PARKSIDE Plunge Saw / Track Saw £59.99 @ Lidl - HotUKDeals
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PARKSIDE Plunge Saw / Track Saw £59.99 @ Lidl

alexfn Avatar
1y, 5m agoFound 1 year, 5 months ago
With all the other parkside deals posted this week i cant believe this one has been missed, now the impact driver is a deal but this is a steal

So why would you want a track saw? for those of you looking to do some diy, make some shelving, your own flat pack furniture, cut up sheet materials this type of saw cant be beaten for accuracy, the guide rail will allow even amateurs to get mm perfect cuts and repeat them time and again

Ive been meaning to get myself a track saw for a while the cheapest equivalent to this one is the Scheppach PL55 that sells for £200 with 2x 700mm rails making this one a saving of £140

Even compared to what must be the cheapest plunge saw on the market the Scheppach PL45 with 2 700mm rails this is an absolute bargain, the cheapest i can find that is £155 +£5 shipping and that saw has a smaller blade so less depth of cut.

For those of you tool snobs i don't buy into it,, ive some of the best tools money can buy including the likes of festool and milwaukee and i have parkside tools ive gave some serious punishment and none of them ever failed me, this is not a festool ts 55 but for your diy enthusiast this will be a great tool

Heres a link to a video of what to expect from this kind of tool

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CbPLc0lGdFw

and the copy paste specs....

For clean and precise cutting of wood, plastic, ceramic, aluminium, copper or plasterboard
With a variable cutting depth, tilting sawblade and spindle lock
Includes 2-piece 140cm guide rail, assembly spanner, and Ø 165mm sawblade
No-load-speed (rpm): 5200
Max. cutting depth (mm): 56
Cutting angle (°): 90 - 45

its 1200w going by the specs on the german lidl website

heres a video of some dude giving a demo of the saw,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIcXSIZresw

going by how much he strokes it he likes it a lot :P

Two ways to upgrade your saw are to get a quality blade with more teeth, Freud F03FS02411from ffx tools is a good buy, also a set of clamps ebay item number 321749518617
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alexfn Avatar
1y, 5m agoFound 1 year, 5 months ago
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(1)
6 Likes
redsox9
If you already have a circular saw you can achieve the same result with a straight piece of timber costing £3 clamped to your workpiece to guide the saw plate.
Spoilsport :p

It's a great tool to buy 'just in case' you ever need one. I may buy one and put it in the utility room alongside my unused router and still sealed in box circular saw.Which are on top of my generator (boxed and unopened) and next to the angled drill chuck, torx sets, spanner sets etc that were bought 'just in case' my perfectly good ones break or get lost.

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#1
Looks a great deal
1 Like #2
Great bit of kit. Ideal for cutting doors down after you re-floor and at this price a steal!
#3
Tyranicus66
Great bit of kit. Ideal for cutting doors down after you re-floor and at this price a steal!

That looks interesting - I've got 8 new solid oak doors that need cutting down, but how does it work? Do you clamp the guide rail to the door?

I currently rely on a battery circular saw, a piece of angle iron clamped to the door as a guide and then finishing of with a belt sander.

mike
#4
mjbuckhurst
Tyranicus66
Great bit of kit. Ideal for cutting doors down after you re-floor and at this price a steal!
That looks interesting - I've got 8 new solid oak doors that need cutting down, but how does it work? Do you clamp the guide rail to the door?
I currently rely on a battery circular saw, a piece of angle iron clamped to the door as a guide and then finishing of with a belt sander.
mike
Just done about 14 doors in exactly that way. Clamp the guide to the bottom of the door after marking with a level and zip straight through. Works a treat and even with hollow doors did not split the finish.
1 Like #5
mjbuckhurst
Tyranicus66
Great bit of kit. Ideal for cutting doors down after you re-floor and at this price a steal!
That looks interesting - I've got 8 new solid oak doors that need cutting down, but how does it work? Do you clamp the guide rail to the door?
I currently rely on a battery circular saw, a piece of angle iron clamped to the door as a guide and then finishing of with a belt sander.
mike

