PC Specialist Vanquish Impact III GTX1080 @ ebuyer - £989 - HotUKDeals
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PC Specialist Vanquish Impact III GTX1080 @ ebuyer - £989.00

£989.00 @ Ebuyer
Have been shopping around for a gaming PC and this struck me as the cheapest way to get a GTX1080. I had mine delivered yesterday and it runs everything I've thrown at it at absolutely max settings. I… Read More
crypton Avatar
banned9m, 5d agoFound 9 months, 5 days ago
Have been shopping around for a gaming PC and this struck me as the cheapest way to get a GTX1080. I had mine delivered yesterday and it runs everything I've thrown at it at absolutely max settings. I thought the processor may bottleneck the GPU but it isn't showing signs of doing so at all. Unigine benchmark came out at 4681 which is very high from what I can tell.

I tried configuring a similar PC with only a GTX 1070 but it was still coming out at £1050 so this appears to be a decent deal. Any questions about the PC and I'll try to answer them in the comments. Details on the site are a bit sparse
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crypton Avatar
banned9m, 5d agoFound 9 months, 5 days ago
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1 Like #1
not voting either way but a grand and no SSD seems a little cheap to me
banned#2
tighty
not voting either way but a grand and no SSD seems a little cheap to me


Yeah I felt the same way but I couldn't configure something with a gtx1080 for less than £1300
#3
Fab GPU but the rest isn't setting the world alight from what I can see. Not sure why you'd go for 6400 over 6600 (or better...)
banned#4
PR1
Fab GPU but the rest isn't setting the world alight from what I can see. Not sure why you'd go for 6400 over 6600 (or better...)


I had configured one from OCuk with a 6600 and it came to something around £1500 which it wasn't going to stretch to. The 6400 doesn't seem to be bottlenecking anything
1 Like #5
How about you just build it yourselves?

It's cheaper than configuring a site to build it for you..
#6
Probably ok for high res and lower fps but for 1080p/1440p at high fps (100+ Hz screen) Id expect that CPU to be a little limiting, not huge but noticeable.

Edited By: stuellis on Sep 17, 2016 18:22
banned 1 Like #7
Muffinss
How about you just build it yourselves?

It's cheaper than configuring a site to build it for you..



Not much in it at all these days
#8
You've bought the card nothing else...Even the card is a basic 1080..sorry mate glad it does you but get a ssd at least
banned 2 Likes #9
it's a Zotac 8gb founder's edition if anyone wanted to know
#10
crypton
tighty
not voting either way but a grand and no SSD seems a little cheap to me
Yeah I felt the same way but I couldn't configure something with a gtx1080 for less than £1300

I make £930 without OS. Or with Win10 it comes to just £6 under the cost of this PC Specialist machine.
banned#11
A1M
crypton
tighty
not voting either way but a grand and no SSD seems a little cheap to me
Yeah I felt the same way but I couldn't configure something with a gtx1080 for less than £1300

I make £930 without OS. Or with Win10 it comes to just £6 under the cost of this PC Specialist machine.


spec it with the same graphics card and it's not. this is the Zotac founder's edition. parts picker has it for £638.99
banned 1 Like #12
plus it comes with a 3 year warranty which is always nice :)
#13
Voted hot. As pointed out, might be worth adding in a SSD too.

Would you void warranty if you added in after?

Edited By: DarrylJohn on Sep 17, 2016 18:50
banned#14
I believe you can upgrade the PC yourself without voiding the warranty, it even came with a small manual from PC specialist themselves on how to do this. The warranty itself is stellar, it's 3 years plus lifetime for support. Not sure you get a long warranty buying the parts separately but then again I've never built a PC before so I could be wrong
1 Like #15
Cold. 1k and no SSD at all. It's 2016. SSDs are essential for OS to get the most out of modern hardware.
#16
Founders edition were tge first batch of 1080 cards.....I had to wait 6 weeks to get the 1080 ftw and the strix oc 1080 still isn't in the UK
banned#17
dezontk
Cold. 1k and no SSD at all. It's 2016. SSDs are essential for OS to get the most out of modern hardware.


