OCZ 120GB Solid 3 SATA-III 6Gbps SSD £54.99 Delivered @ Ebuyer - HotUKDeals
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- 2.5" SATA-III SSD
- Read 500MB/s
- Write 450MB/s
- Random Write 4KB: 20,000 IOPS
- 3 Year Warranty

FREE Delivery if you choose their standard 5 day delivery service. 490 in stock at time of writing

Performance

Max Read - up to 500 MB/s (SATA-III 6Gbps), up to 280 MB/s (SATA-II 3Gbps)
Max Write - up to 450 MB/s (SATA-III 6Gbps), up to 260 MB/s (SATA-II 3Gbps)
4KB Random Read - 20,000 IOPS (75 MB/s)
4KB Random Write - 20,000 IOPS (75 MB/s)
Sequential Read AS-SSD - 185 MB/s
Sequential Write AS-SSD - 125 MB/s
4K Random Read AS-SSD - 23,000 (90 MB/s)
4K Random Write AS-SSD - 33,000 (130 MB/s)

SPECIFICATIONS
NAND Components - Multi-Level Cell (MLC)
Interface - SATA-III/6Gbps (Backwards compatible with SATA-II/3Gbps, but optimized for SATA-111 6Gbps)
Form Factor - 2.5 Inch
Controller - SandForce 2281
Dimensions (L x W x H) - 99.8 x 69.63 x 9.3 mm
Seek Time - 0.1 ms
Weight - 77g
Power Consumption - Idle: 1.5 Watts, Active: 2.7 Watts
Operating Temperature - 0°C ~ 55°C
Storage Temperature - -45°C ~ 85°C
Shock Resistance - 1500G
Certifications - RoHS, CE, FCC
MTBF - 2 million hours
ECC Recovery - Up to 55 bits correctable per 512-byte sector (BCH) *varies depending on exact configuration
Product Health Monitoring - Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology (S.M.A.R.T.)
Serial ATA (SATA) - Fully compliant with Serial ATA International Organization: Serial ATA Revision 3.0. Fully compliant with ATA/ATAPI-8 Standard Native Command Queuing (NCQ)
Operating System - Windows XP 32-Bit and 64-Bit; Windows Vista 32-Bit and 64-Bit; Windows 7 32-Bit and 64-Bit; Mac OS X; Linux
Power Requirements - Standard SATA Power Connector
Performance Optimization - TRIM (requires OS support)
Service & Support - 3-Year Warranty, Toll-Free Tech Support, 24 Hour Forum Support, Firmware Updates
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Cousteau2012 Avatar
4y, 2w agoFound 4 years, 2 weeks ago
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Comments/page:
#1
what's reliability like on this SSD ?
#2
Mrman123
what's reliability like on this SSD ?

no idea but you at least get a 3 year warranty :)
#3
I just take it as read that it's an OCZ so for goodness sake back up your critical data from it, on to a Samsung or a Crucial! Or even, with grudging fairness, onto the reportedly more reliable new OCZ 4 series.

Typically thorough review over at storeagereview. In short, they say: "Performance is limited compared to the (old) Agility 3 or Vertex 3, but in our real-world traces it still only trailed by 6.5-19.5% depending on the situation." They concluded hot at that price but I would be tempted to wait a few weeks and see how Samsung and Corsair respond.

http://www.storagereview.com/ocz_solid_3_review_120gb
2 Likes #4
Wouldn't use it for mission critical data, perhaps, but a hot from me. Nice find, Cousteau2012.
#5
Would this be good for the operating system on a HP Proliant N40L?
#6
What's with the OCZ hate in the last week? They make decent drives.

If you buy their cheap products, then you only have yourself to blame!
6 Likes #7
daver77
Would this be good for the operating system on a HP Proliant N40L?
Depending on what you're doing, almost any SSD of 64GB will do. W7 x64 needs 20GB + pagefile + hibernation file if using one. Leave 20% free space and even a 64GB drive will still leave you 20GB+ for apps. You won't need stunning SSD speeds if you're just using it as a HTPC file server for instance.

Freespace for SSD's
64GB drive = 59.6GB (after windows formatting) = 47.68GB actual usable space (after 20% free space rule)
120GB drive = 111.75GB (after windows formatting) = 89.4GB actual usable space (after 20% free space rule)
128GB drive = 119.2GB (after windows formatting) = 95.36GB actual usable space (after 20% free space rule)
160GB drive = 149GB (after windows formatting) = 119.2GB actual usable space (after 20% free space rule)
Source: Overclock.net

Approximate Windows 7 installation sizes (excluding pagefile & hibernation file):
32bit - 16GB
64bit - 20GB

Edited By: repouk on Sep 13, 2012 12:34
1 Like #8
Might get one of these for an Elitebook 6930p - I assume that this will be a viable solution?
4 Likes #9
tehwabbit
What's with the OCZ hate in the last week? They make decent drives.

