nsandi Deals & Sales for 2016 - HotUKDeals
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nsandi Deals & Discounts

2
329Expired

NS&I Guaranteed Growth Bonds now released - 2.8% and 4% p.a. Over 65s only.

74
NS&I have now released these limited issue bonds for over-65s. Fantastic deal if you qualify - 2.8% p.a. on the 1-year bond, and 4% p.a. on the 3-year bond. The interest is taxable. The website seems
jj5678 Avatar1y, 10m agoFound 1 year, 10 months ago74 Comments
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Good price heat added!
Inactive


Agreed, they are just " Headline Grabbers " ... 6% sounds very good until you take time to work out how little return they actually pay.

Hmmm, You definitely have no idea what some people who have a lot of cash are doing. People are not that stupid as you might think.

People are feeding several high interest Regular savers from high interest current account such as Santander123, Club Lloyds current account, etc which currently pays around 3-4%.

By doing this, the people are slowly moving interest from 3% to 6%. This trick is often called dripfeeding. When it is mature., put it back in the high interest current account and repeat the same dripfeeding process again





Edited By: pantaiema on Jan 17, 2015 00:58
taxi for thomas25
thomas25
20% if your over 100 and a free parker pen

You're waaaaaaaaaaay too late. That joke was pretty much done and dusted on page 1 .... :|

Comedy. It's all in the timing ....

Edited By: sancheez on Jan 16, 2015 14:31
20% if your over 100 and a free parker pen
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7Expired

NS&I Children's bond on sale @ 2.5% AER

5
As it says in the subject and more info on the NS&I Website. Basically it's 2.5% tax free interest (for both parent and child) for 5 years fixed term with minimum of GBP 25.00 and max GBP 3,000.0…
rathod Avatar4y, 2m agoFound 4 years, 2 months ago5 Comments
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LongPockets

I remember buying a pint of beer in a pub for two shillings, just before decimalisation. That's the equivalent of ten pence today, and that is how much government has robbed from savings over that period (though for much of it interest rates were high enough to keep pace). How much does beer cost in a pub today? I no longer buy it, but whatever it costs, that sum is worth what ten pence would have been worth in the sixties.

Not quite as different goods and services experience different rates of inflation; technology actually usually experiences deflation, whilst labour-intensive goods and services often experience inflation rates higher than the average. With that in mind, I'd expect artisan beers to have experienced higher-than-average inflation, whilst bog-standard mass-produced beers are probably about on the average, and may have experienced periods of deflation as brewing production became more efficient due to improvements in technology and automation.
If you think the government isn't robbing you of the principle in your savings then you just don't understand what's going on. Not only are they taking the value from your savings (without changing the number of pounds) they are doing it deliberately. Whenever governments get into debt, they inflate it away, paying debts back in paper worth half or a quarter of the value it was worth when they borrowed. At the moment, they are actively holding down interest rates too, so that savings can't keep up with inflation.

I remember buying a pint of beer in a pub for two shillings, just before decimalisation. That's the equivalent of ten pence today, and that is how much government has robbed from savings over that period (though for much of it interest rates were high enough to keep pace). How much does beer cost in a pub today? I no longer buy it, but whatever it costs, that sum is worth what ten pence would have been worth in the sixties.

Edited By: LongPockets on Sep 20, 2012 18:47
Guys this is Children's bond. You are effectively giving away money to your child (reducing inheritance tax) and the interest they earn is tax free as well (otherwise you have a GBP 100.00 per annum limit for interest earned on Children's saving accounts).

I understand this is no where near leading interest rates you get even on a one year fixed rate bond, but this is totally different investment - you are putting away money for your child without the tax man taking any penny from your principle or interest.
Larrythelimpet
Inflation could easily exceed 2.5% over the time period and degrade the purchasing power of your capital. Might be better to go for an index-linked bond.

Yes, in fact inflation is probably really already more than 2.5%. Government figures are always massaged. I put money into equities rather than anything with an interest rate. You can get pretty reliable 5% dividend yield and still hope for a capital gain (the first £10,000 or so of which can be tax free each year if you realise the gain, i.e. sell). You can put over £11,000 into a shares ISA each year to get a tax-free investment (except for 10% deducted at source on dividends).