you might want to make 2 passes on solid oak doors so set it to 25mm take one pass then set it to the full 56 and go again, the lidl site in the uk doesnt give the power for some reason but ive found it on lidl in germany and its 1200w so should have plenty power, maybe enough to cut it in one pass
#6
alexfn
mjbuckhurst
Tyranicus66
Great bit of kit. Ideal for cutting doors down after you re-floor and at this price a steal!
That looks interesting - I've got 8 new solid oak doors that need cutting down, but how does it work? Do you clamp the guide rail to the door?
I currently rely on a battery circular saw, a piece of angle iron clamped to the door as a guide and then finishing of with a belt sander.
mike
you might want to make 2 passes on solid oak doors so set it to 25mm take one pass then set it to the full 56 and go again, the lidl site in the uk doesnt give the power for some reason but ive found it on lidl in germany and its 1200w so should have plenty power, maybe enough to cut it in one pass

That makes sense, watching all the videos on youtube they seem mostly to do it freestanding without clamping, do these tracks grip well enough, though I'd probably want to clamp anyway.

I got the doors for £30 each, but I can't afford to replace one if I cock it up - my technique works reasonably well, at least the wife is happy, but I can't help thinking that for £60 I'd make my life a lot easier.

mike
1 Like #7
mjbuckhurst
alexfn
mjbuckhurst
Tyranicus66
Great bit of kit. Ideal for cutting doors down after you re-floor and at this price a steal!
That looks interesting - I've got 8 new solid oak doors that need cutting down, but how does it work? Do you clamp the guide rail to the door?
I currently rely on a battery circular saw, a piece of angle iron clamped to the door as a guide and then finishing of with a belt sander.
mike
you might want to make 2 passes on solid oak doors so set it to 25mm take one pass then set it to the full 56 and go again, the lidl site in the uk doesnt give the power for some reason but ive found it on lidl in germany and its 1200w so should have plenty power, maybe enough to cut it in one pass
That makes sense, watching all the videos on youtube they seem mostly to do it freestanding without clamping, do these tracks grip well enough, though I'd probably want to clamp anyway.
I got the doors for £30 each, but I can't afford to replace one if I cock it up - my technique works reasonably well, at least the wife is happy, but I can't help thinking that for £60 I'd make my life a lot easier.
mike

yeah they have rubber on the bottom that helps it grip, the cheapest i can find a set of clamps is 13 quid but it would be worth waiting to see if a set comes in the box, if not search ebay for SCHEPPACH PL55 RAIL TRACK CLAMPS. you can also get a much nicer festool set for 21 but maybe a bit much for a 60 quid saw

ive found a video of this exact saw here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIcXSIZresw there seems to be a small amount of tear out on the cut, to be expected with a 24 tooth blade it would be worth upgrading the supplied blade to a good quality one Freud F03FS02411 18 quid delivered from ffx tools. Thats a good quality 40 tooth blade that will give you a much nicer cut
#8
alexfn
mjbuckhurst
alexfn
mjbuckhurst
Tyranicus66
Great bit of kit. Ideal for cutting doors down after you re-floor and at this price a steal!
That looks interesting - I've got 8 new solid oak doors that need cutting down, but how does it work? Do you clamp the guide rail to the door?
I currently rely on a battery circular saw, a piece of angle iron clamped to the door as a guide and then finishing of with a belt sander.
mike
you might want to make 2 passes on solid oak doors so set it to 25mm take one pass then set it to the full 56 and go again, the lidl site in the uk doesnt give the power for some reason but ive found it on lidl in germany and its 1200w so should have plenty power, maybe enough to cut it in one pass
That makes sense, watching all the videos on youtube they seem mostly to do it freestanding without clamping, do these tracks grip well enough, though I'd probably want to clamp anyway.
I got the doors for £30 each, but I can't afford to replace one if I cock it up - my technique works reasonably well, at least the wife is happy, but I can't help thinking that for £60 I'd make my life a lot easier.
mike
yeah they have rubber on the bottom that helps it grip, the cheapest i can find a set of clamps is 13 quid but it would be worth waiting to see if a set comes in the box, if not search ebay for SCHEPPACH PL55 RAIL TRACK CLAMPS. you can also get a much nicer festool set for 21 but maybe a bit much for a 60 quid saw
ive found a video of this exact saw here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIcXSIZresw there seems to be a small amount of tear out on the cut, to be expected with a 24 tooth blade it would be worth upgrading the supplied blade to a good quality one Freud F03FS02411 18 quid delivered from ffx tools. Thats a good quality 40 tooth blade that will give you a much nicer cut

