Parkside Arc Welder £39.99 instore @ Lidl from Thursday - HotUKDeals
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Parkside Arc Welder £39.99 instore @ Lidl from Thursday

£39.99 @ LIDL
Seems a great price for a 100A arc welder. they also have an inverter model for £69.99: https://www.lidl.co.uk/en/Non-Food-Offers.htm?articleId=2890 Any thoughts on whether that's worth the extra £30… Read More
no1knows Avatar
1m, 2w agoFound 1 month, 2 weeks ago
Seems a great price for a 100A arc welder. they also have an inverter model for £69.99: https://www.lidl.co.uk/en/Non-Food-Offers.htm?articleId=2890

Any thoughts on whether that's worth the extra £30?
no1knows Avatar
1m, 2w agoFound 1 month, 2 weeks ago
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Top Comments

(5)
25 Likes
My dad taught me to weld stick when I was a kid, he said if you can weld with that you can weld anything.
We spent a summer welding a Triumph Herald convertible, Dad got sheet steal from work and cut it with tin snips and made floor panels. He refused to buy ready made panels lol. We got a MIG at some point for welding other cars but we managed to do this car with an Arc. Ahh bless him, miss my pops! Taught me everything.
24 Likes
Get the inverter model if you can, will be more energy efficient and shouldnt pop 13A fuses at max setting.
Also will have a more stable Arc making it much easier for a beginner and provide a more uniform weld.
Contrary to as said in earlier posts, Inverter sets do provide a better weld.

Duty cycle should also be better so you don't need to let it cool as long between welds or deal with thermal cutout continuously.

Normally Inverter sets have a higher open circuit voltage making it easier to strike an Arc. According to Lidl both have 68v OCV which is fine.

Few tips.

Get decent rods and leave them indoors in a cool dry cupboard, nothing worse than trying to weld with damp electrodes.

Also ditch the face shield and get a proper mask, will make life much easier learning if your not holding a shield.

Get decent gauntlets, UV burns on wrists are no fun.

If using an extension lead fully unwind it as these will definitely overheat it.

Get a pair of safety glasses for when you have finished welding. **** has a habit of pinging off in the direction of your eyes as it cools or as you chip it.

Be prepared for a few burns as sparks find there way down your back, it's almost guaranteed.

Personally I hate Arc welding but if had to chose one of those it would be inverter.

Edited By: callum84 on May 07, 2017 17:39: .
9 Likes
Whichever way you look at it, it's pretty exciting welding some handlebars to a metal plate
https://www.lidl.co.uk/catalog3media/uk/theme/250/complex/header_diytoolsandaccessories.jpg

Edited By: jasee on May 07, 2017 18:06: May 07, 2017 18:06
8 Likes
slightly niche. not once have I ever thought I'd nip to my local supermarket for an arc welder
[mod][Moderator] 8 Likes
Have absolutely no idea what I'd do with this, but I want one :D

All Comments

(84) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
Page:
#1
Whats the difference between this model and the Inverter one at £69.99?
8 Likes #2
slightly niche. not once have I ever thought I'd nip to my local supermarket for an arc welder
[mod][Moderator] 8 Likes #3
Have absolutely no idea what I'd do with this, but I want one :D
1 Like #4
Uses for a welder.....open a rescue centre for brass monkeys next winter ?
#5
Wowhats
Whats the difference between this model and the Inverter one at £69.99?
The simple answer, the cheaper one will be bigger and heavier. The technical answer , the cheaper one uses a transformer to generate the electric arc, the expensive one uses electrickery and probably is cheaper to make but more profitable.
2 Likes #6
same as inverter microwaves. more expensive but weighs less
1 Like #7
So, this seems like a terrible idea.

Surely anyone who knows how to weld would buy a more reliable brand. I mean I've lots of Lidl/Aldi tools as I'm fed up of my stuff going missing at work.

But a welder? This is not something you should convince hobbyists diy folk to be using.
4 Likes #8
rvcshart
So, this seems like a terrible idea.

Surely anyone who knows how to weld would buy a more reliable brand. I mean I've lots of Lidl/Aldi tools as I'm fed up of my stuff going missing at work.

But a welder? This is not something you should convince hobbyists diy folk to be using.