It is cheaper as a package than the sum of its parts though. Large SSDs seem to be quite affordable these days, though the way this thing plays the witcher 3 I'm not sure I'm going to bother. Will probably get one just to see what the difference is

Edited By: crypton on Sep 17, 2016 21:36: grammar
2 Likes #18
It's not quite a 3yr warranty. 1 Month Collect & Return, 1 Year Parts, 3 Years Labour. So if your computer breaks down for what ever reason they will sort it out within the 30 days. 1Year parts is pretty poor.

For a custom build you would get 3yr on cpu and gpu. Lifetime on ram most of the time. PSU are pretty variable but usually 3years are the minimum up to 10 years on the expensive psus.

I won't stop people from buying it because I did my first computer from pcspecialist i5-2500k, gtx 560ti. Then did small incremental upgrades. Still using the i5-2500k today.

The cpu is linked to the motherboard socket which means if the CPU is showing its age then you need new mobo ram and cpu which is pretty pricy. A new graphics card could be from £250+ every other year or you could get a £500 every three, years. That is an easy upgrade.

Pros-
Cheap 1080
Prebuilt
3rd party troubleshooting

Cons
Reference 1080 so poor cooling and louder.
Less "future proof" for CPU + Motherboard
CPU isn't overclockable so once it gets slow no way to speed it up.

I also suggest getting an SSD. I have a 250GB SSD for Windows plus other software/ some small games. £50-60
I also have a 500GB SSD for all my games which was £85 (kept an eye on a good deal).
At a minimum I would suggest getting a 250Gb SSD for the OS it runs so much smoother/boots/loads. Talking like 5x speed.

Games don't need the SSD but some games like fallout 4 have some pretty long load times. Youtube SSD vs HDD in games which you want to play.



Edited By: mojo5110 on Sep 17, 2016 21:54
banned#19
mojo5110
It's not quite a 3yr warranty. 1 Month Collect & Return, 1 Year Parts, 3 Years Labour. So if your computer breaks down for what ever reason they will sort it out within the 30 days. 1Year parts is pretty poor.

For a custom build you would get 3yr on cpu and gpu. Lifetime on ram most of the time. PSU are pretty variable but usually 3years are the minimum up to 10 years on the expensive psus.

I won't stop people from buying it because I did my first computer from pcspecialist i5-2500k, gtx 560ti. Then did small incremental upgrades. Still using the i5-2500k today.

The cpu is linked to the motherboard socket which means if the CPU is showing its age then you need new mobo ram and cpu which is pretty pricy. A new graphics card could be from £250+ every other year or you could get a £500 every three, years. That is an easy upgrade.

Pros-
Cheap 1080
Prebuilt
3rd party troubleshooting

Cons
Reference 1080 so poor cooling and louder.
Less "future proof" for CPU + Motherboard
CPU isn't overclockable so once it gets slow no way to speed it up.

I also suggest getting an SSD. I have a 250GB SSD for Windows plus other software/ some small games. £50-60
I also have a 500GB SSD for all my games which was £85 (kept an eye on a good deal).
At a minimum I would suggest getting a 250Gb SSD for the OS it runs so much smoother/boots/loads. Talking like 5x speed.

Games don't need the SSD but some games like fallout 4 have some pretty long load times. Youtube SSD vs HDD in games which you want to play.




Very reasonable overview; thanks for that. For my needs and as my first gaming PC, it suits me well.

I do expect to spend about £200-£300 in the next 2-3 years on things like the processor and mobo. Other than that, I probably won't be changing the graphics card.

