Panasonic VIERA TX50X10B 50" HD ready Plasma TV - £679.99 Inc Delivery - HotUKDeals
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TO GET THIS PRICE YOU HAVE TO USE THE CODE..... 70SAVE

The VIERA TXP50X10B 50?D Ready Plasma TV comes with a stunning array of technologies to let you enjoy outstanding quality viewing and a range of networking possibilities.

With the winning combination of 100HZ Double Scan, Panasonic?Intelligent Frame Creation and an incredible 0.001 Response rate, the VIERA TXP50X10B produces flicker free, flowing moving images, that?perfect for watching fast actions sports and movies.

With colours of depth and range to appear true to life, the VIERA TXP50X10B HD Ready Plasma also includes Panasonic?Real Black Drive system that works to reproduce the fine balance of light and dark with outstanding results.

Sound quality is provided from V-Audio technology. Together with a digital amplifier, carbon speakers, slim side speakers and SRS Tru surround or BBE VIVA HD3D sound, the TXP50X10B?produces crystal clear audio, with deep rich bass tones and optimal sound localisation for a really immersive movie theatre style experience.

The TXP50X10B features Panasonic?VIERA Link which enables you to operate your TV and compatible home theatre equipment from a single remote control. With HDMI capability, the VIERA Link can carry audio and digital video through a single cable so you can operate your Blu-Ray Disc player, DIGA DVD recorder or Panasonic HD camcorder without the hassle of using several remotes.

Also featuring an SDHC Card Reader, the VIERA TXP50X10B 50?D Ready Plasma TV lets you view your photos and home videos from its 50?creen directly from a digital camera?memory card. You also have the choice of 3 types of background music and 4 display effects.


2,000,000:1 Dynamic Contrast
100hz
Built-in digital TV tuner
3x HDMI, 2x SCART, 1x Component, 1x PC
V Real Pro 4 Image technology
NICAM stereo sound
SD card reader for Photos
Available in 37", 42"
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#1
is this 720p or 1080p?
#2
Tom Pickering
is this 720p or 1080p?


Not a 1080p set :x
#3
100hz for a plasma not that good either, 600hz from panasonic now
#4
I have a 5 year old Panasonic PDW6 42 inch plasma and it is still superb even compared to other family members 720p and 1080p lcds and plasmas even though the resolution is only 852 x 480. BBC HD lookds superb on it and the sd picture is very good with free sat.

I for one would have a plasma again for sure over an lcd as the picture is more natural and blacks are blacker.

I will get a full hd tv when this one packs in and not before as it is still very good and cost £1400 back when I got it:shock:
#5
http://www.panasonic.co.uk/html/en_GB/Products/VIERA+Plasma+and+LCD+TVs/VIERA+Plasma+TV/TX-P50X10/Specification/2078737/index.html?trackInfo=true

