearly repairs = Probably £0 as it is a brand new car and has a manufactures warranty

10,000 miles of diesel @ 67.3mpg 118.7p per litre = £800

Cost of lease p.a. = £3001.57

Depreciation = N/A

Yearly cost to run = £3801.57****



Example 3

A standard £2,000 diesel car, you may be getting 40mpg. EDIT: Adjusted mpg (and figures) from 30 to 40 in line with comments that 30mpg for a £2000 car was too low

Road tax p.a.* = £240~

MOT* = £40~

Avg yearly repairs* = £300~

10,000 miles of diesel @ 40mpg* 118.7p per litre = £1,350

Avg Depreciation** = £300~ p.a

Loss of interest on capital outlay*** = £39.22

Yearly cost to run = £2,269.22****


Other things to consider:

Purchased car
Pros:

You could drive as many miles as you like and not have to worry about mileage penalties you would get with a lease (but beware, more miles = more depreciation)

You could carry out your own serving to keep costs down (again, this may affect the re sale value)

One or two small scratches might not bother you or a potential buyer

Cons

If you want to sell it and achieve a good price in line with the depreciation remember the cost to advertise it, time spent/effort/stress in showing the car.

Large initial outlay

Less reliable than a new car


Leased car:
Pros

Brand new car, exact spec & colour you want (better spec will cost you more)

No large initial outlay

More reliable than a used car

Cons

You need to pay for any scratches to be repaired before the end of the lease.

Consider how you would manage payments due to extenuating circumstances, job loss, etc.


NB: servicing has not been included in examples as purchased and leased cars will need to be serviced regularly.

*Please adjust figures as needed from your experience
**http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Car_costs#Depreciation
***Interest @ 3%p.a. from Santander account & £692.68 deducted from loss of interest of capital to account for the £692.68 initial lease outlay
****each addition year for purchased cars will be cheaper to run due to compounded depreciation

For the above examples it does cost an extra £1,050 ish a year to lease (£87.50pm) but you do get a brand new car. Is it worth it? That's up each individual person to decide





Edited By: jambone on Dec 15, 2014 10:00: Correction of figures
#2
can you buy leas car after leas end - if yes what is the prica to pay ???
1 Like #3
jambone
There are lots of people who don't know whether leasing is a cheaper/better option than buying, so here are some examples:

Example 1

Buy a used 2007 Nissan Qashqai 1.5 diesel £6,289 with 10,000 mile per year on the clock (70,000ish)

Example car (closest I could find to the specification above)


Road tax p.a. = £145

MOT* = £40

AVG yearly repairs* = £300

10,000 miles of diesel @ 47.1mpg 118.7p per litre = £1146.50

Depreciation**= £943.35

Loss of interest on capital outlay*** = £167.89

Yearly cost to run = £2,742.74****


Example 2

This Nissan Qashqai Deal

Road tax p.a. = £0 (<100g/km co2 emissions)

MOT = N/A

AVG yearly repairs = Probably £0 as it is a brand new car and has a manufactures warranty

10,000 miles of diesel @ 67.3mpg 118.7p per litre = £800

Cost of lease p.a. = £3001.57

Depreciation = N/A

Yearly cost to run = £3801.57****



Example 3

A standard £2,000 diesel car, you may be getting 30mpg if you are lucky.

Road tax p.a.* = £240~

MOT* = £40~

Avg yearly repairs* = £300~

10,000 miles of diesel @ 30mpg* 118.7p per litre = £1,800

Avg Depreciation** = £300~ p.a

Loss of interest on capital outlay*** = £39.22

Yearly cost to run = £2,719.22****


Other things to consider:

Purchased car
Pros:

You could drive as many miles as you like and not have to worry about mileage penalties you would get with a lease (but beware, more miles = more depreciation)

You could carry our your own serving to keep costs down (again, this may affect the re sale value)

One or two small scratches might not bother you or a potential buyer

Cons

If you want to sell it and achieve a good price in line with the depreciation remember the cost to advertise it, time spent/effort/stress in showing the car.

Large initial outlay

Less reliable than a new car


Leased car:
Pros

Brand new car, exact spec & colour you want (better spec will cost you more)

No large initial outlay

More reliable than a used car

Cons

You need to pay for any scratches to be repaired before the end of the lease.

Consider how you would manage payments due to extenuating circumstances, job loss, etc.


NB: servicing has not been included in examples as purchased and leased cars will need to be serviced regularly.

