Philips 3w LED Econic GU10 Spot Bulb. 432/9244 £14.99 @ Argos - HotUKDeals
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NORMALLY £19.99
As ever check LOCAL pick up availability.
Good amount of Lumens output per watt.

Philips 3w LED Econic GU10 Spot Bulb.

3w LED bulb gives the same light output as a 35w Halogen bulb saving you 80% energy and lasting 25 years (average), saving 24 replacement 35w bulbs.
Replacement for a 35w GU10 spot bulb.
Approx. life of bulb 25000hrs/25yrs.
Lumen output 250.
Energy class A.
Not suitable for use with a dimmer switch.
My own experience with Philips light bulbs in whatever shape or form, is that if you have a problem they tend to send you replacements via post.

http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/4329244.htm
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(29) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
that'll be in Argos of course

Linky
#2
Thanks the link when I started this thread has since disappearwed & won't now let me input it on an edit???
#3
Cold ,how many years is it going to take to save any money.
#4
Do these use CREE LED's - could never understand why these are so expensive - even when discounted.
#5
peterwain
Cold ,how many years is it going to take to save any money.


Am inclined to agree, I have three light fittings that each have three of these bulbs in!

The existing bulbs also appear to be dimmable.

Edited By: TheBiker on Feb 06, 2011 19:11
#6
@peterwain.

Not long based on the massive price hikes we are all subjected to.
So let me get this straight you are moaning about an item that uses 32 watts less than a regular halogen of this size? ..jeez, instantly on, no flicker or slow warm up like a cfl, minimal heat, recyclable at end of life)
No specialist fitting required,
80% energy and lasting 25 years (average), saving 24 replacement 35w bulbs estimated, less load on your transformer, so added longevity there..
winner all round in my book
#7
MR GUS
@peterwain.

Not long based on the massive price hikes we are all subjected to.
So let me get this straight you are moaning about an item that uses 32 watts less than a regular halogen of this size? ..jeez, instantly on, no flicker or slow warm up like a cfl, minimal heat, recyclable at end of life)
No specialist fitting required,
80% energy and lasting 25 years (average), saving 24 replacement 35w bulbs estimated, less load on your transformer, so added longevity there..
winner all round in my book


Sounds great but I don't think I have twenty five left to reap the savings.
#8
would get these but theyre not dimmable!
#9
These are rubbish. Much better 50w equivalents are available for less money.
#10
termite
These are rubbish. Much better 50w equivalents are available for less money.


Sounds great, have you got any links for these ones?
1 Like #11
peterwain
Cold ,how many years is it going to take to save any money.


You'd break even after about 2000 hours use (based on current average pay monthly DD prices for electricity) so if you have a light on for say 6 hours per day that's about 1 year.
#12
risheet
would get these but theyre not dimmable!


There are dimmable transformers you can buy these days that generally work with LED bulbs, if you look around & check specs with manufacturers.
cheapy transformers tend to be a false economy where halogen lighting is concerned (the black marks & constant replacements) ..something LED helps with, esp useful for busy folk, or those with limited movement eg the elderly.
#13
Foxy102


Sounds great, have you got any links for these ones?


These are good.
#14
bigsky
peterwain
Cold ,how many years is it going to take to save any money.


You'd break even after about 2000 hours use (based on current average pay monthly DD prices for electricity) so if you have a light on for say 6 hours per day that's about 1 year.


You've got it in one, you place lighting according to needs, lighting & loading, in sat an office or workroom / livingroom where the hours are longer you will of course see payback, faster when you consider the next rise in Leccy prices.
1 Like #15
I had a shocking electrical bill if you'll pardon the pun. So will replace my normal halogens with either of these products: GU10 CFL from ebulbshop - though problems with their stock system tonight or 5 packs of LED bulbs from ebay suppliers, such as i-home.com, for £28 ish. I won't pay £15 per unit. So this is cold from me.

From my research, I need a good strong light in the kitchen so I will go for 11W GU10s as a replacement for my 50W halogens.