http://tinyurl.com/onm3uu

TV Tuner
Tuner Integrated yes
DVB Digital Tuner Y [DVB-T]
Tuning System PLL synthesizer 100-position auto-search tuner
CATV Compatibility UK
Broadcast Stereo Reception NICAM (FM)
Teletext Reception 1000P Level 2.5, FASTEXT/LIST
Receiving System PAL-I, DVB-T
Receiving System(AV Input) PAL-525/60, SECAM, NTSC, M-NTSC
Display
Screen Size 50" (127 cm) diagonal
Screen Aspect 16 : 9 Wide
Panel G12 Progressive HD Plasma Display Panel
Viewing Angle Viewing Angle Free
Response Speed 0.001 msec. (Time of discharge after the drive pulse signal of the panel is sent.)
Natural Vision Filter AR
Progressive Scan yes
Number of Pixels 1,049,088 (1,366 x 768) pixels
Applicable PC signals VGA, WVGA, SVGA, XGA, WXGA, SXGA 60Hz
Applicable Scanning Format 525 (480)/60i, 525 (480)/60p, 625 (576)/50i, 625 (576)/50p, 750 (720)/50p, 750 (720)/60p, / 1125 (1080)/50i, 1125 (1080)/60i, 1125 (1080)/24p (HDMI only), 1125 (1080)/50p (HDMI only), 1125 (1080)/60p (HDMI only)
Contrast Ratio (in dark surroundings) Dynamic: 2,000,000:1; Native: 20,000:1
Moving Picture Resolution 720 lines
24p Playback yes
100 Hz Double Scan yes
Shades of Gradation 4,096 equivalent steps of gradation
x.v. Colour yes
Digital Optimiser yes
3D Colour Management yes
Sub Pixel Control yes
Picture Overscan yes
Motion Pattern Noise Reduction yes
Video Noise Reduction yes
3D Comb Filter yes
Picture Mode Dynamic/Normal/Cinema/Game
Vreal Vreal 4
Sound
Speaker System Bottom speaker
Speakers Full-Range (16 x 4 cm) x 2 (L,R)
Audio Output 20 W (10 W x 2), 10% THD
Sound Mode Music/Speech
Surround V-Audio Surround
Input/Output
CI (Common Interface)* yes
VIERA Image Viewer yes (JPEG playback)
HDMI Input 3 (1 side, 2 rear) [ver. 1.3 with x.v.Colour]
Composite Video Input AV3: RCA phono type x 1 (side)
S-Video Input AV3: Mini DIN 4-pin (side)
Audio Input (for Video) AV3: RCA phono type connectors (L, R) (1 set, side)
Component Video Input RCA phono type x 3 [Y , PB, PR] (rear)
PC Input Mini D-sub 15-pin x 1 (rear)
Audio Input (for HDMI, PC, Component) RCA phono type connectors (L, R) x 2 sets (rear x 1 set, side x 1 set)
21-Pin Input/Output AV1: AV In/Out, RGB In, Q-Link (rear) / AV2: AV In/Out, S-Video In, RGB In, Q-Link (rear)
Monitor Out RCA phono type connectors (L, R) (1 set rear)
Audio Output Headphone jack (1 side)
Features
EPG yes
Remote Controller IR
VIERA Tools yes
VIERA Link Y (HDAVI Control 4)
Screen Saver Wobbling
Multi Window PAT
Eco Mode** yes
Game Mode yes
Q-Link yes
Aspect Controls Auto/16:9/14:9/Just/4:3/Zoom1/Zoom2/Zoom3
On-Screen Display Languages English
Hold yes
Off Timer yes
Child Lock yes
General
Power Save Mode yes
Power Supply AC 220 - 240 V, 50/60Hz
Rated Power Consumption 350 W
On mode Average Power Consumption*** 284 W
Standby Power Consumption 0.7 W
Dimensions W/O stand (W x H x D) 1,218 x 769 x 105 mm
Dimensions with stand (W x H x D) 1,218 x 814 x 401 mm
Weight W/O stand 34.0 kg
Weight with stand 36.0 kg
Operating Temperature 0°C - 35°C
Further Specifications
NOTE * Common Interface Terminal to accommodate Conditional Access Module for additional Digital services i.e. Top-Up TV / ** Contrast Automatic Tracking System / *** Based on IEC 62087 Ed.2 measurement method.
#6
Zuulan
Not a 1080p set :x


Tell us when 1080p will be broadcast?
#7
You can get a further 4% back using quidco!

The voucher is £70 off any purchase above £700

Hot and thanks.

Trying to decide between this and the LG 50PQ6000 for £699 (delivered with 5yr warranty from john lewis) or £599 + $59 instore only at richer sounds, so hard to decide!
#8
Good deal. I wish i had the money and the living room for this tv!
#9
ascen
You can get a further 4% back using quidco!

The voucher is £70 off any purchase above £700

Hot and thanks.

Trying to decide between this and the LG 50PQ6000 for £699 (delivered with 5yr warranty from john lewis) or £599 + $59 instore only at richer sounds, so hard to decide!


I have had 3 Panasonic plasma sets over the lst 3 yrs , still have 2 at home , so would be biased to say these are quality sets ahead of anyone else , BUT a friend has the LG & it is a quality set in its own right . I'd also not think twice with going with that from JL whose 5 yr warranty is worth its weight in gold anyway . Currys customer services , in my experience , leave a lot to be desired , Richer Sounds & JL have always been quality people to deal with .

