Philips 8W (40W) Energy Saving Light Bulb 4 for £1 - HotUKDeals
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Philips 8W (40W) Energy Saving Light Bulb 4 for £1.00

Chelle31 Avatar
8y, 10m agoFound 8 years, 10 months ago
Philips
8 Watt (40Watt equivilant)
Energy Saving Light Bulb
Bayonet Fitting

4 Bulbs for £1 in Morrisons
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Comments/page:
#1
i work for an electrical wholesalers and we buy these for £1.19 each how they can sell 4 for a quid is beyond me
#2
I saw these in the Warminster branch earlier, they are 29p each if you didn't need 4.
#3
Well spotted; I'll add these to the shopping list.
#4
Where can i find Philips 40w small edison screw ses for these really cheap prices.....i need 20 to save the planet..............like fcuk..............like to save more money..................
#5
[COLOR="Indigo"][SIZE="2"]I payed £14.50 for a Philips 18W bulb 25 years ago- now that was a bargain!! ( and yes you still saved money over its lifetime!) so this price is now daft. [/SIZE][/COLOR]:-D
#6
Thats a great Price B&Q London branches have been giving them away in exchange for old bulbs this weekend ..The led bubs that replace diochoric spots are very good not as cheap ive replaced the one in my biorb fish bowl was 25 watt now 1 watt gives a nice glow still about £4 each .

The supermarkets get a subsidy on the energy saving bulbs that is why they can sell them cheap!!
#7
Is it just me or do others find that these low energy bulbs give out a poor orange glow?

If I replace a 60watt regular bulb with the equivalent low energy bulb, the light is pathetic.
If i swap for what should be 100watt equivalent that makes it a better light but then I'm not saving the energy that I should be able to.
Also can't seem to get low energy bulbs in very small sizes to suit my wall lights which are what I use most.
#8
barginfan;1450904
Is it just me or do others find that these low energy bulbs give out a poor orange glow?
If I replace a 60watt regular bulb with the equivalent low energy bulb, the light is pathetic...

Completely agree. They light they emit is so depressing. Plus, they contain mercury, so if you happen to break one, you are f****d (neurotoxic mercury vapours).
Only IKEA seems to take them for recycling, so for evey one disposed off in the trash, more mercury is released into our landfills.
Funny how they do not write that on the packaging.
#9
There is more mercury in a tuna sandwich than in a low energy bulb.........source...japanese tuna fishermans gazzette........................
#10
Thats a crazy price.

V-Hot
1 Like #11
I used to eat loads of tuna when i was young............but what with the mercury in tuna, on a hot day i was 8foot6 in my socks
#12
Light output is measured in Lumens. A 100W filament bulb should give 1200 lumens at 240V.
If you check on the box of a Phillips 18W low energy, 100W equivalent, light bulb you will see it says that it gives out 1100 lumens so it CANNOT seem as bright as a 100W filament. Why they call it a 100W equivalent I don't know. This is why I don't buy Phillips18W unless I don't need it as bright. I go for a 20W other brand.

BUT even a 20W low energy will not be as bright as a 100W filament in my light fittings because of the voltage of my mains supply. I kept blowing light bulbs too quick a while ago so I bought a energy monitor from Maplin. This showed that my mains voltage is at 247V - 250V. A 240V filament bulb when run at 250V will burn hotter and give out more light but won't last as long. So my bulbs were popping quick but giving out more than 1200 lumens. So when I changed to 20W low energy bulbs (which don't depend on voltage level) they are dimmer.

The Europe-wide spec of the mains supply says it can be from 216V up to 253V. I know from experience that Spain runs at about 225V. So when they plug in a low energy bulb it will seem brighter than the filament it replaces.
banned#13
good explaination dp1503, I bought these before xmas hoping to replace my normal lights, they were going for 39p each at that time in morrisons. I bought a dozen of them, however only after a month they are all gone and they do give very dim light as compared to filament based ones. I have been searching around for energy saving lights which give bright light but have not found any cheaper ones, the ones available are very expensive and the margin for energy saving is very low. In my opinion these bulbs are useless for the purpose they are advertised for, they might be useful for places where good light is not important.
#14
You cant use energy saving bulbs with dimmer switches.
Plus they take some time to get to full brightness.
And apart from normal bulbs they are expensive as spotlights or candle type bulbs.

So they can't really be used in 70 per cent of my house even if i wanted to.
I might as well just put the cash into my electricity bill and just make sure i turn off lights when not used.

Some way to go in my opinion

A.
#15
I would have them in every light fitting if i could but with the small shades they stick out.As for the Murcury its minute,what about all the lead in the billions of normal bulbs that have been used over the years.
#16
Pleased I'm not alone on this one.

Might be an idea to stock up on regular bulbs before they become unavailable then.
Apparently the government plans to prevent the sale of conventional bulbs by 2011.
#17
CFLs contain environmentally harmful materials in their manufacture, such as lead and mercury. CFLs cannot be part of normal domestic waste. [SIZE="5"]By contrast, no environmentally harmful materials are used in tungsten filament lamps[/SIZE].

Three sets of regulations cover the disposal of CFLs: the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Regulations, the Restriction of the Use of certain Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment Regulations 2006 (which complement the WEEE Regulations), and he Landfill (England & Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2005. The latter defines fluorescent tubes as hazardous materials and thereby dictates how they should be stored, moved, and disposed of.