If you buy their cheap products, then you only have yourself to blame!

Well, no. If they sell crappy products which fail then maybe they deserve some criticism? It's not as if their budget drives come with a "likely to fail and take all your data with it" warning. A slow drive is what you sell cheap, a failure-prone drive is something you don't sell at all unless you are a bloody terrible company.

EDIT: And for the record, I've had to RMA like 5 fancy OCZ flash drives, about 4 sticks of RAM, and most recently an SSD. I think this last incident will finally keep me away from them for good.

Edited By: CannedChaos on Sep 13, 2012 12:54: added complaining
2 Likes #10
martinelsen
Might get one of these for an Elitebook 6930p - I assume that this will be a viable solution?

Don't see why not plus if you need additional disk storage you can either opt for an external USB HDD or look into purchasing a 2nd HDD Caddy, to replace the Optical Drive in your laptop. :D
#11
Really good price for 120gb version, sata 3,great read/write speeds and 3 year warranty. I would certainly buy one if i have second computer/laptop. :)
Noclouds->Please dont wait for Samsung 830 to respond lol. Its a higher quality product and very reliable indeed.
I doubt you will see any big price change unless if its a market trend but not because of OCZ.
#12
CannedChaos
tehwabbit
What's with the OCZ hate in the last week? They make decent drives.

If you buy their cheap products, then you only have yourself to blame!

Well, no. If they sell crappy products which fail then maybe they deserve some criticism? It's not as if their budget drives come with a "likely to fail and take all your data with it" warning. A slow drive is what you sell cheap, a failure-prone drive is something you don't sell at all unless you are a bloody terrible company.

EDIT: And for the record, I've had to RMA like 5 fancy OCZ flash drives, about 4 sticks of RAM, and most recently an SSD. I think this last incident will finally keep me away from them for good.

Pretty much all big companies sell dodgy/low-end products -usually they are white labels though so you can't tell who makes them!


I've had to RMA a few things in the last 12 months too including some high-end Crucial DDR3 which get amazing reviews. I just put it down to bad luck, they can't test everything :)

I wouldn't knock a company just because I have had bad experience with them, perhaps if you have had 5 of the same drive in the same machine it is something else that is causing an issue - My RAM issue was due to a voltage problem on the Mobo.
3 Likes #13
"Controller - SandForce 2281"

+

Manufacturer "OCZ"

= Ticking time bomb.

No offence to the op but never, ever again.
(3 SSD OCZ failures on)


Edited By: dangel on Sep 13, 2012 14:01
#14
Again, having had BSOD issues with an OCZ and Corsair SATA3 SSD drives using the same Sandforce controller, I wouldn't go near them.

I now have a Samsung 830 in my Vaio and a Crucial M4 in my Gaming rig and both have been faultless
#15
lol remember the OCZ core drive I got for 120gb £369.99 when SSD first came mainstream and it made windows awful to use compared to a normal harddrive as they messed up the memory controller compared to the first intel drives. The next one I got was OCZ Agility 3 60gb for £75 which is currently occasionally dissapearing from the bios on boot. I have 2x256GB samsung 830 series SSDs in raid 0 as my games drive and they are faultless but the OCZ drives I've decided I'm not buying another.
#16
daver77
Would this be good for the operating system on a HP Proliant N40L?

It's a 2.5" sata drive so only issue is where you put it - possible velcro to attach it inside case.
#17
I too have had a OCZ SSD be flaky and fail. Bought a new Samsung 830 SSD and it has been fine.

Read some PC enthusiast forums, the advice is usually to steer clear of OCZ who often use poor components and have bad warranty policy. I wouldn't buy this brand again.
2 Likes #18
Do not buy. Only 20,000 IOPS and if you pay around £15 more you can get the same size with about 80,000 IOPS.
#19
I wouldn't buy this, I have a failed OCZ SSD, which broke after about 12-15 months of use. My local pc shop said that they've experienced a few failures as well, in about a year. It's very unusual for SSD's to fail so easily, OCZ must be using budget parts for their drives.

