Optoma HD600X 720P HD Ready Home Cinema Projector with FREE 84" screen £449.99 delivered @ PLAY - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit
Bargain - esp with the free screen!
The HD600X home cinema projector delivers the kind of picture quality associated with the best digital cinema performance around the world. With a digital HDMI signal you can create a true digital projection system that produces a spectacular HD cinematic experience in your own home. A masterly collaboration of HD Ready DLP technology from Texas Instruments and Optoma craftsmanship produces a stunningly bright image with perfectly balanced vivid colour, crystal clarity and the exceptional light and shade detail only possible with a high ANSI contrast projector.

ANSI Contrast is a way of measuring the true 'real world' contrast performance you can expect from a projector in your own home. This measurement technique includes a reproducible procedure that can be used to compare the performance of projectors using different display technologies. With an ANSI contrast ratio significantly higher than many LCD based projectors, the HD600X is the only choice for Home Cinema 'purists' that expect ultimate image fidelity in their home.
More From Play.Com:
×
Get the Hottest Deals Daily
Stay informed. Once a day, we'll send you the deals our members voted as the best.
Failed
amibees Avatar
6y, 1m agoFound 6 years, 1 month ago
Options

All Comments

(35) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
Sounds good. Is the screen pull down after you mount it?
#2
Surely you'd need 1080p for something of this size??

Edited By: swampy_donkey on Nov 05, 2010 07:53: lolage
#3
Quite a small screen, you will find fatigue setting in fast and you will have a real wanting for a larger screen. I use a 120" screen which is perfect for my needs but would recommend at least 92" for your average user. Also, be warned that this projector, like it's predecessor, suffers from the dreaded 'rainbow effect' even though this model has a 4 speed colour wheel.

If you can, get a demo first to see if you are sensitive to the above issue.
#4

Quite a small screen, you will find fatigue setting in fast and you will have a real wanting for a larger screen. I use a 120" screen which is perfect for my needs but would recommend at least 92" for your average user. Also, be warned that this projector, like it's predecessor, suffers from the dreaded 'rainbow effect' even though this model has a 4 speed colour wheel.

If you can, get a demo first to see if you are sensitive to the above issue.



totally agree with norse !



i have one bought one of this last year, best buy ever and the result is phenomenal, especially for blu-ray and xbox 360...but one more thing needs pointing out about this product as there is no audio output ... so you have to extract the sound from the source .... if anyone needs help with that , can ask me ... !
#5
sheikhoo

but one more thing needs pointing out about this product as there is no audio output ... so you have to extract the sound from the source .... if anyone needs help with that , can ask me ... !

Are you being serious there?

You've hooked up your PJ & 84" screen to your Hi-Def source (Blu-Ray, Console, Satellite, Cable Etc) & are expecting to watch it in Mono with the one & only speaker above & behind you?


Edited By: Nuwidol on Nov 05, 2010 11:27: removed [quote=]
#6
Sounds like a great deal to me, hot!!

Edited By: pc390 on Nov 05, 2010 16:58: Spelling!
suspended#7
How much room would you need from wall to wall to make full use of the 84" screen?
#8
Norse
Quite a small screen, you will find fatigue setting in fast and you will have a real wanting for a larger screen. I use a 120" screen which is perfect for my needs but would recommend at least 92" for your average user. Also, be warned that this projector, like it's predecessor, suffers from the dreaded 'rainbow effect' even though this model has a 4 speed colour wheel.

If you can, get a demo first to see if you are sensitive to the above issue.


I don't think many users will find that a problem tbh 84" is plenty big enough for the vast majority who have 32" sets.

As for a demo well you could do that or just buy it see how you get on then return it under the DSR
1 Like #9
swampy_donkey
Surely you'd need 1080p for something of this size??


I always thought the same as well. But I have been using a BENQ W500 at mostly 720P on a 10 foot diagonal wall screen for the last four years and find it is just fine. The source feed is rarely upto to good 1080P standard most times except for some footie matches. I only ever turn on my 42" plasma to check the TV guide before switching the output over to the projector these days.
1 Like #10
geebet
How much room would you need from wall to wall to make full use of the 84" screen?