*Please adjust figures as needed from your experience
**http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Car_costs#Depreciation
***Interest @ 3%p.a. from Santander account & £692.68 deducted from loss of interest of capital to account for the £692.68 initial lease outlay
****each addition year for purchased cars will be cheaper to run due to compounded depreciation

Yeah the 30mpg from a £2000 is a load of poop

My 54 megane : 60+mpg
My 53 megane 50+ mpg
My 1,4 petrol c4 : 35mpg
My 11 bmw 55mpg

Bassing your fuel on mpg stated by the.company is very bad

Also on own used cars you have resale value! Unlike a lease
including the depreciation in a yearly.cost isnt very effective

Ie £2000 for a 06is plate 1.5 dci megane. Resale in 2 years 1500. Resale in 6 years 1000 scrap value in 10 years 500
#4
Hi All, Looking for a new/ish car next year and want something like this style of car but one what will hold its price I know very little about cars so any ideas please x
1 Like #5
Yeah agree with the poor MPG figures. My 10 year old 160,000 miles £2000 320d BMW averages 43mpg.
#6
Thank god I'm on motability I'm allowed 20k a year and free service + insurance + tax + rac breakdown cover
#7
andofgod
Thank god I'm on motability I'm allowed 20k a year and free service + insurance + tax + rac breakdown cover


It still costs you though as you loose out on benefits in other areas.
#8
Ye but I'd rather pay out of benefits than have pressure of knowing my limit is coming up, plus the damn credit checks
#9
@jordni and 5erge

Yes I agree, there are many older used cars with much better than 30mpgs but also there are a lot with much worse than 30mpg, I was only trying to give a rough estimate for someone with an older car.

Also jordni, I believe adding the depreciation in is the only fair way to get the true yearly cost. Yes there is money back at the end, but it's money, less each of the years depreciation cost, so I believe that figure stands unless you could advise me of a better option. Also remember that while depreciation (in these calculations) is the same percentage every year, the actual amount in £ in less each year. E.g. Year 1 15% of £2000 = £300, year 2 15% 1,700 is £255' etc

And basing the mpg's the companies give is the fairest way, however it's not the companies that come up with the figures it the EU.

Edited By: jambone on Dec 15, 2014 07:37
#10
5erge
Yeah agree with the poor MPG figures. My 10 year old 160,000 miles £2000 320d BMW averages 43mpg.

Fair point but I was only giving it as an example as there are lots of cars of that age producing less than 30mpg.

And you are doing well to get 43mpg from your 320d, others aren't quite as lucky http://www.fuelly.com/car/bmw/320d
1 Like #11
jambone
@jordni and 5erge

Yes I agree, there are many older used cars with much better than 30mpgs but also there are a lot with much worse than 30mpg, I was only trying to give a rough estimate for someone with an older car.

Also jordni, I believe adding the depreciation in is the only fair way to get the true yearly cost. Yes there is money back at the end, but it's money, less each of the years depreciation cost, so I believe that figure stands unless you could advise me of a better option. Also remember that while depreciation (in these calculations) is the same percentage every year, the actual amount in £ in less each year. E.g. Year 1 15% of £2000 = £300, year 2 15% 1,700 is £255' etc


I still found your post informative though. Nice to see all the figures in one post. People can adjust price and MPG accordingly for their own car.
1 Like #12
ericabro
Hi All, Looking for a new/ish car next year and want something like this style of car but one what will hold its price I know very little about cars so any ideas please x

My advice would be, worry more about getting good fuel economy than anything else, that will be you're largest yearly outgoing so try and reduce/minimise that first.

To find out which cars hold their value the best head over to google and their are a lot of articles on the subject but if you want to do your own research then go on to autotrader, pick the exact car and model you are going to compare, find a newish one, 2014 with around 10,000 miles on the clock, take note of the price, next find a 2013 model of the same car with about 20,000 miles, again take note of the price and continue back as far as you need and you'll have a rough idea of what that car will sell for in X number of years with 10,000 miles per year on the clock


Edited By: jambone on Dec 15, 2014 07:57
2 Likes #13
The general concensus of brand new cars right now is to expect 70% of the combined mpg value around the doors in the summer and maybe 85% on a long motorway run. The use of start-stop systems has really skewed the EU test cycle figures, considering 24% of the test cycle has the car at a standstill.

My "67mpg" 2013 Golf GTD does about 42mpg in the winter and 48mpg in the summer on my 13 mile commute, and the best i've gotten out of it was 58mpg going from Newcastle to Leeds (105 miles).