Edited By: matedodgy on Feb 06, 2011 19:45
#16
matedodgy
I had a shocking electrical bill if you'll pardon the pun. So will replace my normal halogens with either of these products: GU10 CFL from ebulbshop or GU10 LED from ebay supplier. I won't pay £15 per unit. So this is cold from me.

From my research, I need a good strong light in the kitchen so I will go for 11W GU10s as a replacement for my 50W halogens.


Those ones are too big for a lot of GU10 fittings and the give off a weird light.
#17
matedodgy
I had a shocking electrical bill if you'll pardon the pun. So will replace my normal halogens with either of these products: GU10 CFL from ebulbshop - though problems with their stock system tonight or 5 packs of LED bulbs from ebay suppliers, such as i-home.com, for £28 ish. I won't pay £15 per unit. So this is cold from me.

From my research, I need a good strong light in the kitchen so I will go for 11W GU10s as a replacement for my 50W halogens.


Cfl's are fine if you can afford to wait for the pinkish hue to go & a workable light develop.
(although there are some fast starters now)
Cfl's are also only designed to deal with around 3 times turn on's per hour, so if you are popping in & out, may affect the lifespan by a great amount.
but yes they're cheap..
#18
MR GUS
matedodgy
I had a shocking electrical bill if you'll pardon the pun. So will replace my normal halogens with either of these products: GU10 CFL from ebulbshop - though problems with their stock system tonight or 5 packs of LED bulbs from ebay suppliers, such as i-home.com, for £28 ish. I won't pay £15 per unit. So this is cold from me.

From my research, I need a good strong light in the kitchen so I will go for 11W GU10s as a replacement for my 50W halogens.


Cfl's are fine if you can afford to wait for the pinkish hue to go & a workable light develop.
(although there are some fast starters now)
Cfl's are also only designed to deal with around 3 times turn on's per hour, so if you are popping in & out, may affect the lifespan by a great amount.
but yes they're cheap..


Who would regularly turn a light on and off more than 3 times an hour?
1 Like #19
I have these from ebest24 - work well for me and have no complaints... Currently £5 odd.

http://www.ebest24.com/en/gu10-warm-white-60-smd-led-spot-light-bulb-lamp.html

They do take a while to arrive though!
#20
Is this a single bulb?!?!
They're far cheaper on the bay
#21
termite
Foxy102


Sounds great, have you got any links for these ones?


These are good.


Tried one of these in my kitchen. It is good but it does not give same brightness at worksurface below lamp as a standard 50W bulb. However, standard bulb has 38° beam while this LED has 120° so it is not comparing like with like.
#22
dion280
I have these from ebest24 - work well for me and have no complaints... Currently £5 odd.

http://www.ebest24.com/en/gu10-warm-white-60-smd-led-spot-light-bulb-lamp.html


They do take a while to arrive though!


That's interesting. Where are they shipped from? How long did they take to arrive?
#23
MR GUS
risheet
would get these but theyre not dimmable!
There are dimmable transformers you can buy these days that generally work with LED bulbs, if you look around & check specs with manufacturers.cheapy transformers tend to be a false economy where halogen lighting is concerned (the black marks & constant replacements) ..something LED helps with, esp useful for busy folk, or those with limited movement eg the elderly.

GU10's are 240v, what situation would you use a transformer ?
#24
andynicol
MR GUS
risheet
would get these but theyre not dimmable!
There are dimmable transformers you can buy these days that generally work with LED bulbs, if you look around & check specs with manufacturers.cheapy transformers tend to be a false economy where halogen lighting is concerned (the black marks & constant replacements) ..something LED helps with, esp useful for busy folk, or those with limited movement eg the elderly.


GU10's are 240v, what situation would you use a transformer ?


I'm generalising, there are so many folk in this world with cheap kits of admittedly differing voltage..
My mate & I used to replace so many transformers it was stupid, ...a sparks call out (him), & sorting the kit one way or another..could be very expensive for the customer weighing up replacing kit or leaving it in situ knowing the situation.

