Panasonic Eneloop AA 1900mAh Rechargeable Battery Pack of 8 for £11.99 @ Battery Force - HotUKDeals
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Panasonic Eneloop AA 1900mAh Rechargeable Battery Pack of 8 for £11.99 @ Battery Force

£11.99 @ Battery Force
This is the Panasonic official UK retailer. The Panasonic Eneloop Ready to Use rechargeable battery range is now available at Battery Force! The Panasonic Eneloop AA Ready to Use 1900mAh batte… Read More
azure360 Avatar
1m, 1w agoFound 1 month, 1 week ago
This is the Panasonic official UK retailer.

The Panasonic Eneloop Ready to Use rechargeable battery range is now available at Battery Force!

The Panasonic Eneloop AA Ready to Use 1900mAh battery is a long-life, pre-charged, energy and money saving all round battery which can be charged and discharged up to 2100 times.

The New and improved eneloop technology now holds 70% of its capacity after 5 years in storage.
More From Battery Force:
azure360 Avatar
1m, 1w agoFound 1 month, 1 week ago
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1 Like #1
Interesting but not heard of the retailer.
1 Like #2
Mebster
Interesting but not heard of the retailer.

I found it in the Panasonic official retailers website. Apparently based in Manchester and operating for 13 years. I bought 8 of each aa&aaa, paid with PayPal and received a confirmation email.
https://www.panasonic.com/global/consumer/battery/eneloop/store.html
#3
Ordered thanks! For some reason price dropped to £11.39 at checkout too! Well every little helps! :p
#4
to be honest , it is overpriced. voted cold sorry
#5
nice price for these and always great, £15+ everywhere on ebay so thanks
3 Likes #6
Also consider Ikea LADDA, £5.50 for a pack of 4 2450mAh. They're made in Japan by the same manufacturer as Eneloops.
#7
sisqoboy2
to be honest , it is overpriced. voted cold sorry
Have you seen this product cheaper elsewhere? If so where?
7 Likes #8
sisqoboy2
to be honest , it is overpriced. voted cold sorry
I don't agree. Your 8 duracells for £2.49 will be in the landfill this time next month but my eneloops will still be going strong in 10 years time which. I've been using rechargeables for over 30 years and can't believe how many people still use disposable batteries. It's such a waste of money but people don't see it. Madness

Edited By: nougat on Apr 19, 2017 09:07
4 Likes #9
Rechargeable Batteries
Rechargeable batteries and battery chargers are a no brainer decision for the vast majority of applications and uses. The initial price tag is higher, but the overall savings are very easy to add up. A rechargeable battery is on average, good for 1000 recycles. Higher capacities and low self-discharge technology is increasing the time between charges and further improving the savings.

Did you Know?

A High Quality Battery Charger with 4 x AA batteries costs £20. The electricity cost of charging 4 X AA batteries is around 1p. So for 1000 cycles of 4 x AA batteries, the total cost is £30.

Compare that to:

A High quality brand of 4 x AA batteries costs around £2.50 (Discounted) - it can be up to £5 in a large store. 1000 x £2.50 = £2500

Over the life of these batteries, you will save around £2470.