Goto..

http://www.projectorcentral.com/projection-calculator-pro.cfm

and put in the prospective projector model and it will tell you the optimum size for screen and distant to screen.
#11
Norse
Quite a small screen, you will find fatigue setting in fast and you will have a real wanting for a larger screen. I use a 120" screen which is perfect for my needs but would recommend at least 92" for your average user. Also, be warned that this projector, like it's predecessor, suffers from the dreaded 'rainbow effect' even though this model has a 4 speed colour wheel.

If you can, get a demo first to see if you are sensitive to the above issue.


I second getting a demo 100%. I am one of those that is very sensitive to the rainbow effect and until I actually saw it in action, I never would have believed it could be that bad. For me it was unwatchable after five minutes.

Edited By: tc80tc80 on Nov 07, 2010 07:34: Speeling
#12
If you want to mount to the wall behind your head, got the _bay and get one of these....

http://****.co.uk/Universal-Projector-Wall-Ceiling-Mount-Bracket-/400138455681?pt=UK_Home_Garden_LivingRoom_TV_Furniture&hash=item5d2a1c4a81

No the prettiest, but extremely adjustable and super strong. In two years, it has not shifted or sagged at all.

Edited By: tc80tc80 on Nov 07, 2010 07:32: speeeling
#13
Good deal, though to be honest would prefer LED one as they last 20,000 - 30,000 hours for the whole unit as opposed to replacing a bulb in these every 3,000-4,000 hours of use.
#14
geebet
How much room would you need from wall to wall to make full use of the 84" screen?


3 Metres.
#15
WelshJester
Good deal, though to be honest would prefer LED one as they last 20,000 - 30,000 hours for the whole unit as opposed to replacing a bulb in these every 3,000-4,000 hours of use.

LED projectors are new on the market and cost WAY more than this (True LED projectors like Vivitek H9080FD at $15,000) hardly a fair comparison. But otherwise LCD/DLP etc. all use lamps so they all have the same sort of life.

HD600x: I have on of these, cracking unit, only 720p but looks fantastic.
#16
Hvae had an LCD 720P Sanyo Z4 for years now, it still amazes me to this day on my 9 foot wide screen.
#17
londonstinks
Hvae had an LCD 720P Sanyo Z4 for years now, it still amazes me to this day on my 9 foot wide screen.


Agreed. Great isn't it! I've got a Panny PTAE 900 (720p) and there really is no better way to watch big movies. Just wish I could afford the PTAE 4000 full HD version (about £1800 at the moment though!). If I has 2k to spend I wouldn't spend it on a big Panny 3D TV that's for sure. Now a panny 3D projector....well, I can dream...

Edited By: hotyoda on Nov 07, 2010 10:23: a
#18
Agreed with regards to the input feed. People were using video projector quite happily long before 1080 was even dreamt about. To be honest, these definition terms are used too easily as the 'be all and end all'; they are not. To give analogy, we have sports cars, luxury sedans, super minis.... those are our resolutions. However, every idiot knows that an mazda mx5 is simply a million miles away from being a porsche 911. The same goes for resolutions. An individual who knows what he is doing will be able to produce a 720p image which will walk all over the 1080p image which Joe Public achieves with his Currys plasma and blurap player. So do not get too hung up on resolutions!!!
#19
I have a 720p Sharp XV-Z3000 DLP PJ (a £2000 model i was lucky to get from Laskys for £600) and even DVD and SDTV look superb on it. 720p is plenty for a pj, especially a DLP one which has a lovely film like effect. Its a world away from big screen TVs and it is fantastic to be able to watch films from the 20s to the 90s just as they were meant to be seen. Not many people get to see the classics in their own cinema for under £500. Hot.
banned 1 Like #20
Some generic info that might help you decide:

720p is fine. Despite the size, you will barely be able to notice (if at all) any difference between 720p and 1080p on a projector due to the technology used.
84" is fine, there is no point going bigger than this unless you have a room where you are sat considerably more than 3M away from the screen. Any bigger will be uncomfortable.
This projector is only 1600 lumins. That is not particularly bright, but will probably be OK in a home where you can block out sunlight. In direct sunlight it will be unwatchable.
Make sure you know the cost of replacement bulbs - expect to replace them every two to three years
You will almost certainly want to ceiling mount this to get it out the way in your average living room, and run cabling down to an AV cabinet. Surround sound is absolutely essential.