If u buy this and it fails, then you will lose all of your data. All of it!
#20
Before buying this SSD, I recommend checking out some of the reviews that some buyers left on newegg

you dont even need to read through all 14 pages of user/buyer reviews to see that the main issue that stands out that drives are either DoA or fail within a very very short period of time.

they might give you a 3year warranty with it but whats the point when the SSD is going to spend more time with the manufacturer then being used in your laptop or PC like you bought it for??? Ebuyer will send you out a new SSD if the drive fails while under shop warranty. But OCZ will send you back a SSD that has already failed and been through the repair process which means you automatically run the gauntlet again or sit there biting your nails wondering when its going to go kaput again.

OCZ arent ALL bad, Ive used OCZ SSDs in the past and most of them have lived long enough to be sold on and are still working perfectly with their new owners.

given Intel, Samsung or Crucial's reliability when it comes to SSDs, I have to vote this deal COLD.
#21
just remember for every bad review left there are a couple of hundred more out there with no problems. it's more likely for someone to leave a comment/review about something if it goes wrong. there are bound to be a percentage of faulty items off a manufacturer's product line, some more than others but whats more important is how they handle the rma and from what i've gathered so far ocz seems to be pretty good with that.

Edited By: 2k56 on Sep 13, 2012 20:43
#22
you reckon this is better than the previous kingston v200 deal?
1 Like #23
people need to factor in rma. if it fails you need to rma at your own cost to ocz at some european address, same as Samsung as well, but which one is likely to fail?.

Customer is responsible for shipping charges TO our facility only. OCZ splits the cost with paid RETURN shipping.

taken from http://forums.overclockers.co.uk/showthread.php?t=18394629

Looks like Kingston is UK >>http://www.kingston.com/en/company/warranty
Quote: Originally Posted by Kingston
In Europe, if you are unable to return the product to the authorised Kingston dealer or distributor from whom you purchased the product, you may return the product directly to the Kingston service centre at: Kingston Court, Brooklands Close, Sunbury on Thames, Middlesex, TW16 7EP, UK. Before returning the product, you must first obtain a Return Material Authorization ("RMA") number from Kingston. An RMA number is obtained by contacting European Technical Support via Kingston's website: http://www.kingston.com/en/support. Conditions and freight requirements are as with U.S. RMA returns as shown above.

Also Crucial is in the UK >>http://www.crucial.com/uk/support/returns.aspx
Quote: Originally Posted by Crucial
Returns Address: Lexar Media, 12 Redwood Crescent, Peel Park Campus, East Kilbride, G74 5PA

Intel RMA has a UK Contact Number: >>http://www.intel.com/p/en_US/support/contact/phone
Quote: Originally Posted by Intel
I have already spoke to Intel - UK about this - Within first 30 days the retailer will deal with this, after that you can ring 0870 607 2439, Intel UK will then raise an RMA and arrange pickup via DHL, the SSD then goes to Holland and a replacement is issued from there, all free of charge.

Samsung looks like it is Holland >>http://www.samsung.com/uk/support/warranty/Support_warranty_SSD.html
Quote: Originally Posted by Samsung
Address: 5751 PC, Florijn 8, Deurne, Netherlands Email: [email protected]

OCZ is Holland >>http://www.ocztechnology.com/contact/
Quote: Originally Posted by OCZ
Europe Tech Support: Monday to Friday 8am-5pm GMT
Based in our NL office. Technical Support, RMA setup, troubleshooting, and pre-purchase product information for end-users based in Europe.
You can also visit our multi-lingual support forums for pre-RMA troubleshooting or product information. http://www.ocztechnology.com/NewTicket.html

Corsair is Holland >>http://www.corsair.com/support/technicalsupport/



Edited By: csf on Sep 13, 2012 22:07: .
#24
baroni1971
daver77
Would this be good for the operating system on a HP Proliant N40L?

It's a 2.5" sata drive so only issue is where you put it - possible velcro to attach it inside case.

you can buy a fixing kit from most PC stockists, that allows you to fit a 2.5" drive into a 3.5" drive bay
#25
Noclouds
I just take it as read that it's an OCZ so for goodness sake back up your critical data from it, on to a Samsung or a Crucial! Or even, with grudging fairness, onto the reportedly more reliable new OCZ 4 series.


That made me laugh so much i almost choked on my cup of tea.
Yes - Backup onto a Samsung drive. That way you will guarantee to loose all your data.


