NS&I Index-Linked Savings Certificates - HotUKDeals
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NS&I Index-Linked Savings Certificates

ses6jwg Avatar
6y, 10m agoFound 6 years, 10 months ago
Don't let the government steal your savings with their engineered inflation!

Inflation = less public debt but also less from your savings!

Novemeber to December saw the biggest jump in inflation since RECORDS BEGAN.

Terms:

- Invest from £100 up to £15,000 per person, per issue
- 3 or 5 year issues availiable
- You can withdraw at any time, but withdraw before 1 year and recieve no interest
- TAX FREE
- Current issue is RPI + 1% (As of Jan 2010 this is 3.4% TAX FREE) but inflation is expected to rise further.
- 100% Guaranteed by UK government
- Apply online, by post, telephone or via Post Office

"With our Inflation-Beating Savings, you can be sure that the value of your savings will stay ahead of any increase in the Retail Prices Index over the investment term. This gives you real peace of mind.

Because inflation fluctuates, you wont know exactly how much you are going to receive until your Certificates mature. But you can be sure that your money will have more spending power."
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banned 1 Like #1
> Novemeber to December saw the biggest jump in inflation since RECORDS BEGAN.

How do you define jump? In real terms or percentage of percentage terms?

2 % inflation to 3% is either a jump of 1%, or a 50% jump: (3-2)/2 x 100
1% inflation to 2% is either a jump of 1%, or 100% jump: (2-1)/1x 100
0% inflation to 1% is either a jump of 1%, or an infinite jump: (1-0)/0 x 100
#2
NobbyB
> Novemeber to December saw the biggest jump in inflation since RECORDS BEGAN.

How do you define jump? In real terms or percentage of percentage terms?

2 % inflation to 3% is either a jump of 1%, or a 50% jump: (3-2)/2 x 100
1% inflation to 2% is either a jump of 1%, or 100% jump: (2-1)/1x 100
0% inflation to 1% is either a jump of 1%, or an infinite jump: (1-0)/0 x 100


And of course it was fuelled by the PM tampering with VAT. Now this is no longer an issue inflation could easily fall.
#3
Puting money into this is lending money to a bankrupt country.
#4
pedroman
Puting money into this is lending money to a bankrupt country.


Ummmm. If the country is bankrupt then where do you consider a safe haven for your money? Remember that in shares/ corporate bonds for everyone who thinks today is a good day to buy there is someone else who thinks that it is a good day to sell & many overseas banks have been supported at home just as UK banks have been supported here.

This NS&I issue has been around since last summer & may well represent a good deal. All the printing of money that has happened in the last few months should lead to increased inflation sooner or later but it is also likely to lead to higher interest rates!!!

I guess the truth is that most savers don't know where to put their money at the moment. This is daft really as it is those who spent mnoney that they didn't have that fuelled the problem and now they are being helped with low interest rates at the expense of savers.
#5
Valhalla1
And of course it was fuelled by the PM tampering with VAT. Now this is no longer an issue inflation could easily fall.


King believes inflation will rise to well over three per cent.
He said: “The patience of UK households is likely to be sorely tried over the next couple of years.
“There is little scope for growth in real take-home pay, which may remain weak even as output recovers. It is clear that inflation is likely to pick up markedly in the first half of this year. The full impact of the financial crisis has yet to be seen.”
He also criticised the government’s plans to reduce the budget deficit as too unambitious, saying swifter action is required. The budget deficit stands at £178bn and Darling has pledged to halve this by 2014.
The comments will be seen as a slap in the face for Labour, whose election campaign hinges on its commitment to improving the UK economy. Figures expected next week will confirm Britain has emerged from the recession.
The Conservatives last night seized on the speech, reiterating their pledge to cut spending quicker than Labour.



pedroman
Puting money into this is lending money to a bankrupt country.


As opposed to lending it to banks (most of which are owned by the UK government in some way or another!)?!

NobbyB
> Novemeber to December saw the biggest jump in inflation since RECORDS BEGAN.

How do you define jump? In real terms or percentage of percentage terms?

2 % inflation to 3% is either a jump of 1%, or a 50% jump: (3-2)/2 x 100
1% inflation to 2% is either a jump of 1%, or 100% jump: (2-1)/1x 100
0% inflation to 1% is either a jump of 1%, or an infinite jump: (1-0)/0 x 100


RPI jumped from -0.3 to 2.4%

The Best 1 year ISA fixes are paying around 3.2%, and are no hedge against inflation!



Ignore the warning signs are your peril :thumbsup:
#6
Chris52
Ummmm. If the country is bankrupt then where do you consider a safe haven for your money? Remember that in shares/ corporate bonds for everyone who thinks today is a good day to buy there is someone else who thinks that it is a good day to sell & many overseas banks have been supported at home just as UK banks have been supported here.

This NS&I issue has been around since last summer & may well represent a good deal. All the printing of money that has happened in the last few months should lead to increased inflation sooner or later but it is also likely to lead to higher interest rates!!!

I guess the truth is that most savers don't know where to put their money at the moment. This is daft really as it is those who spent mnoney that they didn't have that fuelled the problem and now they are being helped with low interest rates at the expense of savers.



Somebody with a bit of sense at last.

Printing money = an inflationary measure.