IMPORTANT: DRAWBACKS OF DLP (vs LCD/LED)
Increased fan noise - DLP's are noisy compared to the alternatives
Lower image quality - while DLP can provide higher resolutions more cheaply, the image quality is not as good due to various distortions and artifacts that can appear. I think they're called something like the rainbow effect and screen door effect.
Lower lamp life - the bulbs in this will not last very long, and are not cheap to replace. Optima quote this one as having 4000 hours but I would be extremely surprised if it lasted this long as that will not be given for it being used at full brightness. My guess would be 2500 hours at the brightness it would typically be used at which is probably two and a half years use.

I would not use this as a replacement to a TV, but only as an addition to watch movies on.
banned#21
PS:

two in stock at £399 (probably + delivery) at Projector Planet. Considering lots probably wont want the screen, or would prefer to choose their own size, and the screen is probably only £20 worth anyway, this is much cheaper:

http://www.projectorplanet.co.uk/Price_Drop!_Optoma_HD600X_Projector_-_HD_1002885.html



Edited By: Anarchist on Nov 07, 2010 11:48: :|
#22
I have an 84" screen in my converted integral garage and it is absolutely fine, no problems at all. I also use the 720p Optoma HD65 and the picture is stunning with my HD-DVD player hooked up to it. Looks great for normal DVD as well.
#23
Anarchist
PS:

two in stock at £399 (probably + delivery) at Projector Planet. Considering lots probably wont want the screen, or would prefer to choose their own size, and the screen is probably only £20 worth anyway, this is much cheaper:


http://www.projectorplanet.co.uk/Price_Drop!_Optoma_HD600X_Projector_-_HD_1002885.html





How do you know the 84" screen is £20, got a link to it. The Panoview 84" screen I bought was about £80!
banned#24
Scan also have this projector for £400 - free delivery for AV forum members (or free collection if you're near Bolton!)

http://www.scan.co.uk/products/optoma-hd600x-hd-ready-dlp-projector-720p-hdmi-vga-s-video

Hence, this deal is cold.
banned#25
jayok
How do you know the 84" screen is £20, got a link to it. The Panoview 84" screen I bought was about £80!

Google it - Panoviews can be got for £35 ish atm. I used to buy generic 150cm screens in for about £20 when I was installing projectors a couple or so years back.
#26
I have, can't find any for £20, got a link?
#27
I have the HD65 and with an 84" screen you need around 3 Meters.

It takes a while to get spot on alignment if you are ceiling mounting.

I an thinking of getting a 100" motorized screen.
The rainbow effect is there but you only notice it when moving your eyes or head quickly.

Even though it is 720p and not 1080p the picture is still stunning once set up.
Try watch Avatar Bluray.

I use my amp for scaling.
#28
@Anarchist
your info is incorrect i have a optoma hd67 and upgraded from a panasonic pt ae900 and the optoma dlp is much better than the panasonic and for years ive been using projectors instead of a tv and also the bulb is 300 hours on bright setting or 4000 on standard and to be honest there isnt much differance between the 2 settings i use mine on standar and its an amazing projector also optoma bulbs are not that expensive compared to most my bulb to replace is 100 quid odd for genuine optoma bulb also rainbow effect is down to the person viewing some people dont suffer from it at all some suffer minamal effects and some effected badly

false info
Anarchist
IMPORTANT: DRAWBACKS OF DLP (vs LCD/LED)
Increased fan noise - DLP's are noisy compared to the alternatives
Lower image quality - while DLP can provide higher resolutions more cheaply, the image quality is not as good due to various distortions and artifacts that can appear. I think they're called something like the rainbow effect and screen door effect.
Lower lamp life - the bulbs in this will not last very long, and are not cheap to replace. Optima quote this one as having 4000 hours but I would be extremely surprised if it lasted this long as that will not be given for it being used at full brightness. My guess would be 2500 hours at the brightness it would typically be used at which is probably two and a half years use.

I would not use this as a replacement to a TV, but only as an addition to watch movies on.

Edited By: tyson25 on Nov 07, 2010 15:37: to edit comments
banned#29
tyson25
@Anarchistyour info is incorrect i have a optoma hd67 and upgraded from a panasonic pt ae900 and the optoma dlp is much better than the panasonic and for years ive been using projectors instead of a tv and also the bulb is 300 hours on bright setting or 4000 on standard and to be honest there isnt much differance between the 2 settings i use mine on standar and its an amazing projector also optoma bulbs are not that expensive compared to most my bulb to replace is 100 quid odd for genuine optoma bulb also rainbow effect is down to the person viewing some people dont suffer from it at all some suffer minamal effects and some effected badly

Ooh, an AE900 eh? I haven't installed one of those in about... five years. So you're comparing a current, 2010 projector to one probably released six years ago and then claiming DLP is much better than LCD because of it?