1080P is not all it is cracked up to be anyway , I actually prefer 1080i or even 720p over it . It is a buzz word that everyone thinks they need , they don't . The previously mentioned members PW6 panel walks all over most sets anyway as does my own PH10 .
#10
Panasonic rule I'm loving my new one I love it and these are supposed to be great too.
#11
davt99;5316511
Tell us when 1080p will be broadcast?


Has been since 2006. Anything recorded on film is broadcast at 1080p 25frames/sec in a 1080i50 carrier stream. Your TV reconstructs the original.

Anything shot on video (which includes everything live) is at native 1080i 50frames/sec.
#12
Excellent post !
good deal !
#13
thanks op for post +1

By the way, what the hell is going on in this post? I thought this post was for a telly, theres so many insults flying around, your making MTVs Your Momma look like a Cbeebies program. Focus on the deals folks, not on insulting your fellow dealseekers!

And help me find a 1080p 40" please, preferably Sony, thanks in advance!!!!
#14
arfster
Has been since 2006. Anything recorded on film is broadcast at 1080p 25frames/sec in a 1080i50 carrier stream. Your TV reconstructs the original.

Anything shot on video (which includes everything live) is at native 1080i 50frames/sec.


Well put, don't know what you mean, but it kind of makes sense lol
#15
Excellent post !
good deal !
#16
Hanamann;5317751
Well put, don't know what you mean, but it kind of makes sense lol


Hrrrm, OK, it was a bit jargonish I guess.

1080p means a resolution of 1920*1080 pixels, and for TV broadcasts that's made up of 25 separate pictures (aka frames) shot per second - that's the speed of film.

1080i means a resolution of 1920*540 pixels (ie half the vertical resolution of 1080p), but shot 50 times a second - the speed of video cameras. This is better in particular for sports.


Because 1080i frames are half the size but there are twice as many of them, the overall signal takes the same amount of bandwidth - in the region of 10 to 15 megabits/second, depending on the channel. There are 1080p 50 frames/second cameras around, but there isn't space on the airwaves to broadcast that (there isn't space on the satellites because we have such a clear need for 345623454353 shopping channels) - they would take 20 to 25 mbits/second.


Where the confusion occurs is that broadcasters have to standardise on a single broadcast standard. A 1080p 25f/s signal can be shoehorned into a 1080i 50f/s transmission via various clever means without losing any quality at all, so they chose to do that. It's just a technical difference that has no effect to the end user - they still receive the exact original 1080p. However, people see the headline figure of "a 1080i broadcast", remember being told that's inferior to 1080p, and assume they don't need a 1080p TV as a result.
#17
personally, i think it's a bit silly asking whether or not there are stations broadcasting 1080p signals - lets face it, 90% of the high def material you watch at the moment will not be from broadcast TV, it'll be from games consoles and blu-rays.

and regardless of which is better between 1080p and 1080i, an image with a resolution of 1920x1080 pixels cannot be displayed on a screen of 1280x720 pixels - regardless of whether the image is interpolated at 50hz, or progressive at 25hz. (and lets not forget that a 1080p set can display 1080i displays)

For my personal tastes, any television i buy would be connected to a pc - and there is a *massive* difference in quality of text between the two resolutions. i personally would look towards a smaller display, with a higher resolution, but this is a good deal for a 50" tv.
#18
Great TV, great price. You would want a 1080p set though if:

You sit closer than 10ft (about 6 1/2 ft is ideal for 1080p on a set this size)
You watch lots of BluRay
You want to boast to your mates that you have a 1080p set

Honestly. I have this set and BluRay looks stunning on it, even at only 720p.
#19
dantheman3989

i prefer LCD as theyre lighter, cheaper to run, and i personally prefer the colours and contrast.
but im guessing someone will come along and say no, youre wrong etc.
you cant bloody win no matter what you say!


Lighter - yes. (however if you're going to wall-mount a large screen, which is very likely for a 50" set, weight doesn't really play much part in it).