I can highly recommend this charger

Edited By: nougat on Apr 19, 2017 09:27: charger
#10
I'm intrigued by the statement 'The New and improved eneloop technology now holds 70% of its capacity after 5 years in storage' . Does this mean they will keep there charge out of the packet for 5 years , or after subsequent recharging or both ? If its the latter it's impressive , there is nothing more annoying that trying to use something where the battery charge has decayed and you have to wait hours to recharge the batteries, although i suspect this is more related to the device slowly draining the batteries even when its switched off. It would be interesting to try and test the claims , what are the chances of getting your money back if this isn't true after 5 years
3 Likes #11
Downside is that rechargeables are lower voltage (1.2v vs 1.5v). I have a DAB radio which doesn't like the lower voltage (4.8v vs 6v for 4). I do use rechargeable wherever I can though.
#12
Just bought the AA's. I've a few eneloops and they are definately the best rechargables I have. I've been a bit lazy recently and buying Wilcos 99p for 4 - they're great, as good as 4 duracell IMHO. But, yeah, I shouldn't be wasting my money when I can invest in these.
nougat
Rechargeable Batteries
Rechargeable batteries and battery chargers are a no brainer decision for the vast majority of applications and uses. The initial price tag is higher, but the overall savings are very easy to add up. A rechargeable battery is on average, good for 1000 recycles. Higher capacities and low self-discharge technology is increasing the time between charges and further improving the savings.
Did you Know?
A High Quality Battery Charger with 4 x AA batteries costs £20. The electricity cost of charging 4 X AA batteries is around 1p. So for 1000 cycles of 4 x AA batteries, the total cost is £30.
Compare that to:
A High quality brand of 4 x AA batteries costs around £2.50 (Discounted) - it can be up to £5 in a large store. 1000 x £2.50 = £2500
Over the life of these batteries, you will save around £2470.
I can highly recommend this charger
#13
Besford
Downside is that rechargeables are lower voltage (1.2v vs 1.5v). I have a DAB radio which doesn't like the lower voltage (4.8v vs 6v for 4). I do use rechargeable wherever I can though.

Good point. I bought these rechargables hoping they'll work on a AA Battery operated toothbrush. After testing and failing on some old rechargables, I just assumed they were duff before I came across the voltage issue.
#14
nougat
Rechargeable Batteries
Rechargeable batteries and battery chargers are a no brainer decision for the vast majority of applications and uses. The initial price tag is higher, but the overall savings are very easy to add up. A rechargeable battery is on average, good for 1000 recycles. Higher capacities and low self-discharge technology is increasing the time between charges and further improving the savings.
Did you Know?
A High Quality Battery Charger with 4 x AA batteries costs £20. The electricity cost of charging 4 X AA batteries is around 1p. So for 1000 cycles of 4 x AA batteries, the total cost is £30.
Compare that to:
A High quality brand of 4 x AA batteries costs around £2.50 (Discounted) - it can be up to £5 in a large store. 1000 x £2.50 = £2500
Over the life of these batteries, you will save around £2470.
I can highly recommend this charger
Rechargeables make sense if you have devices that are heavy users of batteries. Rule of thumb is if the AAs in a device will last for less than a year of use, rechargeables make sense and also the device should be using a lithium ion pack for lower weight, greater capacity etc.

Unfortunately there are so many devices that don't obey this rule, in my house it's game controllers.
#15
Great price these!! I brought 16!! For my radio microphones! Can anyone recommend a good 8 battery charger? Many thanks
#16
chrisshein
Great price these!! I brought 16!! For my radio microphones! Can anyone recommend a good 8 battery charger? Many thanks

This one. https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00SMI622M/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Can charge batteries individually rather than having to charge multiple ones at same time. Does AA and AAA and even 9v. LCD display shows you exactly how charged each battery is. Been using one for a year without any issues. Might want to reduce the fuse though, for some reason it came with a 13amp fuse which is insane for a battery charger (I put a 5A in there).

Back to the topic. Is 1900mAh not a bit poor for batteries? I've been reading a lot about eneloops for a while and they seem to be the bee's knees and all.... yet my batteries are minimum 2600mAh and not "chinese mAh" either, real figures. So don't they do any higher than 1900?
#17
Will these batteries work with this charger?

Duracell 15 minutes Battery Charger
#18
daskapital
chrisshein
Great price these!! I brought 16!! For my radio microphones! Can anyone recommend a good 8 battery charger? Many thanks

This one. https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00SMI622M/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Can charge batteries individually rather than having to charge multiple ones at same time. Does AA and AAA and even 9v. LCD display shows you exactly how charged each battery is. Been using one for a year without any issues. Might want to reduce the fuse though, for some reason it came with a 13amp fuse which is insane for a battery charger (I put a 5A in there).