Thanks for the advice and the link, I suspect out of the box it will do a better job than my Ryobi circular saw, but it's probably worth the small extra to upgrade to a better cut.

mike
#9
mjbuckhurst
alexfn
mjbuckhurst
alexfn
mjbuckhurst
Tyranicus66
Great bit of kit. Ideal for cutting doors down after you re-floor and at this price a steal!
That looks interesting - I've got 8 new solid oak doors that need cutting down, but how does it work? Do you clamp the guide rail to the door?
I currently rely on a battery circular saw, a piece of angle iron clamped to the door as a guide and then finishing of with a belt sander.
mike
you might want to make 2 passes on solid oak doors so set it to 25mm take one pass then set it to the full 56 and go again, the lidl site in the uk doesnt give the power for some reason but ive found it on lidl in germany and its 1200w so should have plenty power, maybe enough to cut it in one pass
That makes sense, watching all the videos on youtube they seem mostly to do it freestanding without clamping, do these tracks grip well enough, though I'd probably want to clamp anyway.
I got the doors for £30 each, but I can't afford to replace one if I cock it up - my technique works reasonably well, at least the wife is happy, but I can't help thinking that for £60 I'd make my life a lot easier.
mike
yeah they have rubber on the bottom that helps it grip, the cheapest i can find a set of clamps is 13 quid but it would be worth waiting to see if a set comes in the box, if not search ebay for SCHEPPACH PL55 RAIL TRACK CLAMPS. you can also get a much nicer festool set for 21 but maybe a bit much for a 60 quid saw
ive found a video of this exact saw here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIcXSIZresw there seems to be a small amount of tear out on the cut, to be expected with a 24 tooth blade it would be worth upgrading the supplied blade to a good quality one Freud F03FS02411 18 quid delivered from ffx tools. Thats a good quality 40 tooth blade that will give you a much nicer cut
Thanks for the advice and the link, I suspect out of the box it will do a better job than my Ryobi circular saw, but it's probably worth the small extra to upgrade to a better cut.
mike

put a bit of masking tape along the middle of your cut line, that will also help avoid tear out on those oak doors,,
#10
Hot! Not sure on the quality but hell it's cheap for a plunge saw :)
#11
When are these in store? Can't seem to find it on the mobile site
#12
anybody know if the guides will fit the festool ts55
#13
Heat - both for the price and the level of advice on the thread
banned#14
rthirlby
When are these in store? Can't seem to find it on the mobile site
Monday 29th June.
#15
isnt it basically a circular saw with a guide?
#16
Ripsnorter!
#17
does it come with the track/guilde rail? thanks
#18
Hot for the info alone !!
Thanks
#19
Are these available yet or is it Monday 29th?
#20
mattyoakley
Are these available yet or is it Monday 29th?

On sale monday
#21
gold3n_dragon
does it come with the track/guilde rail? thanks

Yes 2x700mm rails so 1.4m total
#22
If you already have a circular saw you can achieve the same result with a straight piece of timber costing £3 clamped to your workpiece to guide the saw plate.
6 Likes #23
redsox9
If you already have a circular saw you can achieve the same result with a straight piece of timber costing £3 clamped to your workpiece to guide the saw plate.
Spoilsport :p

It's a great tool to buy 'just in case' you ever need one. I may buy one and put it in the utility room alongside my unused router and still sealed in box circular saw.Which are on top of my generator (boxed and unopened) and next to the angled drill chuck, torx sets, spanner sets etc that were bought 'just in case' my perfectly good ones break or get lost.
1 Like #24
redsox9
If you already have a circular saw you can achieve the same result with a straight piece of timber costing £3 clamped to your workpiece to guide the saw plate.

No to be frank. You are much more likely to get tear out or for the blade to bind up if the wood is not a perfect straight edge. Also the pain in the ass of having to calculate every cut.

You also cannot safely plunge with a circular saw. With this you can do cut outs, for a sink for example.

You can make a poor mans version search on YouTube for (how to build a track saw) but dont expect the same results or to be able to plunge safely.