Cheaper to run - yes, but not anywhere near as much as you think. LCDs have active pixels all the time and a constant backlight. Therefore the power usage is constant. Plasmas work differently - the panel emits its own light and true blacks are achieved by not activating that 'area'.

Colours and Contrast - you'll get some debate here on these alone. I'm guessing you've either not seen a decent Plasma recently (as they have 'grown up' a helluva lot) or the one you saw was ill-configured.

Go to any TV review site and your standard Plasma TV will outperform your LCD in both colour and contrast without really trying.

Take it from someone who was, like you, dead against Plasma technology. Plasma TVs are the closest thing to a flat CRT in terms of contrast and colour, with the added benefit of high definition crisp imaging. I have a 50" plasma at 1366 x 768 and believe me (and others who come over to see it), the live football in HD looks simply stunning. :thumbsup:
#20
I'm the first to admit I know very little about HD tellies, but I pretty much knew where I stood with Panasonic's old system of "numbering" their tvs, but haven't a clue with the current year's models. Can anyone confirm what the X10B signifies? (ie are we talking the equivalent of the 7 or 8 TVs, which were slightly inferior to the 70 or 80.)

Heat and rep added. Even if this isn't one of Panasonic's better tvs, a 50" panny beats most plasmas or lcds I've seen.

[size=1]*In my limited experience.
**Excludes Pioneers.
***Your home may be at risk if you do not keep up repayments on a mortgage or any other loan secured upon it.
****May contain nuts.[/size]
#21
The 42" version of this screen is great. Bet my friend wishes he'd spent an extra £30 on this living room dominator instead :thumbsup:
#22
this set doesnt have 1080p its 1125p even better =]

Ive got the same tv at home and the picture is unbelievable, amazing price for such a quality set
#23
arfster
Hrrrm, OK, it was a bit jargonish I guess.

1080p means a resolution of 1920*1080 pixels, and for TV broadcasts that's made up of 25 separate pictures (aka frames) shot per second - that's the speed of film.

1080i means a resolution of 1920*540 pixels (ie half the vertical resolution of 1080p), but shot 50 times a second - the speed of video cameras. This is better in particular for sports.


Because 1080i frames are half the size but there are twice as many of them, the overall signal takes the same amount of bandwidth - in the region of 10 to 15 megabits/second, depending on the channel. There are 1080p 50 frames/second cameras around, but there isn't space on the airwaves to broadcast that (there isn't space on the satellites because we have such a clear need for 345623454353 shopping channels) - they would take 20 to 25 mbits/second.


Where the confusion occurs is that broadcasters have to standardise on a single broadcast standard. A 1080p 25f/s signal can be shoehorned into a 1080i 50f/s transmission via various clever means without losing any quality at all, so they chose to do that. It's just a technical difference that has no effect to the end user - they still receive the exact original 1080p. However, people see the headline figure of "a 1080i broadcast", remember being told that's inferior to 1080p, and assume they don't need a 1080p TV as a result.


Very interesting post. The same type of post that's guaranteed to appear in every LCDvPlasma thread, but interesting nonetheless.

And I just love the way you tried to de-jargonise your original post with one ten times worse! Killer!
1 Like #24
Late
I'm the first to admit I know very little about HD tellies, but I pretty much knew where I stood with Panasonic's old system of "numbering" their tvs, but haven't a clue with the current year's models. Can anyone confirm what the X10B signifies? (ie are we talking the equivalent of the 7 or 8 TVs, which were slightly inferior to the 70 or 80.)

Heat and rep added. Even if this isn't one of Panasonic's better tvs, a 50" panny beats most plasmas or lcds I've seen.

[size=1]*In my limited experience.
**Excludes Pioneers.
***Your home may be at risk if you do not keep up repayments on a mortgage or any other loan secured upon it.
****May contain nuts.[/size]


In the scheme of Panny plasmas, the X10 is the 2nd bottom in the range, it sits about the C10. The next model up is the S10 after the X10 (which is 1080p), then the G10 (which adds Freesat) and then the V10 (not sure what it has)
#25
Have the 42" version of this and it is fantastic

SD via a normal sky+ box was really suprisingly good - when watching some programs it looks like HD

I also have my PC and xbox 360 hooked up via HDMI and I have an HD-DVD drive and believe me you wont be dissapointed with HD material on this set.