Busy day looking at different units for a prospective fitting, ..addled.
#25
It's been an interesting and timely debate for me. I'll probably try some CFLs and a set of LEDs then decide which is best for us. I wonder where ebest ship from?
#26
MR GUS
andynicol
MR GUS
risheet
would get these but theyre not dimmable!
There are dimmable transformers you can buy these days that generally work with LED bulbs, if you look around & check specs with manufacturers.cheapy transformers tend to be a false economy where halogen lighting is concerned (the black marks & constant replacements) ..something LED helps with, esp useful for busy folk, or those with limited movement eg the elderly.
GU10's are 240v, what situation would you use a transformer ?
I'm generalising, there are so many folk in this world with cheap kits of admittedly differing voltage..My mate & I used to replace so many transformers it was stupid, ...a sparks call out (him), & sorting the kit one way or another..could be very expensive for the customer weighing up replacing kit or leaving it in situ knowing the situation.Busy day looking at different units for a prospective fitting, ..addled.

Very expensive?

Decent sparky's should charge no more than an hours labour plus the cost of the transformer (£10 or so from decent wholesaler) or less depending on size) for replacing a transformer, add in several 12v bulbs (50p each) and your looking at around £40.

But why you feel the need to bring in the subject of transformers into this thread beats me....
#27
andynicol, Expensive yes, at that price when folk have not long ago paid out money for failing kit, then being told they may wish to consider changing the trans on their large array.

Like I said brain is addled, long day & I am actually looking at an led set up requiring decent transformers on multiple (pc) windows.

Anyhow another mains option for lower energy Halogen is /was (they used to be cheap) are the philips energy saver halogens, been using em for 5+ years (I estimate) in our conservatory, kitchen & utility rooms where there was 1000w pumping out combined, replaced them with the energy savers as fast start up cfls were still pricey, 60w output instant light 20 watts consumption, makes for a good alternative & they don't mind simply being flicked on & off in short bursts..
they were around £4.50 but I can't see any for less than £13.00 in places like homebase these days.

Also with regards to the Philips Econic 3W GU10 Spotlight I found this online earlier tonight & inadvertantly closed the page..below is the segment pasted from the site,..(so not my views)

http://www.earth.org.uk/LED-lighting.html


The first thing to be careful is that there are apparently as at 2010/08/10 two versions of this in circulation, one marked 15 year life and the other 25, and neither marked on the packaging with lumens output, and Philips' own site is coy too, and their customer enquiries initially suggested 300lm output which would be remarkable, and then a week later called me back to say 220lm. This confusion is unhelpful at the very least, and I expect better of Philips.

I have borrowed one of the devices labelled as 25-year life (25,000 hours), which I take to be the same as this Argos 432/9244 lamp, which is given as 250lm, ie ~80lm/W, thus beating the V3 in efficiency if so. Certainly by eye the light output is not remarkably different from the 7W V3, even allowing for the slightly different light colour and very different beam (a spot at the 25° claimed on the packaging that I have).

This bulb is slightly shorter than the V3, at 50mm, and does not protrude at all from our kitchen fitting.

The lamp is 'instant-on'.

My daughter preferred this 3000K/warm light over the current 6000K/cool lamp in her bedside light.

My partner liked the light quality in our kitchen.

A friend described it as not looking "quite so much like a gadget from an episode of 'Blake's Seven'" compared to the V3!

This lamp seems to be matching or beating standard CFL efficiency, which is hard to do to this style of fitting. At £20 it's still quite expensive, but the Argos page claims that it will last as long as 25 (35W) halogen bulbs at about £2.50 each, so likely cost-effective even ignoring the substantial energy savings

Edited By: MR GUS on Feb 07, 2011 00:31
1 Like #28
MR GUS
andynicol, Expensive yes, at that price when folk have not long ago paid out money for failing kit, then being told they may wish to consider changing the trans on their large array.

Like I said brain is addled, long day & I am actually looking at an led set up requiring decent transformers on multiple (pc) windows.

Anyhow another mains option for lower energy Halogen is /was (they used to be cheap) are the philips energy saver halogens, been using em for 5+ years (I estimate) in our conservatory, kitchen & utility rooms where there was 1000w pumping out combined, replaced them with the energy savers as fast start up cfls were still pricey, 60w output instant light 20 watts consumption, makes for a good alternative & they don't mind simply being flicked on & off in short bursts..
they were around £4.50 but I can't see any for less than £13.00 in places like homebase these days.