Edited By: alexfn on Jun 25, 2015 09:59
#25
How's this compare to some lile makita or dewalt I know the prices arw alot different but will this be nearly as good? or wouldn't it last that long?
#26
tovtm
How's this compare to some lile makita or dewalt I know the prices arw alot different but will this be nearly as good? or wouldn't it last that long?


In the right hands you are going to get the same results. If this is for home use or light trade go for it.. If you are using it to earn a living then skip the makita and dewalt and get the festool ts55
#27
alexfn
redsox9
If you already have a circular saw you can achieve the same result with a straight piece of timber costing £3 clamped to your workpiece to guide the saw plate.
No to be frank. You are much more likely to get tear out or for the blade to bind up if the wood is not a perfect straight edge. Also the pain in the ass of having to calculate every cut.
You also cannot safely plunge with a circular saw. With this you can do cut outs, for a sink for example.
You can make a poor mans version search on YouTube for (how to build a track saw) but dont expect the same results or to be able to plunge safely.

Or you could drill a small hole and use a jigsaw?
#28
Does the track come with any clamps? Biggest problem I found, especially if making your own guide is that you cannot use clamps because the motor on the saws always get int the way of them and its impossible.

Most guides have recessed clamps that do not stick up and allow the saw to go over them.

And they have to be on the left (where the motor is) otherwise they are on the side you are cutting off.

Edited By: realtek on Jun 25, 2015 11:34
#29
Where did you find the scheppach PL55 with 2 rails for £200?
Cheapest I could fine was £220 - here
http://www.dm-tools.co.uk/product.php/section//sn/SCHPL55PK2#.VYvYVEYYGd4
I paid £240 for it last year. Worth every penny by the way. Some tools I skimp on but not on something like this.
So although the tool you found is a hot deal - it can't be compared to the Scheppach. That's like comparing two drills - a cheapo one in B&Q with a professional Makita one.
#30
alexfn
redsox9
If you already have a circular saw you can achieve the same result with a straight piece of timber costing £3 clamped to your workpiece to guide the saw plate.
No to be frank. You are much more likely to get tear out or for the blade to bind up if the wood is not a perfect straight edge. Also the pain in the ass of having to calculate every cut.
You also cannot safely plunge with a circular saw. With this you can do cut outs, for a sink for example.
You can make a poor mans version search on YouTube for (how to build a track saw) but dont expect the same results or to be able to plunge safely.

easy to make your own guide .. piece of wood fixed to some hardboard (bottom). run saw along to cut excess hardboard off. youre left with straight edge plus no need to measure each time you need to cut. no reason why it cant be used to plunge cut.

Does the track come with any clamps? Biggest problem I found, especially if making your own guide is that you cannot use clamps because the motor on the saws always get int the way of them and its impossible.

just leave some hardboard on the left hand side of the wood guide for the clamps.

Edited By: wendy07 on Jun 25, 2015 12:09
#31
alexfn
redsox9
If you already have a circular saw you can achieve the same result with a straight piece of timber costing £3 clamped to your workpiece to guide the saw plate.
No to be frank. You are much more likely to get tear out or for the blade to bind up if the wood is not a perfect straight edge. Also the pain in the ass of having to calculate every cut.
You also cannot safely plunge with a circular saw. With this you can do cut outs, for a sink for example.
You can make a poor mans version search on YouTube for (how to build a track saw) but dont expect the same results or to be able to plunge safely.
Cut outs for a sink, I dont think worktops come in 25mm thick or am I missing something!!
#32
aturner
alexfn
redsox9
If you already have a circular saw you can achieve the same result with a straight piece of timber costing £3 clamped to your workpiece to guide the saw plate.
No to be frank. You are much more likely to get tear out or for the blade to bind up if the wood is not a perfect straight edge. Also the pain in the ass of having to calculate every cut.