SOURCE:
http://www.voltimum.co.uk/news/9147/infopro.profnews.voltimum/Government-policy-on-low-energy-light-bulbs-is--insufficient-and-misguided-.html
#18
Government give out free energy saving light bulbs from time to time, ive even had them randomly delivered to my door, to help save economy and all that. So i use them all the time. Just doing my bit i suppose. :)
#19
barginfan
Pleased I'm not alone on this one.

Might be an idea to stock up on regular bulbs before they become unavailable then.
Apparently the government plans to prevent the sale of conventional bulbs by 2011.


I know I'm not the only one to have a box of regulars in the attic for where I can't use CFLs after 2011.
I like CFLs but they can't be used everywhere. I don't think they will ban them. They'll just stick a huge import tax on them so you'll need a mortgage for a 40W in your downstairs toilet.
#20
antenna
Where can i find Philips 40w small edison screw ses for these really cheap prices.....i need 20 to save the planet..............like fcuk..............like to save more money..................


I'd like to know too. I can't find them cheaper than £2 each in the shops.
#21
You might want to check this blog post where a direct comparison between halogen and CFL light is made... With photos... http://athow.com/2007/12/09/dump-the-lamp-post-moving-to-a-white-light-standing-lamp/
#22
deal me in
[COLOR="Indigo"][SIZE="2"]I payed £14.50 for a Philips 18W bulb 25 years ago- now that was a bargain!! ( and yes you still saved money over its lifetime!) so this price is now daft. [/SIZE][/COLOR]:-D


Hi is it still working?:thumbsup:
#23
antenna
I used to eat loads of tuna when i was young............but what with the mercury in tuna, on a hot day i was 8foot6 in my socks


Absolute comedy genius! Sounds like Morecambe and Wise
#24
I have used low energy bulbs for the last 16 years and my oldest bulb gave up the ghost last year,and in the 16 years I have been using them I have only had three bulbs give up out of the 12 bulbs I have around the house and the only room I don't have them in is in the kitchen.
I must admit that most of the bulbs are 100w equivalents
This is a brill deal
Heat and rep left
#25
antenna
There is more mercury in a tuna sandwich than in a low energy bulb.........source...japanese tuna fishermans gazzette........................


I'm ready to be corrected but think there's quite a lot more mercury in a low energy bulb than that.

Tuna has about 0.35mg per kilo.

A low energy bulb contains between 5 and 15mg (the first generation bulbs contained 100mg!)

If you break one there are two main things to remember -

a) ventilate and get out of the room immediately - the vapour is deadly.

b) NEVER use a vacuum to clear up.
#26
I bought some of these last year at Morrison's when they were 39p a go. They are still going. About as good as any other energy saver.

They had 60W equivalent and 100W equivalent and they were the screw in type that can be hard to come by anywhere but IKEA.
#27
nice find
#28
jagermeister;1450592
i work for an electrical wholesalers and we buy these for £1.19 each how they can sell 4 for a quid is beyond me

Seems you should be buying them from Morrisons then.:whistling:
#29
Not a bad price! Now does anyone know where I can get a cheap chemical suit in case one of them breaks?!
#30
PMW14282
Not a bad price! Now does anyone know where I can get a cheap chemical suit in case one of them breaks?!


You try holding your breath while putting on a chemical suit................remember,you cant call for help!.......................................
#31
I thought these bulbs contained a vacuum...........so when broken the worst that could happen is that you would get a nasty suck......................
#32
barginfan
Is it just me or do others find that these low energy bulbs give out a poor orange glow?
Orange?! What brand did you buy? I'm aware some Poundland bulbs are a bit poor, but the 39p Philips E.ON endorsed bulbs seem fine to me
#33
cityslicker
Plus they take some time to get to full brightness.
When did you last buy one? They have improved vastly in the last 2 years or so.
cityslicker
And apart from normal bulbs they are expensive as spotlights or candle type bulbs.
Again, when did you last buy one?! In most stores, they're the same as a normal bulb. Some places like Morrisons are often cheaper for a CFL than a "normal" bulb
#34
sheedatali
I bought a dozen of them, however only after a month they are all gone
How do you mean "all gone"? As in, broken? They should last about 8 years. What did the store say when you took them back? What brand were they?

dp1503

BUT even a 20W low energy will not be as bright as a 100W filament in my light fittings because of the voltage of my mains supply. I kept blowing light bulbs too quick a while ago so I bought a energy monitor from Maplin. This showed that my mains voltage is at 247V - 250V.
The Europe-wide spec of the mains supply says it can be from 216V up to 253V.
Interestingly, I have a little battle going on with the leccy company. I had 2 tvs, a digibox and a dvd player all blow within 2 months, all power supply related. They fitted a voltage recorder and then wrote and said that they had made changes to the supply. I wrote for compensation, but their reply was that it was within the 253 volt limit. I eventually got the actual readings, which were 255.9 - I'll let you know the outcome of the current round!

Anyway, is this the most expensive bulb around? Shurely shome mishtake! (Seen yesterday)
http://www.digitaltoast.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/02/maplins_expensive_bulbs.jpg
#35
barginfan
CFLs contain environmentally harmful materials in their manufacture, such as lead and mercury. CFLs cannot be part of normal domestic waste. [SIZE="5"]By contrast, no environmentally harmful materials are used in tungsten filament lamps[/SIZE].
SOURCE:
http://www.voltimum.co.uk/news/9147/infopro.profnews.voltimum/Government-policy-on-low-energy-light-bulbs-is--insufficient-and-misguided-.html

This is the same page that says:
“However, the initial cost of the lamp is 10-20 times more than the humble light bulb. Supporters of CFL technology argue that break-even costs can be achieved in about 12 months. However, the savings are rarely apparent,”
Can you believe a site like that?!

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