It does have a PCI x16 slot so it should allow SLI (I think?) and in 3 years when the GPU shows its age, adding another 1080 shouldn't break the bank. Thanks for the info though
banned#20
crypton
mojo5110
It's not quite a 3yr warranty. 1 Month Collect & Return, 1 Year Parts, 3 Years Labour. So if your computer breaks down for what ever reason they will sort it out within the 30 days. 1Year parts is pretty poor.

For a custom build you would get 3yr on cpu and gpu. Lifetime on ram most of the time. PSU are pretty variable but usually 3years are the minimum up to 10 years on the expensive psus.

I won't stop people from buying it because I did my first computer from pcspecialist i5-2500k, gtx 560ti. Then did small incremental upgrades. Still using the i5-2500k today.

The cpu is linked to the motherboard socket which means if the CPU is showing its age then you need new mobo ram and cpu which is pretty pricy. A new graphics card could be from £250+ every other year or you could get a £500 every three, years. That is an easy upgrade.

Pros-
Cheap 1080
Prebuilt
3rd party troubleshooting

Cons
Reference 1080 so poor cooling and louder.
Less "future proof" for CPU + Motherboard
CPU isn't overclockable so once it gets slow no way to speed it up.

I also suggest getting an SSD. I have a 250GB SSD for Windows plus other software/ some small games. £50-60
I also have a 500GB SSD for all my games which was £85 (kept an eye on a good deal).
At a minimum I would suggest getting a 250Gb SSD for the OS it runs so much smoother/boots/loads. Talking like 5x speed.

Games don't need the SSD but some games like fallout 4 have some pretty long load times. Youtube SSD vs HDD in games which you want to play.




Very reasonable overview; thanks for that. For my needs and as my first gaming PC, it suits me well.

I do expect to spend about £200-£300 in the next 2-3 years on things like the processor and mobo. Other than that, I probably won't be changing the graphics card.

It does have a PCI x16 slot so it should allow SLI (I think?) and in 3 years when the GPU shows its age, adding another 1080 shouldn't break the bank. Thanks for the info though


and well done on 500gb for £85! Must have been from HUKD ;)
#21
I'm not all that on computers but I'm in the process of getting the parts now, but surely an i5-6400 is a massive bottleneck for a 1080? You'd need a 6600k at the very least, if not a 6700k
banned#22
Antagonist1
I'm not all that on computers but I'm in the process of getting the parts now, but surely an i5-6400 is a massive bottleneck for a 1080? You'd need a 6600k at the very least, if not a 6700k


From what I can find on the internet, talking to friends who have all made their own rigs and calling PC specialist, it seems that the CPU doesn't play that big a part when it comes to the actual graphically intensive processing. The GPU seems to take care of that. I was worried about that too but there is no bottlenecking in the most demanding games. If there is in a couple of years from now, it's not a difficult upgrade. For now however, it is benchmarking twice the score of a Titan X paired with an overclocked i7 from last year
#23
crypton
mojo5110
It's not quite a 3yr warranty. 1 Month Collect & Return, 1 Year Parts, 3 Years Labour. So if your computer breaks down for what ever reason they will sort it out within the 30 days. 1Year parts is pretty poor.

For a custom build you would get 3yr on cpu and gpu. Lifetime on ram most of the time. PSU are pretty variable but usually 3years are the minimum up to 10 years on the expensive psus.

I won't stop people from buying it because I did my first computer from pcspecialist i5-2500k, gtx 560ti. Then did small incremental upgrades. Still using the i5-2500k today.

The cpu is linked to the motherboard socket which means if the CPU is showing its age then you need new mobo ram and cpu which is pretty pricy. A new graphics card could be from £250+ every other year or you could get a £500 every three, years. That is an easy upgrade.

Pros-
Cheap 1080
Prebuilt
3rd party troubleshooting

Cons
Reference 1080 so poor cooling and louder.
Less "future proof" for CPU + Motherboard
CPU isn't overclockable so once it gets slow no way to speed it up.