I have a Sandisk SSD coupled with a 2TB Western Digital Caviar Black in my rig. Information on both drives is "disposable" e.g i can format it and it wouldnt matter in the slightest. Anything i need to keep and not loose gets put onto 2x Seagate Drives in my HP-Microserver over ethernet.

So tbh i dont care if my SSD fails (other than the fact i'd have to buy another one) since i can re-install windows and have all the files i need stored on the Microserver, and can therefore copy back accross the files that were on my PC before from the Microserver.
#26
118luke
Noclouds
I just take it as read that it's an OCZ so for goodness sake back up your critical data from it, on to a Samsung or a Crucial! Or even, with grudging fairness, onto the reportedly more reliable new OCZ 4 series.


That made me laugh so much i almost choked on my cup of tea.
Yes - Backup onto a Samsung drive. That way you will guarantee to loose all your data.


I have a Sandisk SSD coupled with a 2TB Western Digital Caviar Black in my rig. Information on both drives is "disposable" e.g i can format it and it wouldnt matter in the slightest. Anything i need to keep and not loose gets put onto 2x Seagate Drives in my HP-Microserver over ethernet.

So tbh i dont care if my SSD fails (other than the fact i'd have to buy another one) since i can re-install windows and have all the files i need stored on the Microserver, and can therefore copy back accross the files that were on my PC before from the Microserver.

Samsung are widely regarded as being top-tier reliability for their SSDs, and you don't gain any kudos for describing your 1337 server storage system - it impresses no one. In fact, if you were serious about your data you probably wouldn't be backing them up to seagate drives, as they continually come out towards the lower end of the reliability spectrum.
#27
everything I own is better than yours 118luke so you failed!
#28
tehwabbit
What's with the OCZ hate in the last week? They make decent drives.

If you buy their cheap products, then you only have yourself to blame!

90% of their SSD's have shocking fail rates
#29
2k56
just remember for every bad review left there are a couple of hundred more out there with no problems. it's more likely for someone to leave a comment/review about something if it goes wrong. there are bound to be a percentage of faulty items off a manufacturer's product line, some more than others but whats more important is how they handle the rma and from what i've gathered so far ocz seems to be pretty good with that.

Actually that's not true, if you do some research instead of making assumptions you'd find that the return rates for OCZ drives are awful:

SSD Return Rates

This site has been releasing data on this for a while and OCZ have been getting worse and worse for a couple of years. OCZ is now at an overall 7% return rate with their worst drive (OCZ Vertex 2 Series 240 GB) at a staggering 15%. These are not the experiences of a few disgruntled HUKD members, it is a widespread problem.

[Having said that I do actually own 3 OCZ drives and have had no problems myself so far! :-) ]


Edited By: weltysparrow on Sep 14, 2012 13:17
#30
weltysparrow
2k56
just remember for every bad review left there are a couple of hundred more out there with no problems. it's more likely for someone to leave a comment/review about something if it goes wrong. there are bound to be a percentage of faulty items off a manufacturer's product line, some more than others but whats more important is how they handle the rma and from what i've gathered so far ocz seems to be pretty good with that.

Actually that's not true, if you do some research instead of making assumptions you'd find that the return rates for OCZ drives are awful:

SSD Return Rates

This site has been releasing data on this for a while and OCZ have been getting worse and worse for a couple of years. OCZ is now at an overall 7% return rate with their worst drive (OCZ Vertex 2 Series 240 GB) at a staggering 15%. These are not the experiences of a few disgruntled HUKD members, it is a widespread problem.

[Having said that I do actually own 3 OCZ drives and have had no problems myself so far! :-) ]


i don't think i denied the fact that ocz drives have a high fault rate in my previous post.
#31
thekanester
118luke
Noclouds
I just take it as read that it's an OCZ so for goodness sake back up your critical data from it, on to a Samsung or a Crucial! Or even, with grudging fairness, onto the reportedly more reliable new OCZ 4 series.


That made me laugh so much i almost choked on my cup of tea.
Yes - Backup onto a Samsung drive. That way you will guarantee to loose all your data.


I have a Sandisk SSD coupled with a 2TB Western Digital Caviar Black in my rig. Information on both drives is "disposable" e.g i can format it and it wouldnt matter in the slightest. Anything i need to keep and not loose gets put onto 2x Seagate Drives in my HP-Microserver over ethernet.

So tbh i dont care if my SSD fails (other than the fact i'd have to buy another one) since i can re-install windows and have all the files i need stored on the Microserver, and can therefore copy back accross the files that were on my PC before from the Microserver.