You could say the same about any tool.
#9
martroy
Wowhats
Whats the difference between this model and the Inverter one at £69.99?
The simple answer, the cheaper one will be bigger and heavier. The technical answer , the cheaper one uses a transformer to generate the electric arc, the expensive one uses electrickery and probably is cheaper to make but more profitable.[/qu
martroy
[quote=Wowhats] Whats the difference between this model and the Inverter one at £69.99?
The simple answer, the cheaper one will be bigger and heavier. The technical answer , the cheaper one uses a transformer to generate the electric arc, the expensive one uses electrickery and probably is cheaper to make but more profitable.
So theres no difference in welding performance, I suppose the cheaper model would be more expensive to run in electricity than the Inverter one.
2 Likes #10
Wowhats
martroy
Wowhats
Whats the difference between this model and the Inverter one at £69.99?
The simple answer, the cheaper one will be bigger and heavier. The technical answer , the cheaper one uses a transformer to generate the electric arc, the expensive one uses electrickery and probably is cheaper to make but more profitable.[/qu
martroy
[quote=Wowhats] Whats the difference between this model and the Inverter one at £69.99?
The simple answer, the cheaper one will be bigger and heavier. The technical answer , the cheaper one uses a transformer to generate the electric arc, the expensive one uses electrickery and probably is cheaper to make but more profitable.
So theres no difference in welding performance, I suppose the cheaper model would be more expensive to run in electricity than the Inverter one.


Unless you are welding all day every day I wouldn't worry about it
1 Like #11
SleepyChris
Wowhats
martroy
Wowhats
Whats the difference between this model and the Inverter one at £69.99?
The simple answer, the cheaper one will be bigger and heavier. The technical answer , the cheaper one uses a transformer to generate the electric arc, the expensive one uses electrickery and probably is cheaper to make but more profitable.[/qu
martroy
[quote=Wowhats] Whats the difference between this model and the Inverter one at £69.99?
The simple answer, the cheaper one will be bigger and heavier. The technical answer , the cheaper one uses a transformer to generate the electric arc, the expensive one uses electrickery and probably is cheaper to make but more profitable.
So theres no difference in welding performance, I suppose the cheaper model would be more expensive to run in electricity than the Inverter one.
Unless you are welding all day every day I wouldn't worry about it
And if you were welding all day every day , you would not be using cheap kit like this, this is really only for hobbyist work, thin sheet metal, the odd bit of light tubing etc.
2 Likes #12
Just one suggestion, if you do buy one of the Lidl welders, use the money you've saved to buy an auto darkening welding mask, about £20-30 on Amazon, in my opinion the best thing since sliced bread. Leaves both your hands free for the job and makes it much easier to strike the arc. A true professional may disagree but for the occasional job, marvellous.
#13
could this weld a car chassis?
1 Like #14
Made an Ark outta this last time on offerman & took two animals onboard to boot.
#15
SleepyChris
Wowhats
martroy
Wowhats
Whats the difference between this model and the Inverter one at £69.99?
The simple answer, the cheaper one will be bigger and heavier. The technical answer , the cheaper one uses a transformer to generate the electric arc, the expensive one uses electrickery and probably is cheaper to make but more profitable.[/qu
martroy
[quote=Wowhats] Whats the difference between this model and the Inverter one at £69.99?
The simple answer, the cheaper one will be bigger and heavier. The technical answer , the cheaper one uses a transformer to generate the electric arc, the expensive one uses electrickery and probably is cheaper to make but more profitable.
So theres no difference in welding performance, I suppose the cheaper model would be more expensive to run in electricity than the Inverter one.
Unless you are welding all day every day I wouldn't worry about it

If you were welding all day every day you wouldn't be using either of these models. Period.
#16
Bilbo1968
SleepyChris
Wowhats
martroy
Wowhats
Whats the difference between this model and the Inverter one at £69.99?
The simple answer, the cheaper one will be bigger and heavier. The technical answer , the cheaper one uses a transformer to generate the electric arc, the expensive one uses electrickery and probably is cheaper to make but more profitable.[/qu
martroy
[quote=Wowhats] Whats the difference between this model and the Inverter one at £69.99?
The simple answer, the cheaper one will be bigger and heavier. The technical answer , the cheaper one uses a transformer to generate the electric arc, the expensive one uses electrickery and probably is cheaper to make but more profitable.
So theres no difference in welding performance, I suppose the cheaper model would be more expensive to run in electricity than the Inverter one.
Unless you are welding all day every day I wouldn't worry about it

If you were welding all day every day you wouldn't be using either of these models. Period.