I also suggest getting an SSD. I have a 250GB SSD for Windows plus other software/ some small games. £50-60
I also have a 500GB SSD for all my games which was £85 (kept an eye on a good deal).
At a minimum I would suggest getting a 250Gb SSD for the OS it runs so much smoother/boots/loads. Talking like 5x speed.

Games don't need the SSD but some games like fallout 4 have some pretty long load times. Youtube SSD vs HDD in games which you want to play.




Very reasonable overview; thanks for that. For my needs and as my first gaming PC, it suits me well.

I do expect to spend about £200-£300 in the next 2-3 years on things like the processor and mobo. Other than that, I probably won't be changing the graphics card.

It does have a PCI x16 slot so it should allow SLI (I think?) and in 3 years when the GPU shows its age, adding another 1080 shouldn't break the bank. Thanks for the info though


If you have the motherboard box it should have something like Asus h110m or something. If it doesn't have sli ready on the box you can only use one gpu. Sli is usually on the higher end motherboards.

You are probably looking at £450+ for the cpu(250) motherboard (150) ram (50)
So it isn't a small amount doing the combo. It probably isn't going to be an issue until 3-4 years then it might be worth looking into more.

The thing that is probably limiting you now is your monitor. You haven't said what monitor but I am guessing it is 1920x1080 at 60Hz. Which means your screen can only display 60fps at 1080p.
My 970 is maxed on gpu settings and low post processing. And that is much weaker then your 1080. Might be worth looking into a 2540-1440 resolution screen (more pixels=sharper images)
Screens are usually around £200 for that res.

The other thing is a higher frequency monitor. So 1920-1080 at 100Hz or 120hz or 144hz. I would go for any monitor for 100hz or above. Higher frequency ones are more expensive.
If you want a high res high frequency monitor it starts getting pricy.

I haven't done much research on 4k monitors because I know I would get 20fps if I am lucky at 4k. 970 is a beast 1080p and solid 1440p. Might be worth having a look at "Gaming Nexus" channel and look at benchmarks for the GTX 1080.

Most games use the gpu a lot such as Gta V. Some games are really really cpu intensive which means your cpu will be almost max and you might not be able to get much higher fps. Cpu games I have notices is Guild Wars two. I got an extra 20fps average just from overclocking the same cpu. 20fps is a huge jump for a simple speed increase.

95% of the time it's going to gpu heavy games.

I suggest turning on Vsync in games. This makes the gpu match the screen frequency so without Vsync you are getting 200fps and your gpu is at 70% utilisation. Your screen is only 60fps so your are wasting power electricity and you might get screen tearing. If you turn Vsync on it will make it display 60fps at the same quality but your gpu usage if it is anything like mine in the games I play you will be at like 20% utilisation which is almost idle for powering a game.

Your cpu isn't overclockable (Intel have K at the end) motherboard can't so you might switch out screen soon then gpu in 5 years time.

JK
#24
crypton
A1M
crypton
tighty
not voting either way but a grand and no SSD seems a little cheap to me
Yeah I felt the same way but I couldn't configure something with a gtx1080 for less than £1300
I make £930 without OS. Or with Win10 it comes to just £6 under the cost of this PC Specialist machine.
spec it with the same graphics card and it's not. this is the Zotac founder's edition. parts picker has it for £638.99
But that's not actually a good 1080, you only want a founders edition if you are one of those weirdos that have a thing for the look of the stock reference nvidia coolers, otherwise you are paying more for less with the founders editions. Zotac make good cards, but that's the worst of them get the ones with good coolers and they have better clocks for less money.
2 Likes #25
Heat added. I don't understand the 'needs ssd' comments. That seems akin to saying "A round of drinks for £1 isn't a good deal because you need some crisps with it." Just buy the sdd.