My only grumbles (and these come with the price) is the remote is not the nicest to look at and the menus have a few weird layouts but I can forgive those
#26
btw - very hot price for the 50"!!!!
#27
Late
I'm the first to admit I know very little about HD tellies, but I pretty much knew where I stood with Panasonic's old system of "numbering" their tvs, but haven't a clue with the current year's models. Can anyone confirm what the X10B signifies? (ie are we talking the equivalent of the 7 or 8 TVs, which were slightly inferior to the 70 or 80.)

Heat and rep added. Even if this isn't one of Panasonic's better tvs, a 50" panny beats most plasmas or lcds I've seen.

[size=1]*In my limited experience.
**Excludes Pioneers.
***Your home may be at risk if you do not keep up repayments on a mortgage or any other loan secured upon it.
****May contain nuts.[/size]


lol
#28
arfster
Hrrrm, OK, it was a bit jargonish I guess.

1080p means a resolution of 1920*1080 pixels, and for TV broadcasts that's made up of 25 separate pictures (aka frames) shot per second - that's the speed of film.

1080i means a resolution of 1920*540 pixels (ie half the vertical resolution of 1080p), but shot 50 times a second - the speed of video cameras. This is better in particular for sports.


Because 1080i frames are half the size but there are twice as many of them, the overall signal takes the same amount of bandwidth - in the region of 10 to 15 megabits/second, depending on the channel. There are 1080p 50 frames/second cameras around, but there isn't space on the airwaves to broadcast that (there isn't space on the satellites because we have such a clear need for 345623454353 shopping channels) - they would take 20 to 25 mbits/second.


Where the confusion occurs is that broadcasters have to standardise on a single broadcast standard. A 1080p 25f/s signal can be shoehorned into a 1080i 50f/s transmission via various clever means without losing any quality at all, so they chose to do that. It's just a technical difference that has no effect to the end user - they still receive the exact original 1080p. However, people see the headline figure of "a 1080i broadcast", remember being told that's inferior to 1080p, and assume they don't need a 1080p TV as a result.


Thanks for that, thats makes more sense to me!
#29
wow, this is usually the retail price for the 42" version, absolute bargain

not 1080p i know but if youre on a budget this is a cracking set

heat and rep addded
#30
Tallyho;5317551
1080P is not all it is cracked up to be anyway , I actually prefer 1080i or even 720p over it . It is a buzz word that everyone thinks they need , they don't . The previously mentioned members PW6 panel walks all over most sets anyway as does my own PH10 .


you prefer less resolution? 1080i & 720p to 1080p?
LOL all that means is that you dont have a 1080p set :-D
#31
Zuulan
Not a 1080p set :x


Its not a toaster either ........... some people :x
#32
phatboy123;5322896
you prefer less resolution? 1080i & 720p to 1080p?
LOL all that means is that you dont have a 1080p set :-D


I for one would not need a 1080p tv as I do not watch anything that needs it. I do not have a hd games system or blueray or hd dvd so it would be a waste. I have never bought dvds as once I have watched something once thats it to me its worthless. I download xvids so you see not everyone wants or needs full 1080p hd:thumbsup:
#33
arfster
Hrrrm, OK, it was a bit jargonish I guess.

1080p means a resolution of 1920*1080 pixels, and for TV broadcasts that's made up of 25 separate pictures (aka frames) shot per second - that's the speed of film.

1080i means a resolution of 1920*540 pixels (ie half the vertical resolution of 1080p), but shot 50 times a second - the speed of video cameras. This is better in particular for sports.


Because 1080i frames are half the size but there are twice as many of them, the overall signal takes the same amount of bandwidth - in the region of 10 to 15 megabits/second, depending on the channel. There are 1080p 50 frames/second cameras around, but there isn't space on the airwaves to broadcast that (there isn't space on the satellites because we have such a clear need for 345623454353 shopping channels) - they would take 20 to 25 mbits/second.