Jesus, you are dumb. You CANNOT compare six year old technology to current, then claim it's much better because of it. Try comparing it to its current equivilent, then come back and say the same thing, and we'll all laugh at you (again).

Firstly, the Panasonic is only 1100 Lumens I believe. Way down on the HD67's 1600. That, I would guess, is 90% of why you believe your Optima is 'much better' than the Panasonic. Simple people think brightness is the only standard of image quality as they have no experience in spotting the other important factors.

Secondly, I think you made a typo on 300. 3000 perhaps. Well, even if that is true, I hardly think I was far out on my guess of 2500 - and to be honest if your 3000 is based on Optimas own given information then I would be dubious about that anyway as they always overquote for obvious reasons. But then again, based on the rest of your post, I would guess that this number is just one you made up on the spot and has no relevance to anything :\

Next, Bulbs are coming in about £140-£150 from my supplier, so I'd be surprised if you could get them for £100. Thats still relatively cheap for a bulb though - but prices only go up once the projector is discontinued (which will be when you need to replace the bulb). I would recommend you get one or two with the projector to make sure you don't get caught by this.

Next, the Rainbow effect is purely down to the DLP technology. It's not magic, its not in peoples heads that randomly make them see fringing etc, the pixellation from DLP is not some form of voodoo caused by ecstacy overdosing, it is the DLP tech. LCD does not suffer any of this. Just because some peoples eyes are not sensitive to this, does not make it any better.

Finally, I don't care if you've been using projectors for years instead of TV's. I didn't say people shouldn't, or can't, I just said that I wouldn't use this one as. I am not rubbishing this deal, I think it's a fine projector for people to setup a relatively cheap home cinema with, and think it is a good deal. I am just pointing out that there are drawbacks to the DLP tech that the projector uses - while it offers good specifications for its price, there are downsides.

PS please use punctuation (and preferably a spell check) in your post, it makes picking apart your attempt at trying to be clever a little more difficult (or easy, whichever way you look at it)

PPS My knowledge is based on having installed, setup, and used many, many, many projectors. I have seen pretty much all of them - from £220 toshiba VGA's to £35k Epson conference installs, and have used plenty in home cinema setups. Not from having owned two then thinking I know everything.

Edited By: Anarchist on Nov 07, 2010 21:15: :|
#30
[quote=talksalot81]Agreed with regards to the input feed. People were using video projector quite happily long before 1080 was even dreamt about. To be honest, these definition terms are used too easily as the 'be all and end all'; they are not. To give analogy, we have sports cars, luxury sedans, super minis.... those are our resolutions. However, every idiot knows that an mazda mx5 is simply a million miles away from being a porsche 911. The same goes for resolutions. An individual who knows what he is doing will be able to produce a 720p image which will walk all over the 1080p image which Joe Public achieves with his Currys plasma and blurap player. So do not get too hung up on resolutions!!![/quote

Care to give a bit more info?

How can i improve 720p?

Thanks
suspended#31
calibrate professionally, or look for calibrated settings. Check out the relevant thread on AV forums. Control your environment, improve audio, get better source material if possible.
#32
Sorry, forgot about this. As stated, proper calibration makes a massive difference. This can be done yourself with the user settings, you can get into it further and go through service settings (it is not really difficult) or you can get it done by a professional (though I would likely suggest getting a better projector before you bothered spending £500 on calibration!). Source quality is also important and a budget HD player can easily make mistakes that result in a decent dvd player actually looking better.

It all depends upon your priorities. I used to have about £5k worth of projector/player/video processor and it was highly watchable even back in the days when the projector resolution was 800x600. 720p was a revelation when it came around and looked absolutely spectacular. There are a lot of lovely, full, HD systems out there but they often leave me feeling that something is wrong. There is more to an image than sharpness. It is like taking a dragster around a race track... image is about all round performance and people have forgotten things like color reproduction, white and dark levels and detail etc.
#33
This is wrong price is £479 and no free screen
#34
Over a 2 month old deal.
Guess it can be expired now.
#35
Still going

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Top of Page
Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!