Samsung are widely regarded as being top-tier reliability for their SSDs, and you don't gain any kudos for describing your 1337 server storage system - it impresses no one. In fact, if you were serious about your data you probably wouldn't be backing them up to seagate drives, as they continually come out towards the lower end of the reliability spectrum.

Im afraid my personal experience differs wildly from reviews. As i've stated previously, had nothing but trouble with Samsung PC components in the past. Ram, DVD-Rom Drives, Hard Drives all failed catastrophically. So wont touch Samsung Pc products again. Period.
Seagate on the other hand ive never had a single problem, and have been without a doubt the most reliable drives i've owned - drives have faced lots of reformats and reinstalls and Continuous running. But of course, this is just my say so.

everything I own is better than yours 118luke so you failed!

...and your point is? Mine was to point out if you distribute your important files correctly and store them onto dedicated storage there is far less likelihood of failure. I never stated that i have the best setup, on the contrary - i want to get an external 2TB drive at some point as an extra backup for all my photos etc. But with prices still stupidly high at present im not bothering.
banned#32
this SSD can be used upgrade my macbook pro 2011 harddisk?
compatible?
#33
fail rates

Crucial 0.82% (against 0.8%)
- Intel 1.73% (against 0.1%)
- Corsair 2.93% (against 2.9%)
- OCZ 7.03% (against 4.2%)

- 15.58% 2 OCZ Vertex Series 240GB SSD
- 13.28% 2 OCZ Vertex Series 160GB SSD
- 11.76% 2 OCZ Vertex Series SSD 80GB
- 9.52% 2 OCZ Vertex Series 120GB SSD
- 8.57% 3 OCZ Vertex Series 120GB
- 7.49% 2 OCZ Vertex Series SSD 60GB
- 6.61% 2 OCZ Vertex Series 3.5 "SSD 120GB
- 6.37% 3 OCZ Vertex Series 240GB
- 6.37% March 60 GB OCZ Agility
- 5.89% 2 OCZ Vertex Series 100GB SSD

(and:
(brand new drives)

13.46% Series 128 GB OCZ Petrol
5.95% 2 OCZ Vertex Series 3.5 "120 GB
5.85% Octane Series OCZ 128GB SATA II
4.57% 2 OCZ Vertex Series 120GB SSD
3.57% Octane Series OCZ 64GB SATA II)

The conclusion is obvious: Avoid OCZ like the plague.
#34
118luke
thekanester
118luke
Noclouds
I just take it as read that it's an OCZ so for goodness sake back up your critical data from it, on to a Samsung or a Crucial! Or even, with grudging fairness, onto the reportedly more reliable new OCZ 4 series.
That made me laugh so much i almost choked on my cup of tea.Yes - Backup onto a Samsung drive. That way you will guarantee to loose all your data.I have a Sandisk SSD coupled with a 2TB Western Digital Caviar Black in my rig. Information on both drives is "disposable" e.g i can format it and it wouldnt matter in the slightest. Anything i need to keep and not loose gets put onto 2x Seagate Drives in my HP-Microserver over ethernet.So tbh i dont care if my SSD fails (other than the fact i'd have to buy another one) since i can re-install windows and have all the files i need stored on the Microserver, and can therefore copy back accross the files that were on my PC before from the Microserver.
Samsung are widely regarded as being top-tier reliability for their SSDs, and you don't gain any kudos for describing your 1337 server storage system - it impresses no one. In fact, if you were serious about your data you probably wouldn't be backing them up to seagate drives, as they continually come out towards the lower end of the reliability spectrum.
Im afraid my personal experience differs wildly from reviews. As i've stated previously, had nothing but trouble with Samsung PC components in the past. Ram, DVD-Rom Drives, Hard Drives all failed catastrophically. So wont touch Samsung Pc products again. Period.Seagate on the other hand ive never had a single problem, and have been without a doubt the most reliable drives i've owned - drives have faced lots of reformats and reinstalls and Continuous running. But of course, this is just my say so.
everything I own is better than yours 118luke so you failed!
...and your point is? Mine was to point out if you distribute your important files correctly and store them onto dedicated storage there is far less likelihood of failure. I never stated that i have the best setup, on the contrary - i want to get an external 2TB drive at some point as an extra backup for all my photos etc. But with prices still stupidly high at present im not bothering.

So, basically you have no experience with a samsung ssd? His point still stands. You might want to look into who makes samsung hdds thesedays btw ;)

Edited By: dangel on Sep 16, 2012 04:47: Ipad keyboard sucks

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