Where the confusion occurs is that broadcasters have to standardise on a single broadcast standard. A 1080p 25f/s signal can be shoehorned into a 1080i 50f/s transmission via various clever means without losing any quality at all, so they chose to do that. It's just a technical difference that has no effect to the end user - they still receive the exact original 1080p. However, people see the headline figure of "a 1080i broadcast", remember being told that's inferior to 1080p, and assume they don't need a 1080p TV as a result.


Perhaps you could have explained that the "i" stands for interlaced which is something we've grown up with thanks to good old CRTs with PAL/NTSC formats so nothing wrong with that. The1080i has the same 1920x1080 pixel resolution but only alternate lines are broadcast each frame to save bandwidth. Also Hollywood movies are 24 frames/second to be pedantic :)

It's amusing how much discussion on these forums is about techno babble which most people don't understand, why not comment on how good or bad the picture actually looks like in practise or whether there is a better deal somewhere else?

BTW I've got a 37" version of this and the picture is great, I chose it because most of the content is still SD and it looks very natural and as others have mentioned the closest to a good CRT set. So I'd say this is a hot deal, but I'd prefer to go to JL with their 5 year guarantee.
#34
How different is this Television compared to the John Lewis at 500 pounds http://www.hotukdeals.com/item/392026/panasonic-42-plasma-p42c10b-now-549/showthread.php?p=5125789&posted=1, besides the obvious 42 inch compared to the 50 inches. Does this have the Anti Reflective component?
#35
kharma45
In the scheme of Panny plasmas, the X10 is the 2nd bottom in the range, it sits about the C10. The next model up is the S10 after the X10 (which is 1080p), then the G10 (which adds Freesat) and then the V10 (not sure what it has)

Repped - thanks mate.
#36
Est541
How different is this Television compared to the John Lewis at 500 pounds http://www.hotukdeals.com/item/392026/panasonic-42-plasma-p42c10b-now-549/showthread.php?p=5125789&posted=1, besides the obvious 42 inch compared to the 50 inches. Does this have the Anti Reflective component?

Yes this one should have, according to AVforums the differences between this one (X10) and the cheaper C10 are:

- number of teletext pages stored
- Natural Vision Filter - AR (not on C10)
- PC input (not on C10)
- 2 HDMI inputs on C10, 3 on X10
- EPG for DVB-T (7days) - but not sure what - it seems ok on C10
- Eco Mode** - not on C10
#37
waj1234
I for one would not need a 1080p tv as I do not watch anything that needs it. I do not have a hd games system or blueray or hd dvd so it would be a waste.


What if you were given a PS3, or won one, or bought one from guy at the pub, then you'd regret not having 1080p:whistling:
#38
Tom Pickering;5324879
What if you were given a PS3, or won one, or bought one from guy at the pub, then you'd regret not having 1080p:whistling:


A ps3 is of no interest at all. I used to love my ps1 and snes before it but I am just not into this hd 3d gameplay. I prefer a good old fashioned platform. I suppose that is my upbringing on a speccy/c64 and amiga etc.

I did give a 360 a spin but only kept it 3 weeks as I find the games all the same and boring. So if someone did give me a ps3 I would sell it on here immediately without even plugging it in:thumbsup:
#39
I own both a Panasonic 50" 1080p and a Panasonic 37" 720p plasma. Unless I stand within 8 foot of the two screens I cannot notice any real difference when viewing 1080p Blu-Ray's. Both are miles better than the 720p Samsung LCD which the Panny 37" replaced.

1080p is overrated.

....and before anyone asks, my eyesight is pretty good.
#40
Tom Pickering
What if you were given a PS3, or won one, or bought one from guy at the pub, then you'd regret not having 1080p:whistling:


Aren't most of the graphics only 720 res natively - upscaled for 1080 output?

My 2p worth:
My 720p plasma is way better for films (SD & HD DVD) and SD broadcast than my much more expensive 1080p LCD.
The LCD is great for gaming and PC though!

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