Low interest rates are the ONLY thing keeping the economy going at the moment, and will not rise IMO.
#7
To answer the above, at the start of last year I bought 575 grams of scrap gold off ebay, put it by....and last week sold it all at 28.7% increase.
#8
pedroman
To answer the above, at the start of last year I bought 575 grams of scrap gold off ebay, put it by....and last week sold it all at 28.7% increase.


Nice one, I had a tenner on a 10-1 at Ffos Las the other week, came in first and bagged me a fair bit.

But seriously, these certs are hardly a comparable form of investment as your capital is guaranteed to beat price inflation.

The price of gold is linked to market value, and therefore its value can go down as well as up. Your capital is not guaranteed.

Gold has its place in any portfolio, but it is at all time highs = not the time to invest.

If you think the Western world will go bankrupt I suggest you buy a gun and plenty of ammunition.
#9
Gold has been shown to have kept pace with inflation for almost 500 years. But that said it is not for most people. I have been involved with it for 25 years. I work on "Hunches" again not for most people. I bought a few grands worth of Euro's at 1.47 last year. That gave me a better return than gold. My hunches for this year are different to what has been said in this thread, but its not prudent to get into discussions of my own "Speculation" even though I have not had a wrong punt in 25 years...this year has a lot of unusual variables coming together in the spring so for the first time I could go wrong.......but one thing I am sure is I am not going to put anything in banks or the government.
banned#10
pedroman
Gold has been shown to have kept pace with inflation for almost 500 years. But that said it is not for most people. I have been involved with it for 25 years. I work on "Hunches" again not for most people. I bought a few grands worth of Euro's at 1.47 last year. That gave me a better return than gold. My hunches for this year are different to what has been said in this thread, but its not prudent to get into discussions of my own "Speculation" even though I have not had a wrong punt in 25 years...this year has a lot of unusual variables coming together in the spring so for the first time I could go wrong.......but one thing I am sure is I am not going to put anything in banks or the government.


We sold a flat in portugal last year and decided to keep the money in the portuguese bank account. Thank God.
#11
NobbyB
We sold a flat in portugal last year and decided to keep the money in the portuguese bank account. Thank God.


Yes..a very good move. Give a lot of thought to this year for the euro. Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Greece and Spain are already starting to pull the Euro down.
#12
When I got my money back after the collapse of Icesave at the end of 2008, I split it between one of these NS&I Index Linked bonds (as a hedge against inflation, and even a reasonable hedge against deflation as it always pays at least 1% tax-free, even if RPI < 0%) and the rest paying back my fixed-rate mortgage (as a hedge against deflation - which would make the outstanding mortgage on my current home look high compared with the price of the next step on the property ladder).

Since 2008, and despite RPI being negative for much of 2009, it still earnt 1.69% tax-free. If you're already as paid-up as you want to be in ISAs or your pension, then this is a reasonable place for surplus, I reckon.
#13
ses6jwg
King believes inflation will rise to well over three per cent.
He said: “The patience of UK households is likely to be sorely tried over the next couple of years.
“There is little scope for growth in real take-home pay, which may remain weak even as output recovers. It is clear that inflation is likely to pick up markedly in the first half of this year. The full impact of the financial crisis has yet to be seen.”
He also criticised the government’s plans to reduce the budget deficit as too unambitious, saying swifter action is required. The budget deficit stands at £178bn and Darling has pledged to halve this by 2014.
The comments will be seen as a slap in the face for Labour, whose election campaign hinges on its commitment to improving the UK economy. Figures expected next week will confirm Britain has emerged from the recession.
The Conservatives last night seized on the speech, reiterating their pledge to cut spending quicker than Labour.





As opposed to lending it to banks (most of which are owned by the UK government in some way or another!)?!



RPI jumped from -0.3 to 2.4%

The Best 1 year ISA fixes are paying around 3.2%, and are no hedge against inflation!



Ignore the warning signs are your peril :thumbsup:



Inflation actually rose from 1.9% to 2.9% - not as stated above.
#14
Valhalla1
Inflation actually rose from 1.9% to 2.9% - not as stated above.


thats CPI,

IL bonds are RPI

up from 0.3 to 2.4
#15
roll up, roll up, get your inflation linked bonds whilst you still can!
1 Like #16
I actually think this is a really hot deal - the rate will always be 1% above RPI. You simply cannot say this about any of the fixed rate deals - if and when the bank rate shoots up following anticipated massive increases in inflation those fixed rate deals from building societies which look so good now will look very much less than healthy, particularly as you will be tied in for the duration of the fixed rate. Buying into this you get a guaranteed rate which will always be above RPI. Invest and relax - that sounds good to me. Just wish I had the money to invest!
#17
Oh look I was right.

Everyone who voted this cold, you are stupid



Mervyn King, the governor of the Bank of England, was forced to write an explanatory letter to the chancellor today, after official figures showed that inflation shot up to 3.5% last month - well above the government's 2% target.

The average instant access savings account pays just 0.86pc before tax, according to Defaqto, the research group, meaning that the interest is insufficient to keep pace with the rise in the cost of living. In other words, the value of the savings in "real" terms will fall even when interest is added.

Most savers pay tax on the interest, which means the real value of their money falls even more drastically. With inflation at 3.7pc, a basic-rate taxpayer would need an account paying 4.63pc just to preserve the real value of his or her savings, Defaqto said. A higher-rate taxpayer would need to earn 6.17pc.

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