Agreed
1 Like #17
SleepyChris
Bilbo1968
SleepyChris
Wowhats
martroy
Wowhats
Whats the difference between this model and the Inverter one at £69.99?
The simple answer, the cheaper one will be bigger and heavier. The technical answer , the cheaper one uses a transformer to generate the electric arc, the expensive one uses electrickery and probably is cheaper to make but more profitable.[/qu
martroy
[quote=Wowhats] Whats the difference between this model and the Inverter one at £69.99?
The simple answer, the cheaper one will be bigger and heavier. The technical answer , the cheaper one uses a transformer to generate the electric arc, the expensive one uses electrickery and probably is cheaper to make but more profitable.
So theres no difference in welding performance, I suppose the cheaper model would be more expensive to run in electricity than the Inverter one.
Unless you are welding all day every day I wouldn't worry about it

If you were welding all day every day you wouldn't be using either of these models. Period.


Agreed


It could probably weeks all day every day...for a day
1 Like #18
The inverter, probably, will have DC output current, which produce a more stable arc than AC, easier controllable from a novice welder...both they will melt up to Φ2.5mm rods so don't expect to weld anything heavier than 3-4mm thickness plate..
#19
anyone used the warranties at lidl or aldi?How easy is it to claim?
1 Like #20
martroy
Just one suggestion, if you do buy one of the Lidl welders, use the money you've saved to buy an auto darkening welding mask, about £20-30 on Amazon, in my opinion the best thing since sliced bread. Leaves both your hands free for the job and makes it much easier to strike the arc. A true professional may disagree but for the occasional job, marvellous.

In other words the welding mask Lidl are selling for £30 in the same weekly specials offer as the welder X)

https://www.lidl.co.uk/en/Non-Food-Offers.htm?articleId=2887

:)
2 Likes #21
Luke I am your father.....

https://www.lidl.co.uk/catalog3media/uk/article/281392/gallery/overlay/lg/281392_01.jpg
2 Likes #22
The simple answer, the cheaper one will be bigger and heavier. The technical answer , the cheaper one uses a transformer to generate the electric arc, the expensive one uses electrickery and probably is cheaper to make but more profitable.

PARKSIDE!
24 Likes #23
Get the inverter model if you can, will be more energy efficient and shouldnt pop 13A fuses at max setting.
Also will have a more stable Arc making it much easier for a beginner and provide a more uniform weld.
Contrary to as said in earlier posts, Inverter sets do provide a better weld.

Duty cycle should also be better so you don't need to let it cool as long between welds or deal with thermal cutout continuously.

Normally Inverter sets have a higher open circuit voltage making it easier to strike an Arc. According to Lidl both have 68v OCV which is fine.

Few tips.

Get decent rods and leave them indoors in a cool dry cupboard, nothing worse than trying to weld with damp electrodes.

Also ditch the face shield and get a proper mask, will make life much easier learning if your not holding a shield.

Get decent gauntlets, UV burns on wrists are no fun.

If using an extension lead fully unwind it as these will definitely overheat it.

Get a pair of safety glasses for when you have finished welding. **** has a habit of pinging off in the direction of your eyes as it cools or as you chip it.

Be prepared for a few burns as sparks find there way down your back, it's almost guaranteed.

Personally I hate Arc welding but if had to chose one of those it would be inverter.

Edited By: callum84 on May 07, 2017 17:39: .
1 Like #24
pwel
The inverter, probably, will have DC output current, which produce a more stable arc than AC, easier controllable from a novice welder...both they will melt up to Φ2.5mm rods so don't expect to weld anything heavier than 3-4mm thickness plate..
Ac is fine for mma arc welding, you can weld any thickness with 2.5mm rods, just not going to be very quick or practical, imho.
#25
slevinkelevra
could this weld a car chassis?
wondering the same myself
#26
Wowhats
Whats the difference between this model and the Inverter one at £69.99?
It might be worth looking at the specs, but I would expect it to have high frequency ignition. That means you do not have to tap the metal to get the arc started. But I cannot find it in the specs, so I may be wrong.