Back to the topic. Is 1900mAh not a bit poor for batteries? I've been reading a lot about eneloops for a while and they seem to be the bee's knees and all.... yet my batteries are minimum 2600mAh and not "chinese mAh" either, real figures. So don't they do any higher than 1900?


Thanks for this advice. Very much Appreciated
1 Like #19
adethespade
I'm intrigued by the statement 'The New and improved eneloop technology now holds 70% of its capacity after 5 years in storage' . Does this mean they will keep there charge out of the packet for 5 years , or after subsequent recharging or both ?
NiMH batteries suffer from self-discharge. They self-discharge much faster than alkaline.

So 70% discharge after 5 years just means that's the self-discharge rate. Which is very good for NiMH.

Out of the packet they are usable but not charged to 100%. It's not that they have lost charge sitting in the packet...the manufacturer doesn't charge to 100% deliberately.
1 Like #20
daskapital

Back to the topic. Is 1900mAh not a bit poor for batteries?
The capacity is good. How they rate capacity is complicated but on high drain devices nimh work for much longer than an equivalent rated alkaline (because they provide a usable voltage for much longer).

On low drain devices (battery remotes etc) alkaline will usually last longer, not because of capacity but because of nimh self-discharge.

The lower capacity eneloops typically have lower self-discharge and therefore are more suited to remote controls etc.

You can get 2500mAh Eneloop AA if you want them.

Edited By: voodooboard on Apr 19, 2017 11:44
2 Likes #21
daskapital
chrisshein
Great price these!! I brought 16!! For my radio microphones! Can anyone recommend a good 8 battery charger? Many thanks

This one. https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00SMI622M/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Can charge batteries individually rather than having to charge multiple ones at same time. Does AA and AAA and even 9v. LCD display shows you exactly how charged each battery is. Been using one for a year without any issues. Might want to reduce the fuse though, for some reason it came with a 13amp fuse which is insane for a battery charger (I put a 5A in there).

Back to the topic. Is 1900mAh not a bit poor for batteries? I've been reading a lot about eneloops for a while and they seem to be the bee's knees and all.... yet my batteries are minimum 2600mAh and not "chinese mAh" either, real figures. So don't they do any higher than 1900?


They do Pro versions, 2500mh which I have. They are beasts compared to Energizer/Duracell
#22
chrisshein
Great price these!! I brought 16!! For my radio microphones! Can anyone recommend a good 8 battery charger? Many thanks

"...brought..."! Oh dear. :(
1 Like #23
Might be a silly question, but can you use these batteries in cordless phones? Will they charge up OK in the phone dock?
#24
nougat
Rechargeable Batteries
Rechargeable batteries and battery chargers are a no brainer decision for the vast majority of applications and uses. The initial price tag is higher, but the overall savings are very easy to add up. A rechargeable battery is on average, good for 1000 recycles. Higher capacities and low self-discharge technology is increasing the time between charges and further improving the savings.
Did you Know?
A High Quality Battery Charger with 4 x AA batteries costs £20. The electricity cost of charging 4 X AA batteries is around 1p. So for 1000 cycles of 4 x AA batteries, the total cost is £30.
Compare that to:
A High quality brand of 4 x AA batteries costs around £2.50 (Discounted) - it can be up to £5 in a large store. 1000 x £2.50 = £2500
Over the life of these batteries, you will save around £2470.
I can highly recommend this charger
50 Duracell Procell (aka Duracell Industrial) batteries cost £15.49 on eBay.
Based on this, the saving is about £1,209.20 - Rechargeable is still cheaper, just wanted to give a more realistic view.
Your calculation also doesn't take into account that you can only use 4 batteries at any one point, so potentially need more than just 4 batteries.
1 Like #25
Besford
chrisshein
Great price these!! I brought 16!! For my radio microphones! Can anyone recommend a good 8 battery charger? Many thanks
"...brought..."! Oh dear. :(
Sorry for my bad english!!
#26
Gigzz
nougat
Rechargeable Batteries
Rechargeable batteries and battery chargers are a no brainer decision for the vast majority of applications and uses. The initial price tag is higher, but the overall savings are very easy to add up. A rechargeable battery is on average, good for 1000 recycles. Higher capacities and low self-discharge technology is increasing the time between charges and further improving the savings.
Did you Know?
A High Quality Battery Charger with 4 x AA batteries costs £20. The electricity cost of charging 4 X AA batteries is around 1p. So for 1000 cycles of 4 x AA batteries, the total cost is £30.
Compare that to:
A High quality brand of 4 x AA batteries costs around £2.50 (Discounted) - it can be up to £5 in a large store. 1000 x £2.50 = £2500
Over the life of these batteries, you will save around £2470.
I can highly recommend this charger
50 Duracell Procell (aka Duracell Industrial) batteries cost £15.49 on eBay.
Based on this, the saving is about £1,209.20 - Rechargeable is still cheaper, just wanted to give a more realistic view.
Your calculation also doesn't take into account that you can only use 4 batteries at any one point, so potentially need more than just 4 batteries.
Sorry can't take the credit for that it came from here
#27
worth considering this - its not as simple as lower voltage, almost all devices are designed to tolerate 1.2v, and see here:

http://www.stefanv.com/electronics/using_nimh/nimh_vs_alkaline.gif
#28
Abbadon2001
worth considering this - its not as simple as lower voltage, almost all devices are designed to tolerate 1.2v, and see here:http://www.stefanv.com/electronics/using_nimh/nimh_vs_alkaline.gif
By and large that supports my experience too but I've got an older Roberts DAB radio which eats batteries (like all DABs do) and simply refuses to work properly at 4.8v. Not a common problem but worth being aware of before you throw out the device (as I nearly did).
#29
Reflective
Will these batteries work with this charger?Duracell 15 minutes Battery Charger
I believe they will but fast charging batteries reduces their life.....

Edited By: afroylnt on Apr 19, 2017 15:16
#30
Besford
Downside is that rechargeables are lower voltage (1.2v vs 1.5v). I have a DAB radio which doesn't like the lower voltage (4.8v vs 6v for 4). I do use rechargeable wherever I can though.


Have a look at NI-ZN (Nickel Zinc)
rechargeable AA's, they are 1.6v per cell.
#31
Would these work ok in a rechargeable lamp (similar to the ones linked below) which only gets used to odd weekend?

Your text here
#32
Dont buy any decent rechargeable battery, unless you buy an intelligent charger. Wasting you money otherwise!
#33
chrish2114
Might be a silly question, but can you use these batteries in cordless phones? Will they charge up OK in the phone dock?
You can, but you don't get the advantage of the low self-discharge because they spend most of their time in the charger.
#34
Besford
Abbadon2001
worth considering this - its not as simple as lower voltage, almost all devices are designed to tolerate 1.2v, and see here:http://www.stefanv.com/electronics/using_nimh/nimh_vs_alkaline.gif
By and large that supports my experience too but I've got an older Roberts DAB radio which eats batteries (like all DABs do) and simply refuses to work properly at 4.8v. Not a common problem but worth being aware of before you throw out the device (as I nearly did).
And the SureFlap cat flap is an excellent product which works fine on LSD rechargeables... except the low battery LED flashes for six months at a time! :(
#35
I bought 4 lidl aa rechargeable batteries for £3 so this is how I compare this price.
#36
sisqoboy2
I bought 4 lidl aa rechargeable batteries for £3 so this is how I compare this price.
Only if they are low self-discharge types.
#37
sisqoboy2
I bought 4 lidl aa rechargeable batteries for £3 so this is how I compare this price.
You said these were overpriced and said you had bought these 2 days before. I'm not psychic!
#38
Mine came today £11.39 , made in Japan 08/2016
#39
Back in stock

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