I also don't understand how the industry can't definitively tell us whether the cpu represents a bottleneck. It's surely just a case of numbers.
banned#26
smckirdy
crypton
A1M
crypton
tighty
not voting either way but a grand and no SSD seems a little cheap to me
Yeah I felt the same way but I couldn't configure something with a gtx1080 for less than £1300
I make £930 without OS. Or with Win10 it comes to just £6 under the cost of this PC Specialist machine.
spec it with the same graphics card and it's not. this is the Zotac founder's edition. parts picker has it for £638.99
But that's not actually a good 1080, you only want a founders edition if you are one of those weirdos that have a thing for the look of the stock reference nvidia coolers, otherwise you are paying more for less with the founders editions. Zotac make good cards, but that's the worst of them get the ones with good coolers and they have better clocks for less money.


You are probably right but at the end of the day it's all just numbers. It is far more powerful than what I need it for. I haven't found anything that can really stress it yet. I thought the witcher 3 would get it struggling but it plays without a hitch. Each to their own with this deal. For a lazy man who wanted to experience the 'pc master race' it certainly ticks my very few boxes
banned#27
mojo5110
crypton
mojo5110
It's not quite a 3yr warranty. 1 Month Collect & Return, 1 Year Parts, 3 Years Labour. So if your computer breaks down for what ever reason they will sort it out within the 30 days. 1Year parts is pretty poor.

For a custom build you would get 3yr on cpu and gpu. Lifetime on ram most of the time. PSU are pretty variable but usually 3years are the minimum up to 10 years on the expensive psus.

I won't stop people from buying it because I did my first computer from pcspecialist i5-2500k, gtx 560ti. Then did small incremental upgrades. Still using the i5-2500k today.

The cpu is linked to the motherboard socket which means if the CPU is showing its age then you need new mobo ram and cpu which is pretty pricy. A new graphics card could be from £250+ every other year or you could get a £500 every three, years. That is an easy upgrade.

Pros-
Cheap 1080
Prebuilt
3rd party troubleshooting

Cons
Reference 1080 so poor cooling and louder.
Less "future proof" for CPU + Motherboard
CPU isn't overclockable so once it gets slow no way to speed it up.

I also suggest getting an SSD. I have a 250GB SSD for Windows plus other software/ some small games. £50-60
I also have a 500GB SSD for all my games which was £85 (kept an eye on a good deal).
At a minimum I would suggest getting a 250Gb SSD for the OS it runs so much smoother/boots/loads. Talking like 5x speed.

Games don't need the SSD but some games like fallout 4 have some pretty long load times. Youtube SSD vs HDD in games which you want to play.




Very reasonable overview; thanks for that. For my needs and as my first gaming PC, it suits me well.

I do expect to spend about £200-£300 in the next 2-3 years on things like the processor and mobo. Other than that, I probably won't be changing the graphics card.

It does have a PCI x16 slot so it should allow SLI (I think?) and in 3 years when the GPU shows its age, adding another 1080 shouldn't break the bank. Thanks for the info though


If you have the motherboard box it should have something like Asus h110m or something. If it doesn't have sli ready on the box you can only use one gpu. Sli is usually on the higher end motherboards.

You are probably looking at £450+ for the cpu(250) motherboard (150) ram (50)
So it isn't a small amount doing the combo. It probably isn't going to be an issue until 3-4 years then it might be worth looking into more.

The thing that is probably limiting you now is your monitor. You haven't said what monitor but I am guessing it is 1920x1080 at 60Hz. Which means your screen can only display 60fps at 1080p.
My 970 is maxed on gpu settings and low post processing. And that is much weaker then your 1080. Might be worth looking into a 2540-1440 resolution screen (more pixels=sharper images)
Screens are usually around £200 for that res.

The other thing is a higher frequency monitor. So 1920-1080 at 100Hz or 120hz or 144hz. I would go for any monitor for 100hz or above. Higher frequency ones are more expensive.
If you want a high res high frequency monitor it starts getting pricy.

I haven't done much research on 4k monitors because I know I would get 20fps if I am lucky at 4k. 970 is a beast 1080p and solid 1440p. Might be worth having a look at "Gaming Nexus" channel and look at benchmarks for the GTX 1080.