Oddly enough, my car was doing 10% better than it is now before it had its first service. They put some kind of engine management software change in place that made the car run no better (although it runs a bit cooler when worked hard) but hit my fuel economy by an average 4mpg.

Expect to average about 50mpg in this Qashqai and you won't be disappointed.


Edited By: monkeyhanger75 on Dec 15, 2014 08:00
1 Like #14
monkeyhanger75
The general concensus of brand new cars right now is to expect 70% of the combined mpg value around the doors in the summer and maybe 85% on a long motorway run. The use of start-stop systems has really skewed the EU test cycle figures, considering 24% of the test cycle has the car at a standstill.

My "67mpg" 2013 Golf GTD does about 42mpg in the winter and 48mpg in the summer on my 13 mile commute, and the best i've gotten out of it was 58mpg going from Newcastle to Leeds (105 miles).

Expect to average about 50mpg in this Qashqai and you won't be disappointed.

Couldn't agree more!. I have owned all 3 generations of Mazda 6 Sport diesel and this last generation claimed about 63 mpg for combined (urban/motorway) driving. Best I've had has been about 55 mpg for motorway only and about 48-50 mpg for combined. My older 2nd gen (without stop/start) easily reached a combined figure of 50mpg (manufacturer claimed 52mpg) and on a good motorway only run it'd do 55+.

Mazda have never been so inaccurate with their figures. I know others with the same motor have actually had worse results than me so there's just no way anyone could attain those results....unless they were going downhill with the wind and slipped into neutral.
#15
jambone
ericabro
Hi All, Looking for a new/ish car next year and want something like this style of car but one what will hold its price I know very little about cars so any ideas please x
My advice would be, wort more about the fuel economy than anything else, that will be you're largest yearly outgoing to try and reduce/minimise that first. To find out which cars hold their value the best head over to google and their are a lot of articles on the subject but if you want to do you're own research then go on autotrader, pick the exact car and model you are going to compare, find a newish one, 2014 with around 10,000 miles on the clock, take note of the price, next find a 2013 model of the same car with about 20,000 miles, again take note of the price and continue back as far as you need and you'll have a rough idea of what that car will sell for in X number of years with 10,000 miles per year on the clock

Unless you're going 3+ year old on a car worth less than £8k, i'd say worry about the depreciation first, it will usually be substantially more than the difference in fuel economy between 2 cars that aren't massively different in performance.

In my example of my Golf GTD vs BMW 120D bought new, the mpg is similar between the 2 (almost not worth considering), but the Golf will be worth £2k more after 3 years of ownership. If you are going for a 2 year old model however, and keeping it 3 years, the BMW will lose less in depreciation as it's lost so much more already.

Buy/Lease a new car that holds it's value well (or if the lease costs are less than the depreciation you would suffer), for one that doesn't, you should buy used and let someone else cop for the lion's share of the depreciation. In some cases you can buy a new car and run it for 3 years cheaper than a 2 year old one, depending on it's depreciation profile and what doscounts you can achieve. My 18 month old GTD can be found on a VW used forecourt for a higher price than I paid for it (with discount) when new.
#16
DAZZ2000
monkeyhanger75
The general concensus of brand new cars right now is to expect 70% of the combined mpg value around the doors in the summer and maybe 85% on a long motorway run. The use of start-stop systems has really skewed the EU test cycle figures, considering 24% of the test cycle has the car at a standstill.My "67mpg" 2013 Golf GTD does about 42mpg in the winter and 48mpg in the summer on my 13 mile commute, and the best i've gotten out of it was 58mpg going from Newcastle to Leeds (105 miles).Expect to average about 50mpg in this Qashqai and you won't be disappointed.
Couldn't agree more!. I have owned all 3 generations of Mazda 6 Sport diesel and this last generation claimed about 63 mpg for combined (urban/motorway) driving. Best I've had has been about 55 mpg for motorway only and about 48-50 mpg for combined. My older 2nd gen (without stop/start) easily reached a combined figure of 50mpg (manufacturer claimed 52mpg) and on a good motorway only run it'd do 55+.Mazda have never been so inaccurate with their figures. I know others with the same motor have actually had worse results than me so there's just no way anyone could attain those results....unless they were going downhill with the wind and slipped into neutral.