You also cannot safely plunge with a circular saw. With this you can do cut outs, for a sink for example.
You can make a poor mans version search on YouTube for (how to build a track saw) but dont expect the same results or to be able to plunge safely.
Cut outs for a sink, I dont think worktops come in 25mm thick or am I missing something!!

aturner
alexfn
redsox9
If you already have a circular saw you can achieve the same result with a straight piece of timber costing £3 clamped to your workpiece to guide the saw plate.
No to be frank. You are much more likely to get tear out or for the blade to bind up if the wood is not a perfect straight edge. Also the pain in the ass of having to calculate every cut.
You also cannot safely plunge with a circular saw. With this you can do cut outs, for a sink for example.
You can make a poor mans version search on YouTube for (how to build a track saw) but dont expect the same results or to be able to plunge safely.
Cut outs for a sink, I dont think worktops come in 25mm thick or am I missing something!!


Depth of cut is 56mm
#33
I would love to see someone trying to do a cut out for a sink with one, your end up having visible saw marks on the corners of the sink where the corners meet. Not to mention scratching it :)
#34
Seems to be the same as this one so a considerable saving;

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Professional-Plunge-Cut-Saw-incl-Slide-Rail-Hand-Circular-Saw-Return-Prevention-/301573618288?_trksid=p2141725.m3641.l6368

As previously stated not only are you getting a track saw for easy and perfectly straight cuts but a plunge saw so internal/pocket cuts are easier too. Combine the two features for even more versatility. Someone I know who has used most tools has found the plunge track saw good enough to replace many other sawing tools.

At £60 this is a definite bargain although I personally think 1200W is fairly low but at £60 I'm not complaining. I shall hopefully pick up one locally.

Also these type of saws are so much nicer to use than regular circular saws for general circular saw use.

As previously stated a finer tooth blade will enhance cut quality.
1 Like #35
realtek
I would love to see someone trying to do a cut out for a sink with one, your end up having visible saw marks on the corners of the sink where the corners meet. Not to mention scratching it :)

I think plunge saws are commonly used for fitting sinks into worktops. If there are angled, rounded corners they may use another tool but it can be used for all the straight edges. Many sinks can fit to a rectangular hole anyway if the design has a large lip of steel etc. Don't quote me on this but I think you'll find videos on youtube about installing sinks with a plunge/track saw.
#36
How did they choose those colours ;)
#37
Thank you gentlemen! I have learnt so much from your practical comments.
It's a pleasure to read such helpful responses. So different to the bitchy rubbish frequently posted.
#38
reakt
Where did you find the scheppach PL55 with 2 rails for £200?
Cheapest I could fine was £220 - herehttp://www.dm-tools.co.uk/product.php/section//sn/SCHPL55PK2#.VYvYVEYYGd4
I paid £240 for it last year. Worth every penny by the way. Some tools I skimp on but not on something like this.
So although the tool you found is a hot deal - it can't be compared to the Scheppach. That's like comparing two drills - a cheapo one in B&Q with a professional Makita one.


Its probably made in the same factory as the scheppach to the same specks.. same as the aldi one was.. Check that out on youtube. Thats what makes it such a bargain. It is missing the riving knife of the scheppach but on the other hand it has a duel depth scale for on and off the rail something the scheppach doesn't have.

The scheppach is not made by them. Its a generic plunge track saw made and sold under quite a few different brand names.. Like woodstar
#39
I bought a Dewalt 18V plunge saw as part of a kit a few years ago. At the time I thought, much like others have posted, that it's a gimmick and why don't people just use a guide etc. Even though mine is battery powered and hence not hugely powerful, I was converted in days. The rail isn't just a guide but a proper support. Clamp the rail to a still hung door and you can trim the bottom edge without problems. I've made lots of shelves with them, cutting out the slots on the uprights where my router wouldn't work (hard wood fun).

I can highly recommend the concept ;)
#40
realtek
alexfn
redsox9
If you already have a circular saw you can achieve the same result with a straight piece of timber costing £3 clamped to your workpiece to guide the saw plate.
No to be frank. You are much more likely to get tear out or for the blade to bind up if the wood is not a perfect straight edge. Also the pain in the ass of having to calculate every cut.
You also cannot safely plunge with a circular saw. With this you can do cut outs, for a sink for example.
You can make a poor mans version search on YouTube for (how to build a track saw) but dont expect the same results or to be able to plunge safely.
Or you could drill a small hole and use a jigsaw?


Yes you could.. But they are different tools.. For different jobs. Yes there's some crossover in what you can do. Check out some videos on YouTube or read up on track saw reviews

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