Also with regards to the Philips Econic 3W GU10 Spotlight I found this online earlier tonight & inadvertantly closed the page..

http://www.earth.org.uk/LED-lighting.html



The first thing to be careful is that there are apparently as at 2010/08/10 two versions of this in circulation, one marked 15 year life and the other 25, and neither marked on the packaging with lumens output, and Philips' own site is coy too, and their customer enquiries initially suggested 300lm output which would be remarkable, and then a week later called me back to say 220lm. This confusion is unhelpful at the very least, and I expect better of Philips.

I have borrowed one of the devices labelled as 25-year life (25,000 hours), which I take to be the same as this Argos 432/9244 lamp, which is given as 250lm, ie ~80lm/W, thus beating the V3 in efficiency if so. Certainly by eye the light output is not remarkably different from the 7W V3, even allowing for the slightly different light colour and very different beam (a spot at the 25° claimed on the packaging that I have).

This bulb is slightly shorter than the V3, at 50mm, and does not protrude at all from our kitchen fitting.

The lamp is 'instant-on'.

My daughter preferred this 3000K/warm light over the current 6000K/cool lamp in her bedside light.

My partner liked the light quality in our kitchen.

A friend described it as not looking "quite so much like a gadget from an episode of 'Blake's Seven'" compared to the V3!

This lamp seems to be matching or beating standard CFL efficiency, which is hard to do to this style of fitting. At £20 it's still quite expensive, but the Argos page claims that it will last as long as 25 (35W) halogen bulbs at about £2.50 each, so likely cost-effective even ignoring the substantial energy savings


You certainly are addled. I pity anyone who has paid for your 'advice'.
#29
termite
[quote=MR GUS]andynicol, Expensive yes, at that price when folk have not long ago paid out money for failing kit, then being told they may wish to consider changing the trans on their large array.Like I said brain is addled, long day & I am actually looking at an led set up requiring decent transformers on multiple (pc) windows.Anyhow another mains option for lower energy Halogen is /was (they used to be cheap) are the philips energy saver halogens, been using em for 5+ years (I estimate) in our conservatory, kitchen & utility rooms where there was 1000w pumping out combined, replaced them with the energy savers as fast start up cfls were still pricey, 60w output instant light 20 watts consumption, makes for a good alternative & they don't mind simply being flicked on & off in short bursts..they were around £4.50 but I can't see any for less than £13.00 in places like homebase these days.Also with regards to the Philips Econic 3W GU10 Spotlight I found this online earlier tonight & inadvertantly closed the page..[url=" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.earth.org.uk/LED-lighting.htmlThe first thing to be careful is that there are apparently as at 2010/08/10 two versions of this in circulation, one marked 15 year life and the other 25, and neither marked on the packaging with lumens output, and Philips' own site is coy too, and their customer enquiries initially suggested 300lm output which would be remarkable, and then a week later called me back to say 220lm. This confusion is unhelpful at the very least, and I expect better of Philips.I have borrowed one of the devices labelled as 25-year life (25,000 hours), which I take to be the same as this Argos 432/9244 lamp, which is given as 250lm, ie ~80lm/W, thus beating the V3 in efficiency if so. Certainly by eye the light output is not remarkably different from the 7W V3, even allowing for the slightly different light colour and very different beam (a spot at the 25° claimed on the packaging that I have).This bulb is slightly shorter than the V3, at 50mm, and does not protrude at all from our kitchen fitting.The lamp is 'instant-on'.My daughter preferred this 3000K/warm light over the current 6000K/cool lamp in her bedside light.My partner liked the light quality in our kitchen.A friend described it as not looking "quite so much like a gadget from an episode of 'Blake's Seven'" compared to the V3!This lamp seems to be matching or beating standard CFL efficiency, which is hard to do to this style of fitting. At £20 it's still quite expensive, but the Argos page claims that it will last as long as 25 (35W) halogen bulbs at about £2.50 each, so likely cost-effective even ignoring the substantial energy savings
You certainly are addled. I pity anyone who has paid for your 'advice'.[/quote]

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