They're all doing it now. My last car a VW Scirocco 170TDI (with nigh-on the same engine) didn't have start-stop and was 53mpg combined, I easily got past that in the summer on a short journey and could beat it on a longer journey in the winter. People started to kick off about the innaccurate figures in 2013, so you'll now see them all with a backside covering statement like "for comparison purposes between manufacturers only, may not reflect real life driving situations".
#17
ericabro
Hi All, Looking for a new/ish car next year and want something like this style of car but one what will hold its price I know very little about cars so any ideas please x

This might sound like i'm being a bit of a VW fanboy, but if you want brand new, the VW Tiguan has pretty much the best residuals in this class of car and is well equipped as standard. VW reliability from new is pretty average these days (as is Nissan, since they started used Renault tech), but they are still very solid mechanically once any initial niggles are resolved under warranty, and are very reliable generally in the longer term (my dad traded in his MK5 Golf GT TDI last year with 123k miles on the clock and it hasn't missed a beat).

If you were buying nearly new, I wouldn't go with the Tiguan at all. They'll be selling 1 year old examples for 90% of list price and you can achieve 12% discount on a new one, so going nearly new doesn't make sense at all. Once you get into the used category, you want one that's suffered a large chunk of depreciation already - maybe a Ford Kuga, Renault Captur, or even a Qashqai.

Of course, if you are happy tolease and won't go over the stated mileage allowance, you know exactly what you are getting into with a lease, fixed monthly costs for a new car with a warranty. No hassle, just hand it back at the end of your term.

Edited By: monkeyhanger75 on Dec 15, 2014 08:28
#18
Comment
#19
jambone
There are lots of people who don't know whether leasing is a cheaper/better option than buying, so here are some examples:

Example 1

Buy a used 2007 Nissan Qashqai 1.5 diesel £6,289 with 10,000 mile per year on the clock (70,000ish)

Example car(closest I could find to the specification above)


Road tax p.a. = £145

MOT* = £40

AVG yearly repairs* = £300

10,000 miles of diesel @ 47.1mpg 118.7p per litre = £1146.50

Depreciation**= £943.35

Loss of interest on capital outlay*** = £167.89

Yearly cost to run = £2,742.74****


Example 2

This Nissan Qashqai Deal

Road tax p.a. = £0 (<100g/km co2 emissions)

MOT = N/A

AVG yearly repairs = Probably £0 as it is a brand new car and has a manufactures warranty

10,000 miles of diesel @ 67.3mpg 118.7p per litre = £800

Cost of lease p.a. = £3001.57

Depreciation = N/A

Yearly cost to run = £3801.57****



Example 3

A standard £2,000 diesel car, you may be getting 30mpg if you are lucky. EDIT: there are lots of older car with better and worse the 30mpg, this is just to give an average example

Road tax p.a.* = £240~

MOT* = £40~

Avg yearly repairs* = £300~

10,000 miles of diesel @ 30mpg* 118.7p per litre = £1,800

Avg Depreciation** = £300~ p.a

Loss of interest on capital outlay*** = £39.22

Yearly cost to run = £2,719.22****


Other things to consider:

Purchased car
Pros:

You could drive as many miles as you like and not have to worry about mileage penalties you would get with a lease (but beware, more miles = more depreciation)

You could carry our your own serving to keep costs down (again, this may affect the re sale value)

One or two small scratches might not bother you or a potential buyer

Cons

If you want to sell it and achieve a good price in line with the depreciation remember the cost to advertise it, time spent/effort/stress in showing the car.

Large initial outlay

Less reliable than a new car


Leased car:
Pros

Brand new car, exact spec & colour you want (better spec will cost you more)

No large initial outlay

More reliable than a used car

Cons

You need to pay for any scratches to be repaired before the end of the lease.

Consider how you would manage payments due to extenuating circumstances, job loss, etc.


NB: servicing has not been included in examples as purchased and leased cars will need to be serviced regularly.

*Please adjust figures as needed from your experience
**http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Car_costs#Depreciation
***Interest @ 3%p.a. from Santander account & £692.68 deducted from loss of interest of capital to account for the £692.68 initial lease outlay
****each addition year for purchased cars will be cheaper to run due to compounded depreciation

For the above examples it does cost an extra £1,050 ish a year to lease (£87.50pm) but you do get a brand new car. Is it worth it? That's up each individual person to decide



Interesting and well thought through, I think you are maybe a bit optimistic about the new car MPG, and 30mpg for a £2K used diesel would be at the extreme end. Difficult to quantify, but there is also a 'risk of huge garage bill' factor - example 1 and 3 both carry this, the lease wouldn't as its not your car and its under warranty anyway. Even ownership of a new car carries more risk than a lease - how many times have we seen manufacturers reluctant to believe owner experiences of problems, dealerships fobbing owners off?