Like most processes, arc welding is a matter of practice. Make sure you have the right safety equipment before you start.
#27
MrPuddington
Wowhats
Whats the difference between this model and the Inverter one at £69.99?
It might be worth looking at the specs, but I would expect it to have high frequency ignition. That means you do not have to tap the metal to get the arc started. But I cannot find it in the specs, so I may be wrong.
Like most processes, arc welding is a matter of practice. Make sure you have the right safety equipment before you start.
High frequency start is used for tig welding and usually found on tig/mma models.
No chance this will have it.
1 Like #28
scoobytawazara
anyone used the warranties at lidl or aldi?How easy is it to claim?
I have had quite a few power tools/electrical items from Lidl and Aldi over the years...non of the parkside stuff has failed under its 3 year garantee but the 3 items that have were a Livano Lux solar powererd exteror light/a DAB radio/and a tyre inflator all went faulty within a year...all 3 I just got a refund for at the till no problems...ALWAYS keep the receipts.

I have just retired as a gas engineer and have had quality stuff like Dewalt and Bosch etc but have found the Parkside stuff (although obviously not in the top league) to pretty good and definitely good valur for money.

I will be getting the £50 plunge saw (small single handed circular saw with laser guider) on Thurs as they hardly ever come in stock and its the one powertool I am missing
#29
pubquiz
scoobytawazara
anyone used the warranties at lidl or aldi?How easy is it to claim?
I have had quite a few power tools/electrical items from Lidl and Aldi over the years...non of the parkside stuff has failed under its 3 year garantee but the 3 items that have were a Livano Lux solar powererd exteror light/a DAB radio/and a tyre inflator all went faulty within a year...all 3 I just got a refund for at the till no problems...ALWAYS keep the receipts.
I have just retired as a gas engineer and have had quality stuff like Dewalt and Bosch etc but have found the Parkside stuff (although obviously not in the top league) to pretty good and definitely good valur for money.
I will be getting the £50 plunge saw (small single handed circular saw with laser guider) on Thurs as they hardly ever come in stock and its the one powertool I am missing
thanks very helpful
25 Likes #30
My dad taught me to weld stick when I was a kid, he said if you can weld with that you can weld anything.
We spent a summer welding a Triumph Herald convertible, Dad got sheet steal from work and cut it with tin snips and made floor panels. He refused to buy ready made panels lol. We got a MIG at some point for welding other cars but we managed to do this car with an Arc. Ahh bless him, miss my pops! Taught me everything.
1 Like #31
slevinkelevra
could this weld a car chassis?

It's very skilled to weld thin body panels with any arc welder. You're more likely to blow holes in it. Thicker stuff (if the body has a chassis) should be ok, but not if it's heavily rusted.
1 Like #32
Great for viewing eclipses (the glasses not the welding machine!)
1 Like #33
I think this is just a toy type which switches itself off after a few minutes of continuous work. Not really worth anything. Start with an oil cooled welder if you want to do anything serious
9 Likes #34
Whichever way you look at it, it's pretty exciting welding some handlebars to a metal plate
https://www.lidl.co.uk/catalog3media/uk/theme/250/complex/header_diytoolsandaccessories.jpg

Edited By: jasee on May 07, 2017 18:06: May 07, 2017 18:06
3 Likes #35
RustySpoons
My dad taught me to weld stick when I was a kid, he said if you can weld with that you can weld anything.
We spent a summer welding a Triumph Herald convertible, Dad got sheet steal from work and cut it with tin snips and made floor panels. He refused to buy ready made panels lol. We got a MIG at some point for welding other cars but we managed to do this car with an Arc. Ahh bless him, miss my pops! Taught me everything.


how nice kind reflection
1 Like #36
jasee
Whichever way you look at it, it's pretty exciting welding some handlebars to a metal platehttps://www.lidl.co.uk/catalog3media/uk/theme/250/complex/header_diytoolsandaccessories.jpg

I used to enjoy Scrapheap Challenge X)
#37
I have one of these and it overheats very quickly but for the price it's ok for small repair jobs etc
#38
rvcshart
So, this seems like a terrible idea.
Surely anyone who knows how to weld would buy a more reliable brand. I mean I've lots of Lidl/Aldi tools as I'm fed up of my stuff going missing at work.
But a welder? This is not something you should convince hobbyists diy folk to be using.
Why? It's a tool like any other, and it's a skill as well, so if you want to practice it it's a great entry. As long as you follow the basic safety rules of it you shouldn't be put off from doing welding at home. Worst thing that happens is the thing breaks.
2 Likes #39
croz123
slevinkelevra
could this weld a car chassis?
wondering the same myself
I'm guessing if you have to ask, then the question you should be asking yourself is "Can I weld a car chassis"
1 Like #40
japes
slightly niche. not once have I ever thought I'd nip to my local supermarket for an arc welder
Where is your sense of adventure :)

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