Most games use the gpu a lot such as Gta V. Some games are really really cpu intensive which means your cpu will be almost max and you might not be able to get much higher fps. Cpu games I have notices is Guild Wars two. I got an extra 20fps average just from overclocking the same cpu. 20fps is a huge jump for a simple speed increase.

95% of the time it's going to gpu heavy games.

I suggest turning on Vsync in games. This makes the gpu match the screen frequency so without Vsync you are getting 200fps and your gpu is at 70% utilisation. Your screen is only 60fps so your are wasting power electricity and you might get screen tearing. If you turn Vsync on it will make it display 60fps at the same quality but your gpu usage if it is anything like mine in the games I play you will be at like 20% utilisation which is almost idle for powering a game.

Your cpu isn't overclockable (Intel have K at the end) motherboard can't so you might switch out screen soon then gpu in 5 years time.

JK


Thanks so much for your information, I am still quite a novice when it comes to PC gaming.

I am still yet to get a monitor but have been told anything with G sync is worth looking into. I believe this eliminates or at least decreases the need for V sync to try and match the monitor fps, rather the monitor matches the PC fps.

The least I'll get is a 144hz monitor. I will look into 4k monitors perhaps but as you say, 4k at 144hz at a decent size is still quite expensive. I had also been looking at those ultra wide monitors, like the LG 25UM58-P. The specs aren't great but I like the idea of a screen that wide. I'll have to go and try one to see if it is just a gimmick though.

Thanks for all your input though, it's all education for me. My bread and butter is rocket league anyway so this PC was all just massive overkill ;)
#28
crypton
dezontk
Cold. 1k and no SSD at all. It's 2016. SSDs are essential for OS to get the most out of modern hardware.
It is cheaper as a package than the sum of its parts though. Large SSDs seem to be quite affordable these days, though the way this thing plays the witcher 3 I'm not sure I'm going to bother. Will probably get one just to see what the difference is
I played 100 hours of witcher 3 from wd 2tb hdd then I got bored of hearing dandelions stories every load screen and though it hight it would be worth moving the game to my os ssd and load times are so much quicker. Didn't count but it only takes about 5 seconds to move from one city to the other. Hdd was taking at least 20 or 30 secs. Played the final 50 hours on ssd and just completed it 2 nights ago. Buy a dirt cheap 120gb-250gb ssd and stick win 10 and whatever game you are currently playing. Put everything else on a wd black....

Edited By: delahmed on Sep 21, 2016 21:23
#29
crypton
Antagonist1
I'm not all that on computers but I'm in the process of getting the parts now, but surely an i5-6400 is a massive bottleneck for a 1080? You'd need a 6600k at the very least, if not a 6700k

From what I can find on the internet, talking to friends who have all made their own rigs and calling PC specialist, it seems that the CPU doesn't play that big a part when it comes to the actual graphically intensive processing. The GPU seems to take care of that. I was worried about that too but there is no bottlenecking in the most demanding games. If there is in a couple of years from now, it's not a difficult upgrade. For now however, it is benchmarking twice the score of a Titan X paired with an overclocked i7 from last year
Have you got project cars? Try that as it is quite cpu intensive from what I have heard.
banned#30
I have, yes. I haven't tried playing online but it is buttery smooth on a few laps around Silverstone in a rather lovely Huayra. I'm away for a while now but when I'm back I'll give you actual FPS readings if you'd like. Downloaded purely to try and choke the computer but it ran effortlessly
#31
It's always best to build a machine, it's really easy! you will never get a better and cheaper machine from a shop

I spent 5 min on PC park picker and here's what you can get for ££1164.64
16GB ram, MUCH better motherboard, 250GB ssd + 500GB 7200rpm mechanical drive, better CPU cooler and better Fully modular power supply
http://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/HpzVBP





Edited By: noonecanhelp1 on Nov 01, 2016 13:30: update

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