There are lots of ways to look at this, and I think this is a why people sometimes get a little heated and are reluctant to accept that anyone not doing what they think is the best solution can also have some good and valid points.

I get a company car allowance. I could think 'car money' and blow the lot on a lease of a really nice vehicle. But I have got into the habit of accepting the risk of ownership of a 4/5 year old high mileage vehicles with impeccable service history, costing around the £5K mark. The downside is the risk of a big bill (but then i do have money to cover it) - the upside is that I save a lot of money, as I am not paying for a lease or a loan every month - and after 2 years expect it to be worth at least £3K. Thats working well for me at the moment, my car might have 156K miles on it, but you wouldn't know it - it does 50mpg easily and nothing has gone wrong.
2 Likes #20
Your examples are pure fiction.

You really believe that a newer Qashqai with the same Renault engine with a little fettling and I assume start/stop will get 20mpg more than the previous model?

Try closer to 5.
http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/realmpg/nissan/qashqai-2007
http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/realmpg/nissan/qashqai-2014

As for "a standard £2,000 diesel car, you may be getting 30mpg if you are lucky", utter rubbish. My previous car was a 2004 307 HDI had 136bhp and would at worst do 45mpg on average, on a run close to 60mpg.

All you've done is exaggerated the figures in favour of leasing over running a used car. What you should've done is compared it against purchasing a new one.

Are you a politician by any chance?
1 Like #21
Have thought about leasing before but the mileage has always put me off. Wouldn't want to think "We can't drive that far as i don't want to go over my mileage allowance" Would always be in the back of my mind, plus would they be finicky about the scratches etc. when you get it back and therefore any savings you did make would be wiped out?

Edited By: wozwebs on Dec 15, 2014 09:30
1 Like #22
Id wait for the 1.6 petrol to come out.
1 Like #23
Still don't understand why people lease (normal) cars. At the end of the lease you have nothing to show for your money. If anything happens to your income, you won't be able to afford the car, leaving you with nothing. I get leasing high - end cars, changing up for a newer model if you can afford it. But a Qashqai or any other normal car? Madness.
1 Like #24
monkeyhanger75
jambone
ericabro
Hi All, Looking for a new/ish car next year and want something like this style of car but one what will hold its price I know very little about cars so any ideas please x
My advice would be, wort more about the fuel economy than anything else, that will be you're largest yearly outgoing to try and reduce/minimise that first. To find out which cars hold their value the best head over to google and their are a lot of articles on the subject but if you want to do you're own research then go on autotrader, pick the exact car and model you are going to compare, find a newish one, 2014 with around 10,000 miles on the clock, take note of the price, next find a 2013 model of the same car with about 20,000 miles, again take note of the price and continue back as far as you need and you'll have a rough idea of what that car will sell for in X number of years with 10,000 miles per year on the clock

Unless you're going 3+ year old on a car worth less than £8k, i'd say worry about the depreciation first, it will usually be substantially more than the difference in fuel economy between 2 cars that aren't massively different in performance.

In my example of my Golf GTD vs BMW 120D bought new, the mpg is similar between the 2 (almost not worth considering), but the Golf will be worth £2k more after 3 years of ownership. If you are going for a 2 year old model however, and keeping it 3 years, the BMW will lose less in depreciation as it's lost so much more already.

Buy/Lease a new car that holds it's value well (or if the lease costs are less than the depreciation you would suffer), for one that doesn't, you should buy used and let someone else cop for the lion's share of the depreciation. In some cases you can buy a new car and run it for 3 years cheaper than a 2 year old one, depending on it's depreciation profile and what doscounts you can achieve. My 18 month old GTD can be found on a VW used forecourt for a higher price than I paid for it (with discount) when new.

I agree, depreciation/or whichever is the most loss contributing factor is obviously more important, I was referring to it's better to look for better fuel company than the look/gadgets of the car. E.g. BMW 318d vs 325d.

Sorry It wasn't clear :)

Edited By: jambone on Dec 15, 2014 09:34
banned 1 Like #25
Yadda Yadda Yadda..

Paying bucketload of cash upfront the monthly to borrow a car.

New cars break down too.

Buying used much more cost effective always will be.

Leases are a complete ripoff.

Cold.
2 Likes #26
oddballjamie
Your examples are pure fiction.

You really believe that a newer Qashqai with the same Renault engine with a little fettling and I assume start/stop will get 20mpg more than the previous model?