Edited By: LongPockets on Sep 20, 2012 16:35
Inflation could easily exceed 2.5% over the time period and degrade the purchasing power of your capital. Might be better to go for an index-linked bond.
-5Expired

NS&I Index-Linked Savings Certificates

17
Don't let the government steal your savings with their engineered inflation! Inflation = less public debt but also less from your savings! Novemeber to December saw the biggest jump in inflation…
ses6jwg Avatar6y, 10m agoFound 6 years, 10 months ago17 Comments
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Oh look I was right.

Everyone who voted this cold, you are stupid



Mervyn King, the governor of the Bank of England, was forced to write an explanatory letter to the chancellor today, after official figures showed that inflation shot up to 3.5% last month - well above the government's 2% target.

The average instant access savings account pays just 0.86pc before tax, according to Defaqto, the research group, meaning that the interest is insufficient to keep pace with the rise in the cost of living. In other words, the value of the savings in "real" terms will fall even when interest is added.

Most savers pay tax on the interest, which means the real value of their money falls even more drastically. With inflation at 3.7pc, a basic-rate taxpayer would need an account paying 4.63pc just to preserve the real value of his or her savings, Defaqto said. A higher-rate taxpayer would need to earn 6.17pc.
I actually think this is a really hot deal - the rate will always be 1% above RPI. You simply cannot say this about any of the fixed rate deals - if and when the bank rate shoots up following anticipated massive increases in inflation those fixed rate deals from building societies which look so good now will look very much less than healthy, particularly as you will be tied in for the duration of the fixed rate. Buying into this you get a guaranteed rate which will always be above RPI. Invest and relax - that sounds good to me. Just wish I had the money to invest!
roll up, roll up, get your inflation linked bonds whilst you still can!
Valhalla1;7615209
Inflation actually rose from 1.9% to 2.9% - not as stated above.


thats CPI,

IL bonds are RPI

up from 0.3 to 2.4
ses6jwg;7603247
King believes inflation will rise to well over three per cent.
He said: “The patience of UK households is likely to be sorely tried over the next couple of years.
“There is little scope for growth in real take-home pay, which may remain weak even as output recovers. It is clear that inflation is likely to pick up markedly in the first half of this year. The full impact of the financial crisis has yet to be seen.”
He also criticised the government’s plans to reduce the budget deficit as too unambitious, saying swifter action is required. The budget deficit stands at £178bn and Darling has pledged to halve this by 2014.
The comments will be seen as a slap in the face for Labour, whose election campaign hinges on its commitment to improving the UK economy. Figures expected next week will confirm Britain has emerged from the recession.
The Conservatives last night seized on the speech, reiterating their pledge to cut spending quicker than Labour.





As opposed to lending it to banks (most of which are owned by the UK government in some way or another!)?!



RPI jumped from -0.3 to 2.4%

The Best 1 year ISA fixes are paying around 3.2%, and are no hedge against inflation!



Ignore the warning signs are your peril :thumbsup:



Inflation actually rose from 1.9% to 2.9% - not as stated above.
329Expired

NS&I Guaranteed Growth Bonds - 3.95% pa GROSS (1yr Fixed)

38
Seems like a good deal for 1yr fixed rate. Capital is 100% guaranteed as backed by goverment. Guaranteed Growth Bonds Grow your money at guaranteed rates NS&I Guaranteed Growth Bonds give you a
Guzumper Avatar7y, 1m agoFound 7 years, 1 month ago38 Comments
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My husband will be 65 in April, will these bonds still be available to buy.
Now withdrawn 3 or 5 year bonds still avaliable.
csiman;6874828
actually its a 3 year fix but withdrawals are permitted with 90 days loss of interest. Simple math will tell you 5.2% = 3.9% if you withdraw all your investment after 1 year. Therefore, 3 year fix at 5.2% is much better as long as you invest for longer than 1 year :thumbsup:


maybe, but not if the 2 year interest rate is higher in one year when this one matures. In two years time having your money fixed at 5.2% gross may not seem such a good idea......
ses6jwg;6826428
... Which is probably fixed for 5 years as opposed to the NS&I which is fixed for 1

Not a good move as interest rates won't be going any lower.

actually its a 3 year fix but withdrawals are permitted with 90 days loss of interest. Simple math will tell you 5.2% = 3.9% if you withdraw all your investment after 1 year. Therefore, 3 year fix at 5.2% is much better as long as you invest for longer than 1 year :thumbsup:
Anyone applied by post? can you plse confirm address to send cheque to? The one the form says Glasgow but online address for comms for this prod is in Durham. thanks.
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