Try closer to 5.
http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/realmpg/nissan/qashqai-2007
http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/realmpg/nissan/qashqai-2014

As for "a standard £2,000 diesel car, you may be getting 30mpg if you are lucky", utter rubbish. My previous car was a 2004 307 HDI had 136bhp and would at worst do 45mpg on average, on a run close to 60mpg.

All you've done is exaggerated the figures in favour of leasing over running a used car. What you should've done is compared it against purchasing a new one.

Are you a politician by any chance?

Couldn't have put better Jamie, well said ;)
1 Like #27
oddballjamie
Your examples are pure fiction.

You really believe that a newer Qashqai with the same Renault engine with a little fettling and I assume start/stop will get 20mpg more than the previous model?

Try closer to 5.
http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/realmpg/nissan/qashqai-2007
http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/realmpg/nissan/qashqai-2014

As for "a standard £2,000 diesel car, you may be getting 30mpg if you are lucky", utter rubbish. My previous car was a 2004 307 HDI had 136bhp and would at worst do 45mpg on average, on a run close to 60mpg.

All you've done is exaggerated the figures in favour of leasing over running a used car. What you should've done is compared it against purchasing a new one.

Are you a politician by any chance?

I have had both lease and owned old cars, currently looking around for a good lease and running a stop gap 30mpg diesel that was given to me worth about £2,000.

Thanks for chalking up my breakdown for people that have no idea to "pure fiction". I guess my links and sources are all fiction too. I was only trying to help more by giving people more info.

In regards to the Qashqai engines, I was only going off the mpg figures published, that's what my research was based on as i had shown.

Did I exaggerate the second had Qashqai too by any chance? I felt that £1000 a year less for a used Qashqai was a good option for people who don't want a lease.

Either you were trying to be rude or that is just your nature, sorry I offended you so much with my attempt of help. Please spend an hour of your time researching and giving better examples. And maybe you could do a comparison of a lease of this over buying a new one rather than trolling and telling me what "I should have done"

Edited By: jambone on Dec 15, 2014 10:05: Edit
1 Like #28
wozwebs
Have thought about leasing before but the mileage has always put me off. Wouldn't want to think "We can't drive that far as i don't want to go over my mileage allowance" Would always be in the back of my mind, plus would they be finicky about the scratches etc. when you get it back and therefore any savings you did make would be wiped out?

It depends how much the per mile penalty is for going over. It was 6p on a lease car i had a few years ago. So go over by 1000 miles, you pay £60. So its wasnt a big deal.

There are definitions about what constitutes 'fair wear and tear', numbers and depth of scratches - in my experience the assessment was done very professionally and fairly. I guess you have to take a view on what damage your cars usually get in two years? If you park it on the street in a rough area - a flashy new lease car might not be a good move.
#29
stoney73
Still don't understand why people lease (normal) cars. At the end of the lease you have nothing to show for your money. If anything happens to your income, you won't be able to afford the car, leaving you with nothing. I get leasing high - end cars, changing up for a newer model if you can afford it. But a Qashqai or any other normal car? Madness.

If the lease is cheaper than the depreciation suffered over the desired period of ownership by buying, then lease. This rule applies equally to a Qashqai or Aston Martin. No one can account for the potential of losing their income in the deal - that's something you have to decide on for yourself when you tie yourself into anything, whether that be buying furniture on 0% finance, cars, mortgages etc. There's insurance for that if you're very risk averse.
1 Like #30
lolyehright
Yadda Yadda Yadda.. Paying bucketload of cash upfront the monthly to borrow a car. New cars break down too. Buying used much more cost effective always will be. Leases are a complete ripoff. Cold.

When a new car breaks down though, it is covered under warranty, when an older car breaks down you'll be paying for it. For some this is the main reason they buy/lease new - fixed price motoring. If you buy a 4 year old car that came with 3 years warranty from new and something catastrophic happens, you'll be left with a huge and unplanned bill,
1 Like #31
Leasing a new car is sensible, especially a modern diesel, especially one with the Renault 1.5 dci engine. Buying and keeping one can work out very expensive. A quick google will show very expensive turbo problems etc. My wives friend had to scrap hers when the turbo lunched itself.
Buying a solid non turbo petrol is probably the cheapest if you intend to keep it move than 5 years.
1 Like #32
Is it possible to use a cheap car / current car as a deposit (initial rental) ?
#33
Ceejay1974
Is it possible to use a cheap car / current car as a deposit (initial rental) ?

No. they want cold, hard cash. It'll be a chore for them to convert your car into cash by selling it.

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